Author Topic: Help with French  (Read 2993 times)

Offline red solo cup

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Help with French
« on: April 19, 2014, 08:07:12 AM »
I have an email with the phrase 'Il est difficile d'etre vent"  It translates as "It is difficult to be wind" Can someone tell me what it means ?
"It's so lonely 'round the fields of Athenry"
 

Offline Bernadette

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Re: Help with French
« Reply #1 on: April 19, 2014, 11:53:48 AM »
Is that the whole sentence? I ask because there's an expression "etre vent debout," which means, from what I can gather, "to be opposed to the reallization of an idea or project."
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Offline Bonaventure

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Re: Help with French
« Reply #2 on: April 19, 2014, 01:40:53 PM »
Ecce ancilla Domini?
 

Offline drummerboy

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Re: Help with French
« Reply #3 on: April 19, 2014, 05:20:30 PM »
 

Offline red solo cup

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Re: Help with French
« Reply #4 on: April 19, 2014, 06:10:28 PM »
Is that the whole sentence? I ask because there's an expression "etre vent debout," which means, from what I can gather, "to be opposed to the reallization of an idea or project."
Yes that was the entire sentence.
"It's so lonely 'round the fields of Athenry"
 

Offline Bonaventure

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Re: Help with French
« Reply #5 on: April 20, 2014, 12:26:54 AM »
 

Offline Ancilla Domini

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Re: Help with French
« Reply #6 on: April 20, 2014, 06:05:38 PM »
I have an email with the phrase 'Il est difficile d'etre vent"  It translates as "It is difficult to be wind" Can someone tell me what it means ?

That's not an expression I've ever heard. Nor can I find it in any of my books or on the internet. If this was written by a native speaker, there must be some typo, spelling error, or words left out. If not by a native speaker, then there is some learner error at play. If I had seen this in a student's composition, my best guess would be that he meant to say, "Il est difficile d'avoir vingt ans" or "It is hard being 20 (years old)." But he could also have meant something like, "Il est difficile d'être dans le vent" or "It is hard to keep up with the fashions" or "Il est difficile d'être vent debout" as Bernadette suggested. Can you explain the context in which this was written?
 

Offline Ancilla Domini

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Re: Help with French
« Reply #7 on: April 20, 2014, 06:06:26 PM »
Ecce ancilla Domini?

She left

Fiat mihi secundum verbum tuum.

I felt something pulling me back. It must have been this unanswered language question.  :)
 

Offline perdurabit

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Re: Help with French
« Reply #8 on: April 20, 2014, 06:26:29 PM »
Without knowing the context, it's impossible to say whether it's a question of a missing word, incorrect language or mediaeval poetry.....!




Etienne DURAND   (1586-1618)

Je voudrais bien être vent quelquefois



Je voudrais bien être vent quelquefois
Pour me jouer aux cheveux d'Uranie,
Puis être poudre aussitôt je voudrais,
Quand elle tombe en sa gorge polie.

Soudain encor je me souhaiterais
Pouvoir changer en cette toile unie
Qui va couvrant ce beau corps que je dois
Nommer ma mort aussitôt que ma vie.

Ces changements plairaient à mon désir,
Mais pour avoir encor plus de plaisir,
Je voudrais bien puce être devenue,

Je baiserais ce corps que j'aime tant,
Et la forêt à mes yeux inconnue
Me servirait de retraite à l'instant.
 

Offline Heinrich

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Re: Help with French
« Reply #9 on: April 20, 2014, 07:12:01 PM »
Maybe it is Canadian.
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Offline Lynne

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Re: Help with French
« Reply #10 on: April 20, 2014, 07:31:39 PM »
Ecce ancilla Domini?

She left

Fiat mihi secundum verbum tuum.

I felt something pulling me back. It must have been this unanswered language question.  :)
Whatever it takes...

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Offline Ancilla Domini

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Re: Help with French
« Reply #11 on: April 20, 2014, 07:47:22 PM »
My search would have turned up either a Canadian expression or a literary reference, unless it is a very obscure one. No, I suspect franglais.
 

Offline Ancilla Domini

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Re: Help with French
« Reply #12 on: April 20, 2014, 07:48:07 PM »
 

Offline red solo cup

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Re: Help with French
« Reply #13 on: April 20, 2014, 08:43:50 PM »
I have an email with the phrase 'Il est difficile d'etre vent"  It translates as "It is difficult to be wind" Can someone tell me what it means ?

That's not an expression I've ever heard. Nor can I find it in any of my books or on the internet. If this was written by a native speaker, there must be some typo, spelling error, or words left out. If not by a native speaker, then there is some learner error at play. If I had seen this in a student's composition, my best guess would be that he meant to say, "Il est difficile d'avoir vingt ans" or "It is hard being 20 (years old)." But he could also have meant something like, "Il est difficile d'être dans le vent" or "It is hard to keep up with the fashions" or "Il est difficile d'être vent debout" as Bernadette suggested. Can you explain the context in which this was written?
This fellow sent me a picture of a mallard swallowing a large frog. Ducks are not known for this and the pic could be a photo-shop or some sort
of joke. I being an inveterate smartass responded " cuisses de grenouilles" which I understand to mean frogs legs in French and added' bon
apettite". However I hit send before realizing I had hit the b key rather than n key and wrote bob apettite. Could this be a sly reference to my
misspelling?
"It's so lonely 'round the fields of Athenry"
 

Offline Ancilla Domini

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Re: Help with French
« Reply #14 on: April 20, 2014, 08:58:40 PM »
This fellow sent me a picture of a mallard swallowing a large frog. Ducks are not known for this and the pic could be a photo-shop or some sort of joke. I being an inveterate smartass responded " cuisses de grenouilles" which I understand to mean frogs legs in French and added' bon apettite". However I hit send before realizing I had hit the b key rather than n key and wrote bob apettite. Could this be a sly reference to my misspelling?

I have no idea. This could be the work of human error, autocorrect, autocomplete, Google Translate, or any combination thereof. As unappealing as it may be, I think your only option is to ask him what he meant. And let us all know! Only then will we solve the mystery!  :)