Author Topic: How to be poor?  (Read 2504 times)

Offline Gardener

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How to be poor?
« on: September 12, 2021, 12:02:42 AM »
This titular question comes from plain ignorance. It doesn't come from malice or joking. I'm genuinely curious because, due to the vaccine mandates by the pudding eating Commander in Thief, this may be more reality than mental exercise in the near future... the very, very near future.

Background: I've done the poor thing before (well, I think so at least?) but I was single, fresh out of the Army, and my VA/Army retirement was able to pay for a very crappy studio apt ($500/mo at the time), basic food (maybe $200/mo), and I could do odd jobs when and how I wanted; in short, I was poor but not in a state of manic desperation. I didn't have to do food kitchens or contemplate crime. I somehow lived joyfully and very simply on something around <20k a year in the higher cost of living location of Colorado Springs. I even paid off a vehicle by scrimping and saving. I'd randomly force myself to go to bed hungry sometimes to "practice" in case it got worse, though I thought worse meant bad and at the time I thought I had it pretty darn good (which I did, compared to many). But I have no idea how to be that level of poor with kids, a 2021 mortgage, or in an environment that's not permissive to a rapidly unpopular mode of thinking with very little upward or even lateral mobility. It was a different time.

So tell me... if you have been, are, or are intimately connected with assisting or interacting with poor folks in the context of family and much higher cost of living: how do you, or they, do it? I want honest answers. If you are embarrassed by the reality, please PM me.

Tips?

Tricks?

What sort of things were lines in the sand for you and how did you mitigate those perceived needs and the need for crossing the line?

Does the current environment change how you might approach things?

Feel free to add to things I might not have asked.

Thanks.
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destroy us. Nor can we tolerate it. We must attempt to destroy it as being the fully equipped and ardent enemy of the Truth by which men live. The duel is to the death.” - Hilaire Belloc, The Great Heresies
 
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Offline Heinrich

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Re: How to be poor?
« Reply #1 on: September 12, 2021, 03:33:52 PM »
That crappy studio had a great view. You are welcome here. The Traditional Catholic homesteading culture is a thing. I can put you in contact with some people. One’s a retired Lite Col, US Army.
Schaff Recht mir Gott und führe meine Sache gegen ein unheiliges Volk . . .   .                          
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Offline red solo cup

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Re: How to be poor?
« Reply #2 on: September 12, 2021, 05:20:45 PM »
I've been homeless and I've gone without food.  There was a time when if I wanted to eat I had to steal. I can tell you that a stick of butter will go up one sleeve and a box of spaghetti up the other.
First and foremost, hook up with a church. They almost always have an essentials closet where you can get toothpaste, t-paper, pads, clothing etc. Many have some sort of food pantry. Where I live the Methodist Church runs the Food Pantry. They will load you with canned goods, pasta and rice. Even frozen meats . They'll make you a PB and J or even a grilled cheese. Right now we're looking at a tidal wave of homelessness in Central Maine. The United Church of Christ (Congregationalists) has a woman who goes around with a VISA card and will fill your car's gas tank so the people living in their cars in the Walmart parking lot don't freeze at night. Last year the UCC gave out backpacks with food and a tent.
It's so bad they're considering stacking shipping containers in church parking lots. Once a month the USDA gives big boxes of food at the Episcopal Church. Have you heard of Farms to Families? Ivanka Trumps group. Once a month they go to different places and give out food. Info on that is available online. And my parish runs the Soup Kitchen. We don't just provide meals. We also give desserts, fresh produce and all the bread you can carry.
There's a Senior Center where you can get a full meal for 5 bucks. They have computers where you can fill out job applications. Classes to teach you how to balance a checkbook, how not to get scammed and how not to go into debt. When I was in school what they used to call Home Ecce.
Even the homeless shelter which is always full will give you a meal and let you shower. They've been using Covid money to put people up at the Budget Inn.
« Last Edit: September 12, 2021, 05:25:00 PM by red solo cup »
"It's so lonely 'round the fields of Athenry"
 
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Offline diaduit

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Re: How to be poor?
« Reply #3 on: September 12, 2021, 05:45:22 PM »
Practice now.

Try to cut back by 100 dollars per week.  Think longterm and shorterm.

What are your biggest expenses.  When my husband lost his business we were on social welfare while he retrained.  In Ireland SW is not too bad.  So I'll pm you probably tomorrow, what our costs were and how I saved.  I literally looked at every penny and didn't really think the big stuff until I had to.

Mortgage, could you sell your house and buy a site and put in a nice mobile home? Could you half your mortgage doing this?
Can you do interest only mortgage until you get back on your feet?
Can you move in with parents and rent out your home until you get back on your feet.
Do you know an elderly relative that needs looking after and you can live rent free to provide company and help?

Food, only cook dishes that do two to three days.  So lots of stews, bologneses, curries and pack with veg so that you don't miss the smaller portions of meat.  Can you get some chickens for your own eggs and they are wonderful for eating up scraps so you save on the cost of waste.
Look into homemade receipes for deodorants, laundry powder, floor cleaners etc.
Be merciless on tv, phone and broadband expenses.

Pull out excess stuff from around the house and sell on second hand platforms.  I got rid of a lot of stuff and probably covered our private health insurance for that year.
Order your food shopping online for delivery, that way you don't pick up stuff you don't need and you save on fuel for the car. Mine also twice year gives vouchers which I can boost to double value and use against my electricity bill.

Never use the dryer for clothes.  Go back to clothes line.

Try to pay bills in full and not monthly.  So for example car insurance...paying monthly means there is money leaving account once a month, well if you do this for house insurance, health insurance etc....something is always leaving your account. If you can pay in advance while you have money now, I would do that and take that headache out of the way. When your managing your monthly budget then, you're not trying to work around different payment schedules hitting the account.

Let the kids know so they can work with you.

Keep one luxury.  Ours was our holiday mobile in Co Clare which costs us in site fees every year.  I just couldn't part with it. Also I didn't let my health insurance go but I did go to a basic basic plan.

When is the mandate in ....can you save like mad now to tie you over a couple of months?

Do you have a private pension, can you borrow on the strength of that and sure you never know, apocalypse and all that and being locked out of the economy might have benefits  8).

I'll send you my expenses that year and you can factor in USA cost of living etc to see if you can get anything out of it.  However I don't think USA social welfare is as good as here.




 
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Offline Christe Eleison

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Re: How to be poor?
« Reply #4 on: September 12, 2021, 09:09:42 PM »
Dear Gardener,
I am very sorry for what you are going through  :grouphug: You & your family
are in our prayers! :pray3:

A couple of things, it seems that Montana is the only state to outlaw
vaccination as a
requirement for employment.
I am not sure about the TLM situation there.

And the there at least 20 states without a mandate, like South Carolina, Indiana, Florida, Georgia, Idaho, Montana, Wyoming, Oklahoma, Alabama, Tennessee, Nebraska, Texas, South Dakota, Arkansas, Arizona, Iowa, Missouri,
West Virginia, Utah.
The list is in this link:https://video.foxbusiness.com/v/6256180976001#sp=show-clips

South Dakota has a conservative Governor, and the FSSP is also there.

I do remember that the people in the Western part of Montana would
attend the TLM at the FSSP in Coeur D' Alene, Idaho. There is also an
SSPX in Post Falls Idaho as well.
Even prior to Benedict XVI Motu Propio, the people in North Idaho have always
had the TLM. The place is packed with Trads & they all help each other out.
Even with employment. I think they have every flavor, with some Sede Chapels as well.
A positive to the area, is that your children will be able to have friends
that have been brought up in the Faith. And in the future, maybe
even a spouse.
And no major type of natural disasters to worry about.
No hurricanes, no tornadoes, etc. You just have a volcano in WA state that
might go off in the future ;). And the place is a hunters dream, you can hunt,
fish, go bike riding, ski, etc. And people are nice, the place is gorgeous!
And it is a RED state!
The Bishop is in Boise, and he supposedly said that the FSSP in North Idaho
is safe, because they do not talk badly about Vatican II  ::), or something
along those lines...
The sad thing is that with so many people flocking to the area, the cost of
housing has gone up, the cost of living has gone up, but it is still much lower
compared to where you are at.  And you do not have to live in Coeur D' Alene
itself, but further away to keep your housing costs down.

It is a conservative area, where homeschooling is done without
having to report to anyone, no testing, no requirements, nothing!
It is super easy.
With a lot of conservative TRADS, conservative Mormons, super
conservative Evangelicals, the area will probably stay conservative
for the near future.
And the people in that area are super strong on their gun rights.
The area has a ton of conservative retired LEO's, military, etc. etc.
And again, they all help each other.

One thing to think about is that due to the Moratorium on rental
properties, now landlords are really strict on who they rent to.
And unless you arrive with a job, it will probably be hard to buy
another property.

So, it is probably advisable for you to stay where you are at, because at least
you have a roof over your head. And maybe you can spend time
looking for employment that can be done from home.
There are a lot of Trads that own businesses, so maybe speak with a couple
of priests that you know, and maybe one of them can put you in contact with
a possible position somewhere (that can also be done from home)

Prior to finding the ideal position, you could apply to tutor students
online, maybe? Maybe Heinrich, knows more about this.

The Kansas area also has a lot of Trad business owners, maybe speak
with the FSSP & SPPX priests there. 

I know that you do not want to live in Texas, but again, contact the
priests there with the FSSP in Dallas, in Tyler, TX. There might be
someone that can employ you to work from home.

The good part of you owning your home where you are at, is that
you can grow a ton of food, veggies, spices. Get some
chicks (like DIADUIT did) for eggs, meat.

I  will continue in another post, I do not want to lose this.
I keep getting logged off  :(

This titular question comes from plain ignorance. It doesn't come from malice or joking. I'm genuinely curious because, due to the vaccine mandates by the pudding eating Commander in Thief, this may be more reality than mental exercise in the near future... the very, very near future.

Background: I've done the poor thing before (well, I think so at least?) but I was single, fresh out of the Army, and my VA/Army retirement was able to pay for a very crappy studio apt ($500/mo at the time), basic food (maybe $200/mo), and I could do odd jobs when and how I wanted; in short, I was poor but not in a state of manic desperation. I didn't have to do food kitchens or contemplate crime. I somehow lived joyfully and very simply on something around <20k a year in the higher cost of living location of Colorado Springs. I even paid off a vehicle by scrimping and saving. I'd randomly force myself to go to bed hungry sometimes to "practice" in case it got worse, though I thought worse meant bad and at the time I thought I had it pretty darn good (which I did, compared to many). But I have no idea how to be that level of poor with kids, a 2021 mortgage, or in an environment that's not permissive to a rapidly unpopular mode of thinking with very little upward or even lateral mobility. It was a different time.

So tell me... if you have been, are, or are intimately connected with assisting or interacting with poor folks in the context of family and much higher cost of living: how do you, or they, do it? I want honest answers. If you are embarrassed by the reality, please PM me.

Tips?

Tricks?

What sort of things were lines in the sand for you and how did you mitigate those perceived needs and the need for crossing the line?

Does the current environment change how you might approach things?

Feel free to add to things I might not have asked.

Thanks.
 
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Offline Christe Eleison

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Re: How to be poor?
« Reply #5 on: September 12, 2021, 10:20:34 PM »
Gardener, :)

I do not know how the law works in your state regarding selling at a farmers market.

*Here is the link, so you can read it & maybe call the people in charge to find out.

*Look up the different farmers market in the area.
They typically are open on Wednesdays & Saturdays, some might work a
couple of nights a week. You do not have to be there the entire time
that they are open, you can sell only on Saturdays or what is convenient.
Again it varies according to each market & the state. When winter arrives,
some will go indoors.

The reason I am saying this, is that your wife could make different flavored jellies, jams, preserves, bake muffins, cookies, breads, etc.
Basically make things that do not have cheese, meats or whatever they claim that might require a license.  Read the link, because each state is different.

I have read that people in Kansas make a decent amount of money at the farmers market, and they have a lower cost of living, lower incomes compared to where you are at.
So, if that is the case, you could grow different herbs in the kitchen,
place them next to a window, sliding door (using book shelves) You guys
get a lot of sunshine, so it is an ideal growing place. People even grow
stuff over there in green houses in their back yards.

Items that are easy to grow, basil, oregano, rosemary, lavender,
different salad greens, spinach, tomatoes, cucumbers, potatoes,
broccoli, etc.

*So, basically you would contact the authorities (link), contact the different
farmers markets, ask what is required of you
. Sometimes you have to pay a
small fee to set up a table there. You get a pretty white & red checkered
table cloth  8), you place flowers on it.

You can even make it a family affair, you with your wife & children
behind the table is a sweet touch that attracts customers ;)

And you sell, cookies (different flavors, make sure to have some without
nuts for the peanut allergies, or avoid nuts all together),
cakes, pies, breads, jams, jellies, spices, pickles & or veggies
(that you grow on your property)

You could also sell flowers, potted plants that you cultivate on your property.

If you are dying to sell something that requires refrigeration or has other
restrictions, depending on the state, they may require you to make the
stuff in a commercial kitchen, usually Churches have commercial
kitchens that you can sign up for, pay a small fee for the use of the day.
Or obtain a license.
But to start off with, sell stuff that does not require a license.
Do not sell anything that requires refrigeration at all (dairy, meat, milk, etc.)

Phone: 303-692-3645, option 2.
Email: cdphe_mfgfd@state.co.us.

Please read the information in the link:

"The Cottage Foods Act allows limited types of food products that are non-potentially hazardous (do not require refrigeration for safety) to be sold directly to consumers without licensing or inspection."

"What type of foods are eligible?

Foods that are non-potentially hazardous, or in other words, do not require refrigeration for safety.

"This includes pickled fruits and vegetables with a finished equilibrium pH of 4.6 or below, spices, teas, dehydrated produce, nuts, seeds, honey, jams, jellies, preserves, fruit butter, flour, and baked goods, including candies, fruit empanadas, tortillas and other similar products that do not require refrigeration for safety. Up to 250 dozen whole eggs per month may also be sold."

https://cdphe.colorado.gov/cottage-foods-act

Besides calling up the different farmers markets, the people in the link,
the chamber of commerce, remember that around November or so,
a lot of them go indoors to another location. Visit them to get an idea
of what people are charging for cookies, cakes, jams, etc.
That way you can price your items accordingly.

 :pray1:
 
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Offline Christe Eleison

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Re: How to be poor?
« Reply #6 on: September 12, 2021, 11:53:27 PM »
HOME STORAGE CENTERS,

Since the new administration took over, food prices have
gone up across the board. :(

So, even if you buy some bulk items now for your food storage,
you will be saving a lot of money, by buying in bulk & because
things keep going up. You end up saving twice as much.

This is a lot cheaper & healthier to do compared to buying MRE's.

The information from this post is concerning services available from the LDS
or Mormons. It is NOT Catholic.

I have read that a lot of people will drive to the LDS cannery stations or
home storage centers, because the savings are amazing.

They supposedly lend you the canning device that you can use to seal &
store your food items that you buy in bulk from them. Or they will can it
for you. It might not be available in all centers.

A lot of people just order from them online.

If you happen to visit them in person, they will not try to convert you,
they will just ask you if you would like someone from the nearest "ward"
to visit you. You say NO, and they do not bother you at all.
You might want to call up their nearest church location to get details of the
closest home storage centers. Here are some links that might help.

https://providentliving.churchofjesuschrist.org/self-reliance/home-storage-centers?lang=eng

https://providentliving.churchofjesuschrist.org/self-reliance/food-storage/home-storage-center-locations-map?lang=eng

https://providentliving.churchofjesuschrist.org/find-a-welfare-location?lang=eng

EMPLOYMENT SERVICES:

https://www.latterdaysaintjobs.org/ers/ct/?intl=&lang=eng

https://www.latterdaysaintjobs.org/ers/ct/articles/suddenly-without-a-job?lang=eng

Job postings:

Click on the link & if you want you can register & get access to lots of
job listings

https://www.latterdaysaintjobs.org/ers/ct/landing/job-seeker?lang=eng

What foods are available at LDS cannery centers?

These centers help the volunteers, church members, and even non-members
to build a primary food supply for their long-term needs. Some of the products available are dry beans, rice, and wheat. Amazingly, the items are also available through their online store.

Black Beans
White Beans
Refried Beans
Carrots
Onions
Food Items Available in #10 cans & Pouches:
Fruit Drink Mix
Regular Oats
Quick Oats
Powdered Milk
Hot Cocoa Mix
Sugar, Macaroni
Spaghetti Bites
Apple Slices
White Rice
White Wheat
Hard Red Wheat
White Flour
Pancake Mix
Pinto Beans
Potato Pearls
Potato Flakes

These are some of the storage centers:

Lethbridge, Alberta, Canada
Mesa, Arizona
Boise, Idaho                                                     
Idaho Falls, Idaho
Carrollton, Texas
Lindon, Utah
Logan, Utah
Ogden, Utah
Salt Lake City, Utah (Welfare Square)
Sandy, Utah
Springville, Utah
St. George, Utah

Center prices & locations:

https://providentliving.churchofjesuschrist.org/food-storage/home-storage-center-locations-map?lang=eng

God Bless you & your loved ones, Gardener!  :pray3:

 :grouphug:
 
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Offline Christe Eleison

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Re: How to be poor?
« Reply #7 on: September 13, 2021, 01:47:50 AM »
Gardener, :)

Have you had Covid, since this entire fiasco began?

There is a University Professor, in Virginia that sued, to avoid the vax. His reason was that he had immunity due to having been sick with Covid. He won!
He works with George Mason University.

https://nypost.com/2021/08/04/professor-who-had-covid-sues-george-mason-university-over-mandate/

Also, from what I have read, the common theme, is DO NOT QUIT, let  them fire you & give you a termination letter. Keep showing up to work.
Supposedly, that will help for unemployment benefits. In addition, if
there is some sort of law suit later on. You will be able to benefit from it.

Obviously, prior to all of this, try to obtain a Religious & or a Conscience
exemption. And if possible, try for a medical exemption as well.

Right now it's just a directive to develop an order.

Employers are NOT required to do ANYTHING until a rule has been placed.
PERIOD!

Any possibility of working from home, to be able to avoid the vax?

"The hospitals are "overwhelmed" because they keep "firing" people. Yet won't hand out termination letters because they know they can get sued."

https://twitter.com/Chesschick01/status/1437030172298027012?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw%7Ctwcamp%5Etweetembed%7Ctwterm%5E1437030172298027012%7Ctwgr%5E%7Ctwcon%5Es1_&ref_url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.thegatewaypundit.com%2F2021%2F09%2Fkentucky-health-care-workers-refused-comply-vaccine-mandate-forced-hospital-fire-videos%2F

By refusing to quit and showing up for work, the women will have more options available when it comes to potential lawsuits and unemployment.

'There are currently massive staff shortages at hospitals across the country, leading the American Hospital Association to express concerns about the impending federal requirement for all healthcare staff to get the COVID-19 vaccine.'

 :pray3:
 
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Offline Obrien

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Re: How to be poor?
« Reply #8 on: September 13, 2021, 03:59:10 AM »
Tagging it for myself so I can comment later.
 
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Offline Christe Eleison

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Grocery prices headed higher! How to be poor?
« Reply #9 on: September 13, 2021, 01:15:16 PM »
I think we all knew this! :(

May God Help Us ALL!!

 :pray2: :pray3:


Beef prices have risen 14% this year while pork prices have jumped 12.1%, and poultry prices are up 6.6%.

https://www.foxbusiness.com/economy/grocery-prices-to-rise-kroger

By Jonathan Garber FOXBusiness


Grocery prices are headed higher later this year, according the U.S.’s largest supermarket by sales.
 
Cincinnati-based Kroger Co., which had $132 billion in sales last year, says inflation is running hotter than management previously anticipated and that expectations are now for prices to rise 2% to 3% over the second half of this year.

Kroger is "passing along higher cost to the customer where it makes sense to do so," said CFO Gary Millerchip on the company’s second-quarter earnings call on Friday.
Management at Kroger rival Albertsons Companies Inc. earlier this summer expressed similar concerns that inflation would pick up in the second half of the year and that they too would pass some of those increased costs along to consumers.

Further increases at the checkout counter would put further pressure on consumers who are already dealing with the biggest annual increase in consumer prices since August 2008.
 
Within the consumer price index, the component for food at home has risen six months in a row and is up 2.6% this year.
 
Half of the basket’s price increase is due to soaring prices for beef, pork and poultry. Beef prices have risen 14% this year while pork prices have jumped 12.1%, and poultry prices are higher by 6.6%.
 
Prices were up in five of the six major grocery store food groups in July, falling only for fruits and vegetables. The category saw prices dip 0.9% after rising 0.7% in June.
 
The Federal Reserve has said the price increases that have occurred in the wake of COVID-19 are "transitory" and that those pressures will subside as the supply-chain disruptions are resolved.

The Biden administration, however, says issues the supply-chain issues caused by COVID-19 and increased demand are only partly to blame.

Instead the administration blames what they say is a lack of competition in meat processing.

"Just four large conglomerates control the majority of the market for each of these three products [beef, pork and poultry], and the data show that these companies have been raising prices while generating record profits during the pandemic," said National Economic Council Director Brian Deese at a press briefing on Wednesday.
 
The administration is "taking bold action to enforce the antitrust laws, boost competition in meat-processing, and push back on pandemic profiteering that is hurting consumers, farmers and ranchers across the country," Deese said.

Whether or not the administration’s efforts will rein in price gains remains to be seen.

In the meantime, customers looking for savings at the grocery store could opt for private label brands.

"If you go back to prior times when you had inflation, the customer, a lot of times, would trade over to our brands as part of their structuring their budget," Kroger CEO William McMullen said. "We're not seeing budget changes on our brands happening at this point, but I'm sure if inflation continued."

Video in link ^^^^

 :pray3:


 
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Offline Christe Eleison

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Re: How to be poor?
« Reply #10 on: September 13, 2021, 01:37:04 PM »
My humble opinion & advice for what it is worth:

* We all need to make our own yogurt & kefir. It is easy & inexpensive!

* Grow our own herbs, spices, etc.

* Grow what we can in our back yards, or next to a window, balcony if living in an apt.

* Some TRAD parishes, will have people bring in their excess from
  their gardens or farms, to share with other parishioners, FOR FREE!

* Some areas will have a pick your own berries, tomatoes, etc. For
   a much lower price compared to grocery stores, farmers markets, etc.

 * Find a local farmer, that you can buy from directly!

 * Join someone else in your parish, or more people and buy a cow.
   Get it butchered & divide amongst the group. Eliminating the middle man.

* If you like to eat pork, do the same as above ^^^

* Get your own chicks, for eggs & meat!

* Stop buying packaged stuff, in a box, bag, bottle or container!

* Make your own bread, baked goods, it is cheaper & healthier this way!

* Buy wheat berries directly from a farmer, you grind what you need when
  going to bake. This lasts longer compared to the ready to use flour in stores.
  It is cheaper & healthier as well! Obtain an inexpensive grinder NOW,
  before prices go up. It can even be a coffee grinder.
  You should have one anyway, for coffee, one for spices, one for wheat berries.
   I bought one online for $20 Dollars. I use it to grind flax seeds,
   because flax seeds will oxidize within a short period of time, so it is best NOT
   to buy a bag of ground flax, but the seeds instead.

* If you cannot grow anything in your apt. or house, for whatever reason,
   find the neighborhood plot, that you can rent. A lot of towns
   have this. It is not expensive to do so. Every town has different prices,
   different plot sizes.
   You are able to rent a small plot along with other people, and you grow
   whatever you want to feed your family!

*  If you own your house, try to rent out small plots to others that might
    want to grow food. This is a way to generate extra income for your family.
    You just have to agree on what days they come on to your property, for
    maintenance, and to pick up their harvest!
    Advertise in your Church bulletin & tell them they can even have a
    small greenhouse on the plot they rent from you, for the winter.
    Advertise in your Trad parish, Novus Ordo parish, and even in the
    protestant churches, etc. Leave fliers on car windows, etc. Get
    creative to get the word out.
    The house you own should be useful to grow food for your family,
    to consume & sell. To grow flowers, plants to SELL!!
    To rent out plots to a couple of people to generate income.



May God Help Us ALL!!

 :pray2: :pray3:
 
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Offline Christe Eleison

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Re: How to be poor?
« Reply #11 on: September 13, 2021, 02:46:10 PM »
Also, if you own your own home with several garages.

You can rent out 1 of your garage spaces, either to someone that
wants to park their car, SUV, boat, whatever. Or maybe they just need
extra storage space.

Ideally this would be a garage space that is not connected to your house,
or that if it is connected, that you can lock that door really well,
maybe even put a gate on the inside just case.

Again, advertise in your parish, other nearby parishes, etc.

Some people might leave for the winter & they might need a place to store their camper, RV, boat or whatever.

It could be someone that has a car that they love but their place has
off street parking, but they want their vehicle protected during the winter, etc.

Look on Craigslist, to see what the going rate is for the same space, and
then charge a bit less to make yourself attractive.

Obviously, this is to generate some income for your family.

God Bless! :pray3:
 
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Offline Christe Eleison

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Re: How to be poor?
« Reply #12 on: September 13, 2021, 05:35:54 PM »
I've been homeless and I've gone without food.  There was a time when if I wanted to eat I had to steal. I can tell you that a stick of butter will go up one sleeve and a box of spaghetti up the other.
First and foremost, hook up with a church. They almost always have an essentials closet where you can get toothpaste, t-paper, pads, clothing etc. Many have some sort of food pantry. Where I live the Methodist Church runs the Food Pantry. They will load you with canned goods, pasta and rice. Even frozen meats . They'll make you a PB and J or even a grilled cheese. Right now we're looking at a tidal wave of homelessness in Central Maine. The United Church of Christ (Congregationalists) has a woman who goes around with a VISA card and will fill your car's gas tank so the people living in their cars in the Walmart parking lot don't freeze at night. Last year the UCC gave out backpacks with food and a tent.
It's so bad they're considering stacking shipping containers in church parking lots. Once a month the USDA gives big boxes of food at the Episcopal Church. Have you heard of Farms to Families? Ivanka Trumps group. Once a month they go to different places and give out food. Info on that is available online. And my parish runs the Soup Kitchen. We don't just provide meals. We also give desserts, fresh produce and all the bread you can carry.
There's a Senior Center where you can get a full meal for 5 bucks. They have computers where you can fill out job applications. Classes to teach you how to balance a checkbook, how not to get scammed and how not to go into debt. When I was in school what they used to call Home Ecce.
Even the homeless shelter which is always full will give you a meal and let you shower. They've been using Covid money to put people up at the Budget Inn.

Dear Red Solo Cup, :seeya:
Thank you for this amazing post! :thumbsup: May God Bless you, SIR!!  :toth: :pray3:
I truly appreciate the time that you spend helping others! You have my respect!

It saddens me to hear that all of this is happening in Maine. I love New England,
and Maine & New Hampshire hold a special place in my heart!
I also like the physical beauty of Vermont & MA, I just do not care for their politics...

Some of the best times that I had in College, was working at the soup kitchen,
sorting out the clothes, personal hygiene products,
making peanut butter sandwiches, soup, cookies, etc.
And finally delivering it all over town.

What was so much fun was to be able to work along people of
different ages, grandmas would stop by with their grandchildren & work side by
side as their "special night together" :) And of course, the look on
peoples faces when you provided them with the goods,
was just priceless! :pray2:
We had to deliver a lot of the items, because some people will never stop by for help.

I am so sorry that you had to suffer the way you did, when you were homeless! :-[
Thanks for your honesty, for sharing your story with us. :grouphug:

It can happen to anyone of us! May God Bless you, RSC!  :pray3:
 
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Offline Christina_S

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Re: How to be poor?
« Reply #13 on: September 14, 2021, 09:40:50 AM »
I feel this. When we got married two years ago, my husband had a year left in his degree and I had two left in the one I had just been accepted for (really wish I hadn't done it, but that's another story). He was working for a Catholic diocese and I worked at the university library. Our first daughter was born nine months and a week into our marriage. Now my husband is back in school to wrap up an MA and doctorate in Theology. I have a freelance job of proofreading and editing online, but that's it at the moment. Things are tight and we're always looking for ways to tighten the proverbial belt.

I think the thing we've struggled with most is contentment at any stage of the journey. I've lost count of the number of times we've been at the grocery store and thought, "Golly, wouldn't it be nice to have this for dinner sometime," and then kept walking forlornly because an ingredient was too expensive. It can be really hard if you're dragging yourself by the collar down to the miserable pit of poverty, but if you keep thinking about your end goal (whether it be holiness, freedom from the system, self-sufficiency, sustainability, healthier living, etc.), life becomes less painful. There's a book by Dubay called "Happy are You Poor" that was immensely helpful for me.

We're able to do a number of things that lighten the load a bit. A lot of it will be similar to Christe's wonderful recommendations.
    -I find free apples every fall and freeze/can enough applesauce to last the whole year.
    -In the summer, I find berries at local parks that are free for the taking. These are frozen or turned into jam.
    -Lately, I learned how to make my own yogurt at home. Next related goal: cheese!
    -Baking my own bread has been a delightful learning curve, and I make sourdough occasionally to change things up.
    -I started growing my own herbs indoors. (Today, Roodmas, is apparently the day for the customary blessing of basil!)
    -I did keep a small container garden this summer with some tomatoes and peppers, but we want a home with a legit garden in the next couple years. Also, this is Canada. The growing season kinda sucks.
    -Keep track of when sales happen and stock up on items then. We just moved across the country, but back in Edmonton, we shopped at a local produce place that had wildly cheap products, dollar store for some dry goods and household items, and Wal-Mart for almost everything else. Now and then, there were two other stores we would go to, but it was just for a couple specific items. If you know the local drug store sells eggs for $2.49 a dozen but only on Saturdays and Sundays (true story), mark it on your calendar!
    -Books/movies are borrowed from the library and rarely purchased.
    -If we need something for the house, we usually check the dollar store or the thrift shop first and wait it out if we can. Recently we purchased curtains and some kitchen essentials for a fraction of the price we would have paid at Wal-Mart.
    -Clothes are a similar story: thrift shop or hand-me-downs from family and friends. Wear it till it's worn out, and then turn it into rags and use it more  ;D
    -My daughter's favourite toys are very simple. No toys with batteries allowed in this house.
    -If you've got friends, be generous with them. Give them frozen meals, a hand with yardwork, free babysitting: you reap what you sow.
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Offline Christina_S

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Re: How to be poor?
« Reply #14 on: September 14, 2021, 09:45:37 AM »
Oh, and one other point: lately we've been mentally and physically preparing for excrement to hit the rotating blades. We're stocking up on essentials and putting together an evacuation bag. I know it's not the easiest thing to do when money is already scarce, but it's become necessary for our peace of mind and given that we live in the province with arguably the worst, ahem, virus-related restrictions, it's not a bad idea.
"You cannot be a half-saint; you must be a whole saint or no saint at all." ~St. Therese of Lisieux

Check out the blog that I run with my husband!
Latest posts: - Am I Third?
- The Woman Is the Heart of the Home
- A Brief History of Residential Schools


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