Author Topic: Morality of buying expensive things  (Read 992 times)

Offline ChristusRex

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Re: Morality of buying expensive things
« Reply #30 on: March 18, 2021, 01:16:27 PM »
Hmm @TandJ if you are looking for a good book on our Faith I recommend the Spirago. Very good. Sorry @ChristusRex, I misunderstood your tone. Easy to do with just text and no voice.  :)

No worries. Sorry, I’m sure it read as being quite abrasive. I was trying to be firm in my advice because the scrupulous need straightforward advice without any doubt.
The Lord our God from tree doth reign
 
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Offline TandJ

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Re: Morality of buying expensive things
« Reply #31 on: March 18, 2021, 01:20:38 PM »
So how do I form my conscience in the meanwhile? My priest doesn’t have time to answer every thing I ask about... and books can be hit or miss or not have the answers. I’m not trying to be a pain.

The puppy is very sweet and we are happy we got her
 
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Offline Melkor

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Re: Morality of buying expensive things
« Reply #32 on: March 18, 2021, 01:49:35 PM »
Well, until you can get everything sorted out with your priest, I would advise reading a catechism and form your conscience off of that. Never hurts to pick up a good spiritual book to quell your scruples and bring peace to your soul. I recommend Introduction to the Devout Life by Francis de Sales and Imitation of Christ by Thomas A Kempis. Also, if you are 'scruping out' about minor issues, remember it is a venial sin even if you are guilty. And also, being too scrupulous is a sin too. :) I will pray for you.
« Last Edit: March 18, 2021, 01:51:08 PM by Melkor »
All that is gold does not glitter, not all those who wander are lost.

"Let a man walk ten miles steadily on a hot summer's day along a dusty English road, and he will soon discover why beer was invented."

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Offline Gardener

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Re: Morality of buying expensive things
« Reply #33 on: March 18, 2021, 02:11:43 PM »
Well, until you can get everything sorted out with your priest, I would advise reading a catechism and form your conscience off of that. Never hurts to pick up a good spiritual book to quell your scruples and bring peace to your soul. I recommend Introduction to the Devout Life by Francis de Sales and Imitation of Christ by Thomas A Kempis. Also, if you are 'scruping out' about minor issues, remember it is a venial sin even if you are guilty. And also, being too scrupulous is a sin too. :) I will pray for you.

Certain spiritual works might actually be harmful depending on one's temperament. Things like the Imitation can throw a Melancholic into a tailspin, whereas a Choleric needs such works.

I attached a copy of Fr. Kappes' articles on the temperaments in this post:
https://www.suscipedomine.com/forum/index.php?topic=19629.msg435033#msg435033
« Last Edit: March 18, 2021, 02:16:35 PM by Gardener »
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destroy us. Nor can we tolerate it. We must attempt to destroy it as being the fully equipped and ardent enemy of the Truth by which men live. The duel is to the death.” - Hilaire Belloc, The Great Heresies
 
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Offline mikemac

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Re: Morality of buying expensive things
« Reply #34 on: March 18, 2021, 02:30:28 PM »
If you decide to read Imitation of Christ by Thomas A Kempis this digital version has the same Practical Reflections and Prayers after each chapter as my hard copy.

http://www.catholictradition.org/Classics/christ2.htm

By the way, the correct name of the book is 'The Following of Christ'.  'Imitation of Christ' is part of the title of the first chapter, which a lot of people call it now.
Like John Vennari (RIP) said "Why not just do it?  What would it hurt?"
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Offline Melkor

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Re: Morality of buying expensive things
« Reply #35 on: March 18, 2021, 03:31:57 PM »
@Gardener yeah I see your point. My sanguine self needs some strictness once in a while. Not everyone is the same.
All that is gold does not glitter, not all those who wander are lost.

"Let a man walk ten miles steadily on a hot summer's day along a dusty English road, and he will soon discover why beer was invented."

G.K. Chesterton
 

Offline Lynne

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Re: Morality of buying expensive things
« Reply #36 on: March 18, 2021, 05:20:20 PM »
So how do I form my conscience in the meanwhile? My priest doesn’t have time to answer every thing I ask about... and books can be hit or miss or not have the answers. I’m not trying to be a pain.

The puppy is very sweet and we are happy we got her

Yes, books can be hit or miss but what did not appeal to a person at one point can be more edifying down the road.

Relax. Don't overthink things. If you could afford the puppy, i.e. not go into debt and not skip required payments, you're fine. A pet is a wonderful addition to a family.
In conclusion, I can leave you with no better advice than that given after every sermon by Msgr Vincent Giammarino, who was pastor of St Michael’s Church in Atlantic City in the 1950s:

    “My dear good people: Do what you have to do, When you’re supposed to do it, The best way you can do it,   For the Love of God. Amen.”
 
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