Author Topic: Crisis of Conscience: Can I ever go back to the NO?  (Read 2397 times)

Offline Stubborn

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Re: Crisis of Conscience: Can I ever go back to the NO?
« Reply #105 on: June 29, 2020, 07:23:08 AM »
For now, the SSPX allows me to meet my religious obligations without sacrificing any Catholic principle.  

Just as for other people on this forum, their current worship practices similarly allow them to meet their religious obligations without sacrificing any Catholic principles.

I'm speaking not even mainly of Heinrich and me, but of the OP and many others who have not posted here.  This is why the OP titled the thread Crisis of Conscience.  It's his conscience, not your conscience and not my or Heinrich's conscience. Even the Roman Catholic Church, both pre- and post-V2, respects the conscience of the individual Catholic more than you sometimes appear to do.

Sorry Miriam, but the conscience of the OP is in need of correcting because like most of the world, his mind has been altered. It is apparent that you do not understand the Catholic principle involved, but in reality it is very simple, basic Catholicism - of which the conciliar church is anything but, which is why the OP's conscience is in need of correction, not some form of liberal understanding from those who think they "know better," but whose advise offers no hope whatsoever of correcting it. 

Would Pope St. Pius X have established a Modernist apostolate within the Church? No, certainly not - why? because Modernism, which is the synthesis of the NO, in and of itself is a great evil and gravely sinful and draws in the weak and those in need of correction, which is to say anyone with a crisis of conscience regarding abandoning the NO is in need of straight Catholic teaching, clear answers and reliable catechesis from those who are supposed to know better. All of this in order for the OP to  settle his confused conscience. That's the way to show respect for his conscience, by actually trying to help the man steer himself toward the true faith and away from the modernist new faith of the NO.
     
 
Even after a long life of sin, if the Christian receives the Sacrament of the dying with the appropriate dispositions, he will go straight to heaven without having to go to purgatory. - Fr. M. Philipon; This sacrament prepares man for glory immediately, since it is given to those who are departing from this life. - St. Thomas Aquinas; It washes away the sins that remain to be atoned, and the vestiges of sin; it comforts and strengthens the soul of the sick person, arousing in him a great trust and confidence in the divine mercy. Thus strengthened, he bears the hardships and struggles of his illness more easily and resists the temptation of the devil and the heel of the deceiver more readily; and if it be advantageous to the welfare of his soul, he sometimes regains his bodily health. - Council of Trent
 
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Offline Miriam_M

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Re: Crisis of Conscience: Can I ever go back to the NO?
« Reply #106 on: June 29, 2020, 11:43:00 AM »
For now, the SSPX allows me to meet my religious obligations without sacrificing any Catholic principle.  

Just as for other people on this forum, their current worship practices similarly allow them to meet their religious obligations without sacrificing any Catholic principles.

I'm speaking not even mainly of Heinrich and me, but of the OP and many others who have not posted here.  This is why the OP titled the thread Crisis of Conscience.  It's his conscience, not your conscience and not my or Heinrich's conscience. Even the Roman Catholic Church, both pre- and post-V2, respects the conscience of the individual Catholic more than you sometimes appear to do.

Sorry Miriam, but the conscience of the OP is in need of correcting because like most of the world, his mind has been altered. It is apparent that you do not understand the Catholic principle involved, but in reality it is very simple, basic Catholicism - of which the conciliar church is anything but, which is why the OP's conscience is in need of correction, not some form of liberal understanding from those who think they "know better," but whose advise offers no hope whatsoever of correcting it. 

Would Pope St. Pius X have established a Modernist apostolate within the Church? No, certainly not - why? because Modernism, which is the synthesis of the NO, in and of itself is a great evil and gravely sinful and draws in the weak and those in need of correction, which is to say anyone with a crisis of conscience regarding abandoning the NO is in need of straight Catholic teaching, clear answers and reliable catechesis from those who are supposed to know better. All of this in order for the OP to  settle his confused conscience. That's the way to show respect for his conscience, by actually trying to help the man steer himself toward the true faith and away from the modernist new faith of the NO.
   

Several of us have tried to do that.  Maybe our approach is one he finds more to his liking, but you would have to ask him that.  The reason I mention this, brother, is that each of us, not just the OP, must come to this point, guided by information and the light of the Holy Spirit, through prayer, yes.  I do not object at all to your providing him resources, nor Max, nor Michael Wilson providing those, though others were perhaps more "absolute" than what some of us suggested.  This is why I have said for years and will repeat again:  I have never condemned sedevacantists for their position, especially because all popes since the Council, whether they are popes in quotation marks or not, are preaching a false religion, whatever they privately believe, simply from the fact that they preach a 58-year-old religion and not a 2,020 year old religion.  There is no such thing as a 58-year-old Catholicism:  it's an invention and therefore a lie.  One of our forum members said it a couple of years ago, I think:  most trads are practical sedes. I know I am; I have known that for a while now.

The state of the Church made this (individual conscience) true & necessary prior to Corona and suppression of the Sacraments universally.  It is even more true now. I do not find much to recommend in terms of the celebration of the Christian life during what I consider an absolutely perverse and evil 2020, a true dystopia still unfolding. However, there are a couple of victories that I think have occurred for fervent Catholics everywhere:  clear, hard choices in our own lives, with whatever choices we do and do not have.  Or let's put it this way:  It has made clear or is making clear what an individual Catholic's priorities are:  If any Mass, real or false, is the most important thing to you -- restoring what you previously had, in the setting in which it previously was -- then you, whoever you are, are really suffering right now and you may suffer at least as much in the near future, whenever your local "reopening" occurs because the future is not terribly secure, and because what you come back to may disappoint.

I have seen the landscape changing everywhere I look.  Shuttering churches has created a diaspora among practicing Catholics and reshuffled the deck -- not just geographically, but spiritually. Some people are now willing to come out of the closet into full-on SV.  (They attended Mass with me at my old parish.) Others are traveling 2 hours to seek a beautifully celebrated TLM because their local one, under a different bishop, has been suppressed.  Others have finally (as some of us have been urging them IRL) abandoned a compulsion to attend the N.O.M. "for a sense of community, even though I know it's an inferior Mass."
 :banghead:

And speaking of that, this is revealing who was more attached to human beings and a particular location than to God -- including a large segment of those who exclusively attend the TLM and have for years.  They haven't yet exhaled because they're "waiting" for their local Mass to be restored and have, i.m.o., a false loyalty to a parish instead of to true worship and to God.  I have a friend who is more attached to her "old parish" that she has attended for maybe 20 years than to a parish she has not attended but is farther away.  The far-away exclusive TLM parish has been restored. Her mixed parish has not.  Why is she not willing to explore new possibilities?  False attachment, that's why.

Her own parish -- one I'm well acquainted with -- is falling apart, given 4 months of abandonment and the opportunity for the diocesan priest to further destroy the Latin Mass community there. (He is succeeding; the departure of disgusted trads there continues.)

In just 4 short months, I have negative-on-the-number-line attachment to my previous parish.  In many ways, it no longer exists for me.  I am ashamed of what it has become under a repressive, militaristic bishop who is gleefully watching deflated trads disperse. It is unlikely that the TLM there will survive this, i.m.o., for reasons I cannot discuss publicly.

Anyway, being willing to explore and sacrifice has merely intensified my own convictions and made me more fearless.  I have encouraged others, fleeing the parish or being tempted to, to also follow their convictions.  There's a good way to be obedient and a horrible way to be obedient -- being obedient for all the wrong reasons.  If you need more details, you can PM me.
 
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