Author Topic: What are you working on?  (Read 2025 times)

Offline Jayne

  • Mary Garden
  • Major
  • ****
  • Posts: 13162
  • Thanked: 5367 times
  • Comic Sans FrontiŤres
  • Religion: Roman Catholic
Re: What are you working on?
« Reply #45 on: April 26, 2020, 03:29:45 PM »
I made my own hand cream.  I had a lot of tallow that I had saved from a very fatty batch of beef broth.  It was more than I could use up in food within a reasonable time so I decided to make something else.  I strained it really well and mixed it with some tea tree oil.  I have been using if for a while.  Yesterday, my husband was suffering from dry hands  (probably from so much hand washing) and asked me if I had anything for it.  He was a bit dubious about using my homemade hand cream, but he tried it and says that it helped.  I feel like a real pioneer woman now.

Jesus, meek and humble of heart, make my heart like unto Thine.
 
The following users thanked this post: maryslittlegarden, Lynne, Padraig, MundaCorMeum, queen.saints

Offline Lynne

  • happy to be Catholic!
  • Mary Garden
  • Hauptmann
  • ****
  • Posts: 9537
  • Thanked: 4338 times
  • We're all special snowflakes
  • Religion: Catholic (SSPX)
Re: What are you working on?
« Reply #46 on: April 26, 2020, 04:27:55 PM »

These look amazing (and you had me at bacon grease) but I saw the bakers attempt to make these on The Great British Bake Off and it was not easy...

And I hope no one uses margarine (or Crisco) in their baking anymore.

The pictures below are the first ones I made back in 2016. They certainly wouldnít have gotten past Paul Hollywood, but it was just such a sigh of relief when the little discs of dough actually slid into cone shapes as promised.

Beautiful!!! I'm sure they tasted as good as they look.

In conclusion, I can leave you with no better advice than that given after every sermon by Msgr Vincent Giammarino, who was pastor of St Michaelís Church in Atlantic City in the 1950s:

    ďMy dear good people: Do what you have to do, When youíre supposed to do it, The best way you can do it,   For the Love of God. Amen.Ē
 
The following users thanked this post: queen.saints

Offline Bernadette

  • Mary Garden
  • Hauptmann
  • ****
  • Posts: 9507
  • Thanked: 4974 times
  • Religion: Roman Catholic
Re: What are you working on?
« Reply #47 on: April 28, 2020, 08:55:48 AM »
Iím getting ready to cut down a duvet cover and finally sew the binding on my most recent quilt, both projects have languished on my to-do list for years. The quilt is one that I made on a whim out of random pieces of fabric; I call it a postcard quilt, since itís made of 4Ē squares, with no two the same. Like a postage stamp quilt (which Iím also making), but bigger pieces.
"Make merry, and be glad: for this thy brother was dead, and is come to life again; he was lost, and is found."
 
The following users thanked this post: Jayne, Lynne, MundaCorMeum, queen.saints

Offline MundaCorMeum

  • Mary Garden
  • Feldwebel
  • ***
  • Posts: 4594
  • Thanked: 4531 times
  • Religion: Catholic
Re: What are you working on?
« Reply #48 on: April 30, 2020, 09:20:28 PM »
I made my own hand cream.  I had a lot of tallow that I had saved from a very fatty batch of beef broth.  It was more than I could use up in food within a reasonable time so I decided to make something else.  I strained it really well and mixed it with some tea tree oil.  I have been using if for a while.  Yesterday, my husband was suffering from dry hands  (probably from so much hand washing) and asked me if I had anything for it.  He was a bit dubious about using my homemade hand cream, but he tried it and says that it helped.  I feel like a real pioneer woman now.



Can you elaborate on the process?  We raise our own beef, and I always get stock bones, but I didn't realize I could get tallow (not sure what that is, though I've heard the term before) from making stock....and then make hand cream from it.  Does it smell?
 
The following users thanked this post: queen.saints

Offline Jayne

  • Mary Garden
  • Major
  • ****
  • Posts: 13162
  • Thanked: 5367 times
  • Comic Sans FrontiŤres
  • Religion: Roman Catholic
Re: What are you working on?
« Reply #49 on: May 01, 2020, 12:48:49 PM »
Can you elaborate on the process?  We raise our own beef, and I always get stock bones, but I didn't realize I could get tallow (not sure what that is, though I've heard the term before) from making stock....and then make hand cream from it.  Does it smell?

Tallow just means rendered beef (or mutton) fat.  If you have your own animals you might be interested in the dry rendering method: https://www.theprairiehomestead.com/2012/02/how-to-render-beef-tallow.html  I've never done this, but I get enough from broth.

The heat used in making broth also renders fat. This is the wet method.  When one chills the broth, the fat hardens in a layer on top and is easily removed.  Melt this hardened fat and then strain it through cheesecloth.  (I have also used a disposable coffee filter but it was more difficult to use.)  Here are some detailed instructions: https://whatgreatgrandmaate.com/how-to-save-the-fat-from-bone-broth/

The author above says to boil off the water in the liquid fat at low heat.  This step is is for making the tallow last longer (months) and makes refrigeration optional.  This makes sense because removing water content normally has a preservative effect.  I skip it because I make small batches that I keep in the fridge and use quickly. I think this step also makes it harder and is done when making tallow candles (which I do not recommend).

Tallow does not smell good when heated, like in the dry rendering process or when used in candles.  (In stories I've read which mention tallow candles people are always complaining about how bad they smell.)  But the processed tallow at room or body temperature does not have a strong smell and it does not bother most people.  Since I add tea tree oil to mine, its smell masks the tallow's.  I add the tea tree oil for its anti-bacterial, anti-fungal, etc. properties.  You could probably add another essential oil to give it a more pleasant scent.

The sites I've linked to mention its nutritional benefits when eaten, but tallow (like all animal fats) is also good for skin.  Here is a commercial site for selling tallow beauty products: https://nefertemnaturals.com/blogs/news/5-reasons-to-use-tallow-on-your-skin.   It is good as a moisturizer and soothes dry, itchy, irritated skin.  Do not use it on fresh burns because greasy substances trap heat.  Burns need clean cool water.

« Last Edit: May 01, 2020, 01:13:02 PM by Jayne »
Jesus, meek and humble of heart, make my heart like unto Thine.
 
The following users thanked this post: MundaCorMeum, queen.saints

Offline coffeeandcigarette

  • Mary Garden
  • Korporal
  • **
  • Posts: 261
  • Thanked: 164 times
Re: What are you working on?
« Reply #50 on: May 01, 2020, 12:56:21 PM »


The author above says to boil off the water in the liquid fat at low heat.  This step is is for making the tallow last longer (months) and makes refrigeration optional.  This makes sense because removing water content normally has a preservative effect.  I skip it because I make small batches that I keep in the fridge and use quickly. I think this step also makes it harder and is done when making tallow candles (which I do not recommend).

Tallow does not smell good when heated, like in the dry rendering process or when used in candles.  (In stories I've read which mention tallow candles people are always complaining about how bad they smell.)  But the processed tallow at room or body temperature does not have a strong smell and it does not bother most people.  Since I add tea tree oil to mine, its smell masks the tallow's.  I add the tea tree oil for its anti-bacterial, anti-fungal, etc. properties.  You could probably add another essential oil to give it a more pleasant scent.



I have a friend who butchers her own cows every year. They save all the fat and make a ton of candles in jars. She has said that they are only for emergencies/end of the world. LOL  :ack:
 
The following users thanked this post: Jayne, MundaCorMeum

Offline MundaCorMeum

  • Mary Garden
  • Feldwebel
  • ***
  • Posts: 4594
  • Thanked: 4531 times
  • Religion: Catholic
Re: What are you working on?
« Reply #51 on: May 01, 2020, 04:27:10 PM »
We don't butcher out own animals, but I could certainly talk to our butcher and see about getting the leaf fat.

We raise pigs, too.  I always save the bacon fat (lard?) after cooking, and keep jars of it in the fridge for cooking.  I make my gumbo rouxs with nothing but bacon fat; it's pretty delicious.
 
The following users thanked this post: Jayne, Lynne, queen.saints

Offline queen.saints

  • Mary Garden
  • Wachtmeister
  • ***
  • Posts: 765
  • Thanked: 497 times
  • Religion: Catholic
Re: What are you working on?
« Reply #52 on: May 02, 2020, 05:18:21 AM »
Which recipe do you use? We have enough beef tallow to last several lifetimes, but organic moisturizer is expensive.
 

Offline Jayne

  • Mary Garden
  • Major
  • ****
  • Posts: 13162
  • Thanked: 5367 times
  • Comic Sans FrontiŤres
  • Religion: Roman Catholic
Re: What are you working on?
« Reply #53 on: May 02, 2020, 01:04:51 PM »
Which recipe do you use? We have enough beef tallow to last several lifetimes, but organic moisturizer is expensive.

I don't follow a recipe although what I do is similar to the link I gave for the wet rendering method.  If you already have beef tallow you can just use it as is for a moisturizer.  If you want to add a bit of essential oil, melt the tallow, add the oil, and recool.
Jesus, meek and humble of heart, make my heart like unto Thine.
 
The following users thanked this post: maryslittlegarden, queen.saints

Offline MundaCorMeum

  • Mary Garden
  • Feldwebel
  • ***
  • Posts: 4594
  • Thanked: 4531 times
  • Religion: Catholic
Re: What are you working on?
« Reply #54 on: May 03, 2020, 11:05:31 AM »
Update:

I've made enough successful loaves of sourdough sandwich breads to feel confident in my recipe now.  Here's my (adapted from the original I posted) recipe:

THE NIGHT BEFORE:
Build your levain.
1 cup active starter
2 cups water
2 cups bread flour

Mix ingredients with a whisk until all flour is well incorporated.  Cover and let sit overnight. 

IN THE MORNING
mix final dough:
(Makes 2 small loaves; I double this recipe for my family, and it lasts us a week)

750 g flour
323 g milk*
16 g salt
65 g unsalted butter at room* temperature
31 g honey
411 g mature 100%-hydration sourdough starter

*In a Pyrex, I combine the milk and butter and warm it in the microwave for a minute or two, then add it too the rest of the ingredients in a large mixing bowl, after giving it a stir to make sure it isn't too hot).

After all ingredients are combined in a large mixing bowl, stir with a wooden spoon or by hand, untill everything is just incorporated...no need to develop gluten yet.  Let it rest in the bowl, covered, or about 30 minutes, then knead by hand until dough is nice and smooth.  Place dough in a lightly oiled bowl, cover, and then continue with the recipe as it is originally written on the blog post. 

That's my method.  I'll post pics later today, as I have some rising right now :)

EDIT: at the end when I divide the dough, I weigh the final dough and divide evenly into four pieces....I don't worry if they are exactly 800 g like she says in the recipe.  It has been pretty close so far, though.
« Last Edit: May 03, 2020, 11:10:20 AM by MundaCorMeum »
 
The following users thanked this post: maryslittlegarden, Jayne, Lynne

Offline MundaCorMeum

  • Mary Garden
  • Feldwebel
  • ***
  • Posts: 4594
  • Thanked: 4531 times
  • Religion: Catholic
Re: What are you working on?
« Reply #55 on: May 03, 2020, 04:25:15 PM »
I need more shaping practice, but they sure will taste good!
 
The following users thanked this post: maryslittlegarden, queen.saints

Offline MundaCorMeum

  • Mary Garden
  • Feldwebel
  • ***
  • Posts: 4594
  • Thanked: 4531 times
  • Religion: Catholic
Re: What are you working on?
« Reply #56 on: May 06, 2020, 09:51:16 PM »
Alright...I've been researching via YouTube videos (thank you for the suggestion, Padraig!).  I'm ready to try croissants again....just as soon as butter goes on sale
 
The following users thanked this post: maryslittlegarden, Lynne, Padraig

Offline Bernadette

  • Mary Garden
  • Hauptmann
  • ****
  • Posts: 9507
  • Thanked: 4974 times
  • Religion: Roman Catholic
Re: What are you working on?
« Reply #57 on: May 21, 2020, 03:39:22 PM »
My sewing machine FINALLY came, and I was able to sew the duvet cover. I love this new machine! It goes like greased lightening! Iíve never used a brand new sewing machine before, and itís a great experience.
"Make merry, and be glad: for this thy brother was dead, and is come to life again; he was lost, and is found."
 
The following users thanked this post: maryslittlegarden, Jayne, Lynne, MundaCorMeum, queen.saints, coffeeandcigarette

Offline Bernadette

  • Mary Garden
  • Hauptmann
  • ****
  • Posts: 9507
  • Thanked: 4974 times
  • Religion: Roman Catholic
Re: What are you working on?
« Reply #58 on: May 28, 2020, 02:48:25 PM »
I just finished sewing the binding on my postcard quilt. Iím torn between keeping it and selling it. Iíd forgotten how pretty it is. :)



Edit: Iíve posted it on EBay. Hereís hoping it finds a good home. :)
« Last Edit: May 28, 2020, 04:36:00 PM by Bernadette »
"Make merry, and be glad: for this thy brother was dead, and is come to life again; he was lost, and is found."
 
The following users thanked this post: maryslittlegarden, Jayne

Offline Maximilian

  • Hauptmann
  • ****
  • Posts: 5416
  • Thanked: 3383 times
Re: What are you working on?
« Reply #59 on: May 28, 2020, 03:29:04 PM »
I just finished sewing the binding on my postcard quilt. Iím torn between keeping it and selling it. Iíd forgotten how pretty it is. :)



That's beautiful.
 
The following users thanked this post: Bernadette