Author Topic: Tempus Adventus  (Read 314 times)

Offline Vetus Ordo

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Tempus Adventus
« on: December 01, 2019, 03:57:21 PM »
First Sunday of Advent.

Introitus: Ad Te Levavi Psalm 25 (24): 1-3


Ad te levavi animam meam,
Deus meus, in te confido, non erubescam.
Neque irrideant me inimici mei.
Et enim universi qui te expectant non confundentur.


Unto thee, O LORD, do I lift up my soul,
My God, I trust in thee: let me not be ashamed.
Let not mine enemies triumph over me.
Yea, let none that wait on thee be ashamed.
DISPOSE OUR DAYS IN THY PEACE, AND COMMAND US TO BE DELIVERED FROM ETERNAL DAMNATION, AND TO BE NUMBERED IN THE FLOCK OF THINE ELECT.
 
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Offline Vetus Ordo

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Re: Tempus Adventus
« Reply #1 on: December 08, 2019, 03:58:44 PM »
Second Sunday of Advent.

Introitus: Populus Sion


(Is. 30) Populus Sion, ecce Dominus veniet ad salvandas gentes:
et auditam faciet Dominus gloriam vocis suae in laetitia cordis vestri.
(Ps.79:2a) Qui regis Israel, intende: qui deducis, velut ovem, Ioseph.

(Is. 30) People of Sion, behold the Lord shall come to save the nations:
and the Lord shall make the glory of his voice to be heard in the joy of your heart.
(Ps.80:1a ) Give ear, O thou that rulest Israel: thou that leadest Joseph like a sheep.
DISPOSE OUR DAYS IN THY PEACE, AND COMMAND US TO BE DELIVERED FROM ETERNAL DAMNATION, AND TO BE NUMBERED IN THE FLOCK OF THINE ELECT.
 
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Offline Vetus Ordo

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Re: Tempus Adventus
« Reply #2 on: December 15, 2019, 03:46:34 PM »
Third Sunday of Advent, also known as Gaudete Sunday.

Introitus: Gaudete in Domino


Gaudete in Domino semper: iterum dico, gaudete. Modestia vestra nota sit omnibus hominibus: Dominus enim prope est. Nihil solliciti sitis: sed in omni oratione et obsecratione cum gratiarum actione petitiones vestræ innotescant apud Deum. Benedixisti Domine terram tuam: avertisti captivitatem Jacob.

Rejoice in the Lord always; again I say, rejoice. Let your forbearance be known to all, for the Lord is near at hand; have no anxiety about anything, but in all things, by prayer and supplication, with thanksgiving, let your requests be known to God. Lord, you have blessed your land; you have turned away the captivity of Jacob.
DISPOSE OUR DAYS IN THY PEACE, AND COMMAND US TO BE DELIVERED FROM ETERNAL DAMNATION, AND TO BE NUMBERED IN THE FLOCK OF THINE ELECT.
 
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Offline Vetus Ordo

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Re: Tempus Adventus
« Reply #3 on: December 22, 2019, 11:37:33 AM »
Fourth Sunday of Advent.

Introitus: Rorate coeli


Quote from: Catholic Encyclopedia
(Vulgate, text), the opening words of Isaiah 45:8. The text is used frequently both at Mass and in the Divine Office during Advent, as it gives exquisite poetical expression to the longings of Patriarchs and Prophets, and symbolically of the Church, for the coming of the Messias. Throughout Advent it occurs daily as the versicle and response at Vespers. For this purpose the verse is divided into the versicle, "Rorate coeli desuper et nubes pluant justum" (Drop down dew, ye heavens, from above, and let the clouds rain the just), and the response: "Aperiatur terra et germinet salvatorem" (Let the earth be opened and send forth a Saviour"). The text is also used: (a) as the Introit for the Fourth Sunday in Advent, for Wednesday in Ember Week, for the feast of the Expectation of the Blessed Virgin, and for votive Masses of the Blessed Virgin during Advent; (b) as a versicle in the first responsory of Tuesday in the first week of Advent; (c) as the first antiphon at Lauds for the Tuesday preceding Christmas and the second antiphon at Matins of the Expectation of the Blessed Virgin; (d) in the second responsory for Friday of the third week of Advent and in the fifth responsory in Matins of the Expectation of the Blessed Virgin. In the "Book of Hymns" (Edinburgh, 1910), p. 4, W. Rooke-Ley translates the text in connection with the O Antiphons:


Mystic dew from heaven
Unto earth is given:
Break, O earth, a Saviour yield —
Fairest flower of the field".

The exquisite Introit plain-song may be found in in the various editions of the Vatican Graduale and the Solesmes "Liber Usualis", 1908, p. 125. Under the heading, "Prayer of the Churches of France during Advent", Dom Guéranger (Liturgical Year, Advent tr., Dublin, 1870, pp. 155-6) gives it as an antiphon to each of a series of prayers ("Ne irascaris", "Peccavimus", "Vide Domine", "Consolamini") expressive of penitence, expectation, comfort, and furnishes the Latin text and an English rendering of the Prayer. The Latin text and a different English rendering are also given in the Baltimore "Manual of Prayers" (pp. 603-4). A plain-song setting of the "Prayer", or series of prayers, is given in the Solesmes "Manual of Gregorian Chant" (Rome-Tournai, 1903, 313-5) in plain-song notation, and in a slightly simpler form in modern notation in the "Roman Hymnal" (New York, 1884, pp. 140-3), as also in "Les principaux chants liturgiques" (Paris, 1875, pp. 111-2) and 'IRecueil d'anciens et de nouveaux cantiques notés" (Paris, 1886, pp. 218-9).
DISPOSE OUR DAYS IN THY PEACE, AND COMMAND US TO BE DELIVERED FROM ETERNAL DAMNATION, AND TO BE NUMBERED IN THE FLOCK OF THINE ELECT.
 
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