Author Topic: Explanation of Byzantine Liturgy (Done by Russian Orthodox Church)  (Read 820 times)

Offline TheReturnofLive

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Offline TheReturnofLive

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Re: Explanation of Byzantine Liturgy (Done by Russian Orthodox Church)
« Reply #1 on: October 19, 2019, 11:32:20 AM »
Here's the same Liturgy performed at the Pontifical Russian College for Good Friday.

 

Offline Prayerful

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Re: Explanation of Byzantine Liturgy (Done by Russian Orthodox Church)
« Reply #2 on: October 19, 2019, 01:33:21 PM »
The dignity of the Greek Rite ceremonial makes what Consilium, drawing on the Pact of the Catacombs, and others radical versions of V2, was trying to do. The New Mass and the aesthetic of the mid sixties are inseparable, and belong to history. Hopefully those old beasts will cease roaring soon. The Byzantine Catholics seem to have chairs in the main body of whichever oratory or chapel they are using, where the last EO church I was inside had a bench and some chairs against the wall for the old, but that's just a detail. It is also unfortunate that the rood screen or jubé largely disappeared in the West in roughly the eighteenth century. The onion peeling that led to the New Mass came ultimately from this logic which saw those screens removed in most places.

One detail is that the English seems a standard, if formal, vernacular, not a sort of hieratic English which might be seen in an Ordinariate Mass or the English readings after the Gospel being sung at a High Mass. I think the Russians use a more old fashioned form of Russian in the EO liturgy, a newer version of Old Church Slavonic, or maybe I'm wrong.
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Offline TheReturnofLive

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Re: Explanation of Byzantine Liturgy (Done by Russian Orthodox Church)
« Reply #3 on: October 19, 2019, 02:24:03 PM »
One detail is that the English seems a standard, if formal, vernacular, not a sort of hieratic English which might be seen in an Ordinariate Mass or the English readings after the Gospel being sung at a High Mass. I think the Russians use a more old fashioned form of Russian in the EO liturgy, a newer version of Old Church Slavonic, or maybe I'm wrong.

While Slavonic is the liturgical language of the Russian Orthodox Church, and is the one used in Russia (even today), in non-Russian speaking countries, there is greater leniency of using the vernacular. The chant of the first video is close to the standard for parishes that use English (even though there are parishes in the US and Western Europe which mainly use Slavonic with exception of the Homily and Bible Readings), and it's based on Slavonic Chant. A lot of these compositions are produced by OCA Orthodox seminaries, like St. Vladimir's or St. Tikhon's.


And I know the few Russian Greek Catholic Churches which use English use these compositions.


« Last Edit: October 19, 2019, 02:30:14 PM by TheReturnofLive »
 
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Offline aquinas138

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Re: Explanation of Byzantine Liturgy (Done by Russian Orthodox Church)
« Reply #4 on: December 05, 2019, 09:58:55 PM »
The Byzantine Catholics seem to have chairs in the main body of whichever oratory or chapel they are using, where the last EO church I was inside had a bench and some chairs against the wall for the old, but that's just a detail.

In the US at least, it seems those parishes affiliated with the Ecumenical Patriarchate (Greek Orthodox, Carpatho-Russians, etc.) and the Antiochians seem more likely to have chairs and even pews. The more Slavic a parish, the less likely that is. The OCA and ROCOR parishes near me have benches along the walls. There is a parish of the Moscow Patriarchate not too far from here; I highly doubt they have pews.

[/quote]One detail is that the English seems a standard, if formal, vernacular, not a sort of hieratic English which might be seen in an Ordinariate Mass or the English readings after the Gospel being sung at a High Mass. I think the Russians use a more old fashioned form of Russian in the EO liturgy, a newer version of Old Church Slavonic, or maybe I'm wrong.[/quote]

There is a lot of variation in this. The Greek Orthodox and the ACROD (Carpatho-Russians) use modern English, though calling it "vernacular" isn't exactly accurate. The ROCOR and Antiochians and the various Old Calendarists use hieratic English; in the OCA, there is a lot of variation from parish to parish. The one near me uses hieratic English.
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Offline christulsa

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Re: Explanation of Byzantine Liturgy (Done by Russian Orthodox Church)
« Reply #5 on: December 09, 2019, 10:18:22 PM »
I used to attend the Byzantine Liturgy in Tulsa for about a year before I went Tridentine rite.    A most beautiful liturgy, though I realized I needed the spirituality of the Latin rite.  My favorite part is when the priest turns and approaches the faithful before the Institutition singing solemnly "the doors, the doors, wisdom be attentive!" as if to remind us of the Divine Mystery about to take place on the Altar.
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Offline aquinas138

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Re: Explanation of Byzantine Liturgy (Done by Russian Orthodox Church)
« Reply #6 on: December 10, 2019, 10:23:43 AM »
I used to attend the Byzantine Liturgy in Tulsa for about a year before I went Tridentine rite.    A most beautiful liturgy, though I realized I needed the spirituality of the Latin rite.  My favorite part is when the priest turns and approaches the faithful before the Institutition singing solemnly "the doors, the doors, wisdom be attentive!" as if to remind us of the Divine Mystery about to take place on the Altar.

Yes, I find particularly interesting the pronounced distinction between the roles of the priest and the deacon: the deacon leads the people in the litanies, while the priest attends to the altar, turning to impart the blessing, but generally being preoccupied with the altar. It is also striking during Vespers/Vigil with a deacon and a choir in the Russian tradition; the priest is behind the iconostas much of the time reciting priestly prayers, with the deacon doing the litanies and censing the church and the choir singing.
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