Author Topic: The Legitimacy of Conspiracy Theories  (Read 1235 times)

Offline Michael Wilson

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Re: The Legitimacy of Conspiracy Theories
« Reply #75 on: February 10, 2019, 03:13:50 PM »
Gerard,
re. The accidental shooting of Kennedy: I watched a video on this by a ballistic expert and he did a thorough job on the "magic bullet"; he actually was able to demonstrate that the magic bullet was real, because of the seating position of the Lincoln Continental jumper seats; Gov. Connelly and his wife were actually sitting below Jfk and Jackie and slightly more towards the center of the car. The fatal shot in the Zapruder film can be seen to exit from the right side and upward of J.F.K.'s head; which is impossible, considering the position of Oswald (above and to the right). The bullet should have exited to the left and below as the initial trajectory of the first (actually second) bullet did.
He also lined up the entrance hole with the exit hole and moving back in the opposite direction, he concluded that the only place that the shot could have come from was from the automobile with Secret service men following J.F.K's car.
The third thing is that the entrance hole in the second shot going into JFK's skull is smaller that the 6.5 round of Oswald's Carcano's rifle.
Interesting. 
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Offline Heinrich

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Re: The Legitimacy of Conspiracy Theories
« Reply #76 on: February 10, 2019, 04:10:42 PM »
Pray for the Consecration.                           
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Offline Gerard

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Re: The Legitimacy of Conspiracy Theories
« Reply #77 on: February 10, 2019, 08:21:24 PM »
Gerard,
re. The accidental shooting of Kennedy: I watched a video on this by a ballistic expert and he did a thorough job on the "magic bullet"; he actually was able to demonstrate that the magic bullet was real, because of the seating position of the Lincoln Continental jumper seats; Gov. Connelly and his wife were actually sitting below Jfk and Jackie and slightly more towards the center of the car. The fatal shot in the Zapruder film can be seen to exit from the right side and upward of J.F.K.'s head; which is impossible, considering the position of Oswald (above and to the right). The bullet should have exited to the left and below as the initial trajectory of the first (actually second) bullet did.
He also lined up the entrance hole with the exit hole and moving back in the opposite direction, he concluded that the only place that the shot could have come from was from the automobile with Secret service men following J.F.K's car.
The third thing is that the entrance hole in the second shot going into JFK's skull is smaller that the 6.5 round of Oswald's Carcano's rifle.
Interesting.


If it's the same person I'm thinking of.  He was a ballistics expert that was brought on by one of the major news networks originally to prove that the shots could be fired from the Book Depository and after a few tries he did eventually complete the shots in a re-enactment.  But he later thought that with the difficulty he had shooting, warmed up and not in an adrenaline rush, coupled with his superior competency to Oswald, that there must be more to it. 

His conclusion was probably the least sexy of all the "conspiracy theories" but it has an air of credibility that connects all of the dots with the anomalies surrounding the case.  I just looked it up.  His book is called Moral Error by Bonar Menninger. 

 
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Offline TradGranny

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Re: The Legitimacy of Conspiracy Theories
« Reply #78 on: February 12, 2019, 05:57:35 PM »

No one contests that minor alterations to astronomical photos are made,
[/quote]

Then why are no "original" photos available?
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Offline Gerard

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Re: The Legitimacy of Conspiracy Theories
« Reply #79 on: February 13, 2019, 12:10:45 PM »

No one contests that minor alterations to astronomical photos are made,

Then why are no "original" photos available?
[/quote]

So far, my favorite "moon hoax" videos that I've seen are the lectures by photographer Marcus Allen and a video produced by a guy going by the name of Jet Wintzer. 

And the various videos of the astronauts in the international space station are really interesting.  The mousse in the women's hair, the wire work to show the tricks in zero gravity, the green screen fails and the accidental video of President Bush being wheeled through Nasa with the screen in the background showing an identifiable astronaut in front of a special effects screen. 

It's actually pretty compelling, I'd love to see a good rebuttal to a lot of them. 

I saw Joe Rogan on youtube talking about it, and he's walked back his position to be more objective in that he says he doesn't know the facts but a lot of stuff released to the public has a fishy character to it and the whole topic is really full of juicy material compared to many other topics. 

 

Offline TradGranny

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Re: The Legitimacy of Conspiracy Theories
« Reply #80 on: February 13, 2019, 08:39:52 PM »

No one contests that minor alterations to astronomical photos are made,

Then why are no "original" photos available?

So far, my favorite "moon hoax" videos that I've seen are the lectures by photographer Marcus Allen and a video produced by a guy going by the name of Jet Wintzer. 

And the various videos of the astronauts in the international space station are really interesting.  The mousse in the women's hair, the wire work to show the tricks in zero gravity, the green screen fails and the accidental video of President Bush being wheeled through Nasa with the screen in the background showing an identifiable astronaut in front of a special effects screen. 

It's actually pretty compelling, I'd love to see a good rebuttal to a lot of them. 

I saw Joe Rogan on youtube talking about it, and he's walked back his position to be more objective in that he says he doesn't know the facts but a lot of stuff released to the public has a fishy character to it and the whole topic is really full of juicy material compared to many other topics.
[/quote]

I too have seen videos of the ISS that are so over-the-top ridiculous that it seems possible that they are "gaslighting" us. Remember the old movie "Gaslight"? The murderer married the woman who, as a child, had witnessed him committing the murder and she had repressed the memory. HIs goal was to drive her crazy in order to discredit her. He would dim the gas lighting in the home (1800s) and when she remarked about it, he'd say "Darling, you are imagining things again." He would steal and replace items to make her think she was losing her mind, etc. etc.

I once read a new item about "debris the size of Texas" (from Fukashima) floating in the Pacific Ocean, which the news called a discredited internet rumor. Out of curiosity, I went to the page of the agency quoted in the article, something like NOAA National Oceanogrpahic and Atmosphere Admin, and on their OPENING PAGE was a photo with the words "Debris the size of Texas floating in the Pacific Ocean." What? This causes cognitive dissonance and is a major form of gaslighting.

Sort of like when Obama released his doctored-up absolute phony looking birth certificate.
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Offline Gerard

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Re: The Legitimacy of Conspiracy Theories
« Reply #81 on: February 14, 2019, 12:55:34 AM »


I too have seen videos of the ISS that are so over-the-top ridiculous that it seems possible that they are "gaslighting" us. Remember the old movie "Gaslight"? The murderer married the woman who, as a child, had witnessed him committing the murder and she had repressed the memory. HIs goal was to drive her crazy in order to discredit her. He would dim the gas lighting in the home (1800s) and when she remarked about it, he'd say "Darling, you are imagining things again." He would steal and replace items to make her think she was losing her mind, etc. etc.

I once read a new item about "debris the size of Texas" (from Fukashima) floating in the Pacific Ocean, which the news called a discredited internet rumor. Out of curiosity, I went to the page of the agency quoted in the article, something like NOAA National Oceanogrpahic and Atmosphere Admin, and on their OPENING PAGE was a photo with the words "Debris the size of Texas floating in the Pacific Ocean." What? This causes cognitive dissonance and is a major form of gaslighting.

Sort of like when Obama released his doctored-up absolute phony looking birth certificate.

First off, I think they are almost always entertaining to watch.  I think there are varying degrees of bias at work in the different presentations.  Aliens and Bigfoot are usually some of the shows that make the biggest stretches of truth.   With that said, there is some official info that stretches credibility and would be very, very hard to gaslight.  The interviews of astronaut Don Petitt where he states we don't go back to the moon because we "lost the technology" and it's very, very hard to rebuild that technology.  I find that very hard to believe. 


 

Offline TradGranny

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Re: The Legitimacy of Conspiracy Theories
« Reply #82 on: February 14, 2019, 03:56:50 PM »


I too have seen videos of the ISS that are so over-the-top ridiculous that it seems possible that they are "gaslighting" us. Remember the old movie "Gaslight"? The murderer married the woman who, as a child, had witnessed him committing the murder and she had repressed the memory. HIs goal was to drive her crazy in order to discredit her. He would dim the gas lighting in the home (1800s) and when she remarked about it, he'd say "Darling, you are imagining things again." He would steal and replace items to make her think she was losing her mind, etc. etc.

I once read a new item about "debris the size of Texas" (from Fukashima) floating in the Pacific Ocean, which the news called a discredited internet rumor. Out of curiosity, I went to the page of the agency quoted in the article, something like NOAA National Oceanogrpahic and Atmosphere Admin, and on their OPENING PAGE was a photo with the words "Debris the size of Texas floating in the Pacific Ocean." What? This causes cognitive dissonance and is a major form of gaslighting.

Sort of like when Obama released his doctored-up absolute phony looking birth certificate.

First off, I think they are almost always entertaining to watch.  I think there are varying degrees of bias at work in the different presentations.  Aliens and Bigfoot are usually some of the shows that make the biggest stretches of truth.   With that said, there is some official info that stretches credibility and would be very, very hard to gaslight.  The interviews of astronaut Don Petitt where he states we don't go back to the moon because we "lost the technology" and it's very, very hard to rebuild that technology.  I find that very hard to believe.

Not only did they lose the technology, they also lost the original film of the "moon landing."
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Offline TradGranny

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Re: The Legitimacy of Conspiracy Theories
« Reply #83 on: February 14, 2019, 03:59:16 PM »
To fully understand moon landing hoax requires looking into the NASA-Freemasonic link.

http://freemasoninformation.com/masonic-education/famous/masonic-astronauts/
To have courage for whatever comes in life - everything lies in that.
Saint Teresa of Avila