Author Topic: Funny German Words  (Read 1776 times)

Offline red solo cup

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Re: Funny German Words
« Reply #15 on: April 09, 2020, 05:50:24 AM »
"It's so lonely 'round the fields of Athenry"
 
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Offline Jayne

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Re: Funny German Words
« Reply #16 on: May 07, 2020, 04:53:54 PM »
My German word of the day today was  "der Spitzbart."

That is a beard like this:
Jesus, meek and humble of heart, make my heart like unto Thine.
 

Offline Machaut1377

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Re: Funny German Words
« Reply #17 on: May 08, 2020, 05:20:29 PM »
der Scheibenkleister.
 

Offline Heinrich

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Re: Funny German Words
« Reply #18 on: May 08, 2020, 05:45:57 PM »
der Scheibenkleister.

Does that mean wall paper paster? I had never heard of this compound.
Schaff Recht mir Gott und führe meine Sache gegen ein unheiliges Volk . . .   .                          
Lex Orandi, lex credendi, lex vivendi.
"Die Welt sucht nach Ehre, Ansehen, Reichtum, Vergnügen; die Heiligen aber suchen Demütigung, Verachtung, Armut, Abtötung und Buße." --Ausschnitt von der Geschichte des Lebens St. Bennos.
 

Offline Fleur-de-Lys

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Re: Funny German Words
« Reply #19 on: May 08, 2020, 06:14:43 PM »
der Scheibenkleister.

Does that mean wall paper paster? I had never heard of this compound.

It is a minced oath used to replace the vulgar word that begins with the same five letters.
 
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Offline Machaut1377

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Re: Funny German Words
« Reply #20 on: May 08, 2020, 06:18:20 PM »
der Scheibenkleister.

Does that mean wall paper paster? I had never heard of this compound.

Here is the context in which I found the word

Da stolperte er über seinen Hund und stieß den Sarg von der Tafel herunter! Schneewittchen rollte aus dem Sarg heraus und auf das Gras.
„Oh nein! Oh verflixt! So ein Scheibenkleister!”, rief der Prinz. From a retelling of the Snow White fairy-tale from the FableCottage https://www.thefablecottage.com/german/schneewittchen

The dual-language dictionary site Dict.leo.org says it a dated euphemesism for scheiße. 

Duden.de gives its meaning as being the second meaning of scheiße, which they give as  etwas sehr Schlechtes, Unerfreuliches, Ärgerliches.
Link to the Duden.de entry https://www.duden.de/rechtschreibung/Scheibenkleister

It seems to be a polite kid-friendly way of saying oh shit.
 

Offline Machaut1377

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Re: Funny German Words
« Reply #21 on: May 08, 2020, 06:19:34 PM »
der Scheibenkleister.

Does that mean wall paper paster? I had never heard of this compound.

It is a minced oath used to replace the vulgar word that begins with the same five letters.

Pretty much this.
 

Offline drummerboy

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Re: Funny German Words
« Reply #22 on: September 29, 2020, 02:12:52 AM »
Zuckerkrank  - diabetic, literally sugar-sick

The terms der Diabetiker and diabetisch  also exist, but the native Germanic compounds are always more fun than the Latinate equivalents.

There is a specific term for these actually, it is kenning
The bee is small among flying things, but her fruit hath the chiefest sweetness - Ecclesiasticus 3:11
 

Offline Greg

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Re: Funny German Words
« Reply #23 on: September 29, 2020, 05:19:06 AM »
untermenschen - That word is hilarious.

« Last Edit: September 29, 2020, 05:24:27 AM by Greg »
 

Offline Heinrich

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Re: Funny German Words
« Reply #24 on: September 29, 2020, 11:54:38 AM »
Zuckerkrank  - diabetic, literally sugar-sick

The terms der Diabetiker and diabetisch  also exist, but the native Germanic compounds are always more fun than the Latinate equivalents.

There is a specific term for these actually, it is kenning

I am going to have to dust of the history of the German language notes. I have never heard of this German word and that many at all with the -ing suffix. "Ken" is an old Germanic(English) word(verb) that means to be familiar with. Of which comes the familiar German verb "kennen." But "Kenning"? Never heard of it. To this topic, I believe in an old epic the word Durstleidender is also metaphoric for diabetic. "Thirst sufferer."
Schaff Recht mir Gott und führe meine Sache gegen ein unheiliges Volk . . .   .                          
Lex Orandi, lex credendi, lex vivendi.
"Die Welt sucht nach Ehre, Ansehen, Reichtum, Vergnügen; die Heiligen aber suchen Demütigung, Verachtung, Armut, Abtötung und Buße." --Ausschnitt von der Geschichte des Lebens St. Bennos.
 

Offline Fleur-de-Lys

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Re: Funny German Words
« Reply #25 on: September 29, 2020, 12:55:43 PM »
Zuckerkrank  - diabetic, literally sugar-sick

The terms der Diabetiker and diabetisch  also exist, but the native Germanic compounds are always more fun than the Latinate equivalents.

There is a specific term for these actually, it is kenning

I am going to have to dust of the history of the German language notes. I have never heard of this German word and that many at all with the -ing suffix. "Ken" is an old Germanic(English) word(verb) that means to be familiar with. Of which comes the familiar German verb "kennen." But "Kenning"? Never heard of it. To this topic, I believe in an old epic the word Durstleidender is also metaphoric for diabetic. "Thirst sufferer."

I've never heard the term kenning used in this way. To my knowledge, a kenning is a poetic device associated with Old Norse and Old English poetry. It's a compound word coined by the poet and used metaphorically. What I was referring to is the fact that in German there are often native German compound words that are in common use alongside Latinate equivalents.

From Wikipedia:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kenning#Modern_usage
 
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Offline Heinrich

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Re: Funny German Words
« Reply #26 on: September 29, 2020, 06:44:01 PM »
Zuckerkrank  - diabetic, literally sugar-sick

The terms der Diabetiker and diabetisch  also exist, but the native Germanic compounds are always more fun than the Latinate equivalents.

There is a specific term for these actually, it is kenning

I am going to have to dust of the history of the German language notes. I have never heard of this German word and that many at all with the -ing suffix. "Ken" is an old Germanic(English) word(verb) that means to be familiar with. Of which comes the familiar German verb "kennen." But "Kenning"? Never heard of it. To this topic, I believe in an old epic the word Durstleidender is also metaphoric for diabetic. "Thirst sufferer."

I've never heard the term kenning used in this way. To my knowledge, a kenning is a poetic device associated with Old Norse and Old English poetry. It's a compound word coined by the poet and used metaphorically. What I was referring to is the fact that in German there are often native German compound words that are in common use alongside Latinate equivalents.

From Wikipedia:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kenning#Modern_usage

Now that I read a little more closely I see that. Yes. Kenning. Duh, H.

Lucas and Spielberg's writers used one here(first seven seconds):

Schaff Recht mir Gott und führe meine Sache gegen ein unheiliges Volk . . .   .                          
Lex Orandi, lex credendi, lex vivendi.
"Die Welt sucht nach Ehre, Ansehen, Reichtum, Vergnügen; die Heiligen aber suchen Demütigung, Verachtung, Armut, Abtötung und Buße." --Ausschnitt von der Geschichte des Lebens St. Bennos.
 
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Offline Fleur-de-Lys

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Re: Funny German Words
« Reply #27 on: September 29, 2020, 07:09:04 PM »
The Wikipedia article gives a nice example of a kenning in Modern German: Stubentiger - "parlour-tiger"  for cat:D
 
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Offline Vetus Ordo

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Re: Funny German Words
« Reply #28 on: September 29, 2020, 08:27:16 PM »
The Wikipedia article gives a nice example of a kenning in Modern German: Stubentiger - "parlour-tiger" for cat:D

That has to be one of the best descriptions I've seen for cats so far.

German has some redemptive traits here and there.
DISPOSE OUR DAYS IN THY PEACE, AND COMMAND US TO BE DELIVERED FROM ETERNAL DAMNATION, AND TO BE NUMBERED IN THE FLOCK OF THINE ELECT.
 
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Offline The Theosist

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Re: Funny German Words
« Reply #29 on: September 30, 2020, 11:19:06 AM »
Krankenwagen   - ambulance, literally, sick-wagon

Krankenschwester   - nurse, literally, sick-sister
Quote

In case anyone misunderstand, it's the genitive, as in of the sick.