Author Topic: 1955 revisions and the Liturgical Movement books  (Read 342 times)

Offline martin88nyc

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1955 revisions and the Liturgical Movement books
« on: December 25, 2018, 03:05:52 PM »
After listening to Fr. Cekada's critique of the 1955 Holy week revisions in the series on the Work of Human Hands I really would like to delve deeper into this topic. I know of a couple of books about liturgical revisions and changes but usually they focus on Novus Ordo and . Are there any scholarly, well researched books on this topic?
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Offline Prayerful

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Re: 1955 revisions and the Liturgical Movement books
« Reply #1 on: December 25, 2018, 07:42:02 PM »
Dr Lauren Pistras wrote Collects of the Roman Missalwhich compared the TLM and NOM propers throughout the year. Shows in a concrete way how defective the then newly concatenated or concocted NOM propers were.
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Offline martin88nyc

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Re: 1955 revisions and the Liturgical Movement books
« Reply #2 on: December 25, 2018, 08:16:09 PM »
Dr Lauren Pistras wrote Collects of the Roman Missalwhich compared the TLM and NOM propers throughout the year. Shows in a concrete way how defective the then newly concatenated or concocted NOM propers were.
I know. I meant years 1948-1955
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Offline Kaesekopf

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Re: 1955 revisions and the Liturgical Movement books
« Reply #3 on: December 25, 2018, 11:19:40 PM »
New Liturgical Movement blog has a long series of posts showing the changes.
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Offline moneil

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Offline Maximilian

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Re: 1955 revisions and the Liturgical Movement books
« Reply #5 on: December 26, 2018, 12:11:06 PM »
Carol Byrne has written a series of articles detailing the New Liturgical Movement which now runs to about 70 installments over at Tradition in Action.

Here are some prior discussions of the topic at SD:

https://www.suscipedomine.com/forum/index.php?topic=18940.0

http://www.suscipedomine.com/forum/index.php?topic=11490.0

Here is an article on the Holy Week revisions of 1955, with links at the bottom to prior articles in the series:

https://www.traditioninaction.org/HotTopics/f124_Dialogue_43.htm

The Holy Week Reform Paved the Way for the Reform of the Mass
Dr. Carol Byrne, Great Britain

In this article we will look at the manner in which ancient principles of the traditional Holy Week liturgy were sacrificed on the altar of Progressivism, and reflect on the tragic fact that Pius XII made this destructive agenda the basis of binding juridical norms for the whole Roman Rite.

Night of the long knives

This was accomplished on November 16, 1955, with the Decree Maxima Redemptionis.
 
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Offline Josephine87

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Re: 1955 revisions and the Liturgical Movement books
« Reply #6 on: December 28, 2018, 12:23:03 AM »
More like St. Pius X's Divino Afflatu and major liturgical changes by papal fiat paved the way for Vatican 2.
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Offline martin88nyc

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Re: 1955 revisions and the Liturgical Movement books
« Reply #7 on: December 28, 2018, 12:29:32 AM »
Where did the "reformers" get their ideas. I know some were pure inventions and creations but they must have had a source from which all of their ideas have flown.
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Offline Sempronius

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Re: 1955 revisions and the Liturgical Movement books
« Reply #8 on: December 28, 2018, 01:05:01 AM »
Where did the "reformers" get their ideas. I know some were pure inventions and creations but they must have had a source from which all of their ideas have flown.

I consider Erasmus and Cardinal Newman to be the two greatest "fathers" of vatican 2.

And besides, technology rules the world. I like to read about 20th century inventions alongside the history of 20th century catholicism to get a fuller picture.
« Last Edit: December 28, 2018, 01:08:04 AM by Sempronius »
 

Offline Der Polka-König

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Re: 1955 revisions and the Liturgical Movement books
« Reply #9 on: December 28, 2018, 08:27:08 AM »
An excellent item-by-item treatment of Holy Week is given by Fr Stefano Carusi, IBP (translated into English by Fr Charles Johnson, a military chaplain who assisted at Holy Week in my parish a couple years ago).

A quick example from Fr Carusi's discussion on Palm Sunday:

Quote
4. (OHS 1956): Suppression of the preface which speaks of Christ's authority over the kingdoms and powers of this world. (25)

Commentary: It is astonishing to note that the intention to proclaim solemnly Christ's kingship (26) is carried out by suppressing the preface which describe His kingship. This preface is declared superfluous in no uncertain terms and therefore to be eliminated: "Considering the little coherence of these prefaces, their prolixity, and, in certain formulations, their poverty of thought, their loss was of little relevance." (27)

(MR 1952): The Roman rite often uses, for certain great liturgical moments, e.g. the consecration of the oils or priestly ordination, the singing of a preface, which is a particularly solemn way of calling upon God; likewise for the blessing of the palms a preface was prescribed which spoke of the divine order of creation and its subordination to God the Father, i.e. the subordination of the created order, which is admonished through kings and governments to be duly obedient to Christ: "Tibi enim serviunt creaturae tuae quia te solum auctorem et Deum cognoscunt et omnis factura tua te collaudat, et benedicunt te Sancti tui: quia illud magnum Unigeniti tui nomen coram regibus et potestatibus hujus saeculi libera voce confitentur" ["For thy creatures serve Thee, because they acknowledge Thee alone as their origin and God, and all thy work praises Thee together, and thy Saints bless Thee: for they confess with unfettered voice the great Name of thy Only-begotten before the kings and powers of this world"]. (28) In a few elegant lines, the text of this chant reveals the theological foundation of the duty of temporal governments to be subservient to Christ the King.

The whole (English-version) document is on Rorate: https://rorate-caeli.blogspot.com/2010/07/reform-of-holy-week-in-years-1951-1956.html
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Offline martin88nyc

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Re: 1955 revisions and the Liturgical Movement books
« Reply #10 on: December 28, 2018, 09:49:30 PM »
This is good stuff. Nicola Giampietro's book is worth buying.  I also found this gem:
 :)
https://www.pre1955holyweek.com/study-of-holy-weekk

https://docs.wixstatic.com/ugd/01715a_4851a9f8cce74701916cb34501b941cd.pdf

Here is a book that has one chapter dedicated to the Pian reform:

The Organic Development of the Liturgy: The Principles of Liturgical Reform and Their Relation to the Twentieth-Century Liturgical Movement Prior to the Second Vatican Council
https://www.amazon.com/dp/1586171062/?coliid=I1D1SS146X57QT&colid=8S9FI1AUWLQ&psc=0&ref_=lv_ov_lig_dp_it
« Last Edit: December 28, 2018, 09:55:42 PM by martin88nyc »
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Offline Prayerful

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Re: 1955 revisions and the Liturgical Movement books
« Reply #11 on: December 29, 2018, 12:01:30 PM »
Where did the "reformers" get their ideas. I know some were pure inventions and creations but they must have had a source from which all of their ideas have flown.

I consider Erasmus and Cardinal Newman to be the two greatest "fathers" of vatican 2.

And besides, technology rules the world. I like to read about 20th century inventions alongside the history of 20th century catholicism to get a fuller picture.

I would consider that unfair to Cardinal Newman. Development of doctrine is now crudely cited as a pretext for this or that error, rather than the further explanation and understanding of teaching, all the while retaining consistency, which Cdl Newman meant. His wariness towards some proposals for defining infallibility, and welcome for modest terms arrived at, was insightful. Imagine how the Argentine and his gay gang could have abused ultramontane definitions which strengthened Papal fiat. Moreover Newman became an Oratarian priest, an Order which always gave liturgy a dignity which it mostly lost after V2. Now, Desiderius Erasmus would likely have been condemned have he lived in a time when the Protestant Rebellion was renting apart Christendom, but I cannot be sure how he was an influence beyond the superficial, the way that the AL etc ghostwriter cites St Thomas Aquinas  in support of the grossest distortion.

I would see the immediate pre and postwar philosophical ferment, of which Nouvelle Théologie was a notably noxious product, as having the biggest influence. Sometimes as with Teihard de Chardin SJ hard science, social science, theology and philosophy all mingled together to produce some deeply weird material. The faith of millions was the casualty of this self-indulgence.
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Offline Sempronius

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Re: 1955 revisions and the Liturgical Movement books
« Reply #12 on: December 29, 2018, 01:26:12 PM »
I agree about Newman, but I mentioned his name because many liberals use his thoughts to shape their own new religion. For instance, Newman wrote in The development of doctrine, that the best and purest form of Christianity is devoid of all rituals and forms. Just like it was among the apostles, they didnt have set rules for mass etc.. and liberals feel inspired by that and want to create a formless religion where people ”come together and worship with one mind and soul in love of Christ”, no need for rosaries, sacramentals, kneeling and bowing and all that medieval superstition.

I admire them both, Erasmus was a close friend to Saint Thomas More, and I think they are so sublime and lofty that sophisticated liberals will use them and be admired among the bishops that ”run the show”.
 
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