Author Topic: History in Pictures  (Read 4171 times)

Offline Vetus Ordo

  • St. Joseph's Workbench
  • Feldwebel
  • ***
  • Posts: 2507
  • Thanked: 1992 times
  • Religion: The Way
Re: History in Pictures
« Reply #90 on: August 25, 2019, 09:30:10 PM »
The Deadly Slap







It was used when a soldier lost/dropped his weapon and was in close combat with the enemy. It could be done with both sides of the hand and it was able to stupefy, and even kill a recipient. It was also used to stop horses. The ‘slap’ technique was developed in time. Soldiers that made up the front lines, azab soldiers, used to train by slapping oiled marble hundreds of time every day, and as a result they had very strong hands and arms. The best “slappers” were usually the Başıbozuk soldiers, which were irregular military made of volunteering men. The word literally means irregular, but it also has a connotation like “mad”.

It says, the slap was placed upon any side of the face or on the neck, without bending the elbows or the wrists and using the strength of shoulders. It could also be aimed directly upon the face, placing the palm of the hand on the nose. Thus, the skull would break between the eye sockets and stab the brain, causing death. Even when the slap was placed upon the sides of the face, it could break the recipient’s neck by its speed and force and cause death.
DISPOSE OUR DAYS IN THY PEACE, AND COMMAND US TO BE DELIVERED FROM ETERNAL DAMNATION, AND TO BE NUMBERED IN THE FLOCK OF THINE ELECT.
 
The following users thanked this post: Padraig, Fleur-de-Lys

Offline Vetus Ordo

  • St. Joseph's Workbench
  • Feldwebel
  • ***
  • Posts: 2507
  • Thanked: 1992 times
  • Religion: The Way
Re: History in Pictures
« Reply #91 on: September 05, 2019, 05:15:24 PM »
The martyrdom of Father Pinot: The martyr priest Noel Pinot executed in the guillotine for being a priest refractory to the revolution. He went up to the scaffold carrying the sacred ornaments, since he had been caught in a hidden celebration of the Mass for the faithful Catholics ... His climb to the scaffold was to continue and consummate the Mass:

Introibo ad altare Dei, ad Deum qui laetificat juventutem meam…



The last of 16 children, who was born in the home of pious father in Angers (West France) on December 19, 1747, on Christmas Eve, received a name at baptism that should remember Christmas: "Noël" (In Latin it would be "Natalis" and in Italian "Natale"). This child brought not only Christmas joy to his large family, but also to the Church the honor of a new martyr of the Holy Eucharist. With the Oratorians in Angers the boy received a good education. In December 1770 the priestly ordination made him a devout and kind diocesan priest who developed a precious work in his place. The first 10 years he worked as a chaplain in Bousse (Sarthe) and in Corze. In June 1781 he returned to the bishopric city of Angers to finish his theology studies, which would culminate with an academic degree. During this period, Noel was a chaplain at the Hospital of the incurable in Angers. On February 6, 1788 he received the title of Magister Artium. Shortly after he was appointed pastor of Saint-Aubin in Lauroux-Béconnais, a relatively large parish, which had 3,000 souls. Here he worked as a good shepherd but only for two years, for he soon entered the storm of the French Revolution that barely broke out.

On July 12, 1791 the Civil Constitution was agreed in Paris. Father Pinot refused, with other brave priests, to take an oath to this anticlerical constitution. In his sermon on February 27, 1791 he criticized it strongly and was immediately denounced to the authorities. On March 5 he was taken prisoner and taken to Angers, where seven days later he was banned from practicing his profession as a priest. Under these circumstances he had no choice but to hide. First at the Hospital of the incurable in Angers. After looking for him there, he took the life of a persecuted priest for two years, free as a bird and fleeing from one place to another. Although always prepared to flee, he kept secretly offering Holy Mass and administering the sacraments. When the Catholics of the Vendée rose for a short time successfully against the terror regime, Father Pinot was able to return to his parish; but only for a short time could he enjoy his freedom, since the uprising of Catholics was demolished from Paris. The father had to hide again, and not only this: a sum of money was offered to whom would deliver him - dead or alive - to the tyrants of the Revolution. On the night of February 9, 1794, Father Pinot was preparing in a distant hacienda named Milanderie to celebrate Holy Mass. All preparations were already made and the father was going to put the alb on when the guard broke in and prepared himself to make a thorough review of the place. Father Pinot hid as quickly as possible in a box, still in his alb. There he was discovered and taken prisoner. His priestly vocation, together with the fact of having celebrated Holy Mass, was enough to dictate the death penalty and his execution on the same day. The torture would be like the celebration of his last Mass, his final offering.

Thus Father Pinot went up to the gallows, dressed in alb and chasuble. Moments before his decapitation he had to take off the chasuble, but the faithful later put the vestment on after the consummation of the sacrifice. On October 21, 1926, Pope Pius XI beatified this brave priest by saying: "Noel Pinot testified, taking until the moment of his execution the chasuble, demonstrating that the primary, most important and most sacred task of the priest is the celebration of the Holy Eucharist according to the order of the Lord."
DISPOSE OUR DAYS IN THY PEACE, AND COMMAND US TO BE DELIVERED FROM ETERNAL DAMNATION, AND TO BE NUMBERED IN THE FLOCK OF THINE ELECT.
 
The following users thanked this post: mikemac, Maximilian, Prayerful

Offline Vetus Ordo

  • St. Joseph's Workbench
  • Feldwebel
  • ***
  • Posts: 2507
  • Thanked: 1992 times
  • Religion: The Way
Re: History in Pictures
« Reply #92 on: September 13, 2019, 02:39:24 PM »
Al-Qadib (السيف القَضيب)



Al-Qadib is a thin-bladed sword which, it was said, resembled a rod. It was a sword of defense or companionship for the traveller but not used to battle. Written on the side of the sword in silver is the inscription: “There is no god but God, Muhammad the apostle of God–Muhammad b. Abdallah b. Abd al-Muttalib.” There is no indication in any historical source that this sword was used or in any battle. It stayed in the house of the prophet Muhammad and was only used later by the Fatimid caliphs. The sword is 100 cm in length and has a scabbard of dyed animal hide. Today the sword is housed in the Topkapı Museum, Istanbul.

Al-Ma’thur (السيف المأثُوُر)



Al-Ma’thur, also known as “Ma’thur al-Fijar” is the sword which was owned by the prophet Muhammad before he received his first revelations in Mecca. It was willed to him by his father. The prophet Muhammad migrated with the sword from Mecca to Medina, and the sword remained with him until it was transferred, along with other war equipment, to Ali b. Abi Talib. The blade is 99 cm in length. The handle is of gold in the shape of two serpents, and is encrusted with emeralds and turquoise. Near the handle is a Kufic inscription saying: ‘Abdallah b. ‘Abd al-Muttalib. Today the sword is housed in the Topkapı Museum, Istanbul.
DISPOSE OUR DAYS IN THY PEACE, AND COMMAND US TO BE DELIVERED FROM ETERNAL DAMNATION, AND TO BE NUMBERED IN THE FLOCK OF THINE ELECT.
 

Offline red solo cup

  • John 6:56
  • St. Joseph's Workbench
  • Hauptmann
  • ****
  • Posts: 5593
  • Thanked: 2363 times
  • Religion: Fair weather Catholic
"It's so lonely 'round the fields of Athenry"