Author Topic: History in Pictures  (Read 7841 times)

Offline Pon de Replay

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Re: History in Pictures
« Reply #30 on: May 11, 2019, 11:13:22 AM »
Beautiful shot (post no. 29).  It looks more classically Roman as a mosque than it would as a church.  Those glistening chandeliers are an eyesore, though.  Mohammedans seem to love them for some reason.
"The sneakiness of prigs, the conventicle secrecy, gloomy concepts like hell, like sacrifice of the guiltless, like unio mystica in drinking blood; above all, the slowly fanned fire of revenge, of chandala revenge—all that is what became master over Rome."

Rome sank to whoredom and became a stew
The Caesars became beasts, and God—a Jew!
 
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Offline Vetus Ordo

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Re: History in Pictures
« Reply #31 on: May 11, 2019, 02:54:39 PM »
Beautiful shot (post no. 29).  It looks more classically Roman as a mosque than it would as a church.  Those glistening chandeliers are an eyesore, though.  Mohammedans seem to love them for some reason.

It's a way to bring a huge space down to a more human scale. In olden days, the lighting it provided (usually oil lamps) would be closer to the believers standing and prostrating on the rug, therefore it was more useful to lower the chandeliers than putting them high in the ceiling of the mosque itself.
« Last Edit: May 11, 2019, 03:17:47 PM by Vetus Ordo »
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Offline Vetus Ordo

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Re: History in Pictures
« Reply #32 on: May 11, 2019, 02:56:38 PM »
Coincidentally, we celebrate Constantinople's birthday today. It was dedicated on May 11th, AD 330.


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Offline Vetus Ordo

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Re: History in Pictures
« Reply #33 on: May 12, 2019, 07:58:19 PM »
Ritual sacrifice of Roman prisoners of war by the Germanic Frisians; year AD 28. Illustration by Milek Jakubiec.

The scene depicts events leading up to the Battle of Baduhenna Forest, which occurred in the year AD 28, somewhere in the north of what is now the Netherlands.



The battle of Baduhenna Forest occurred when the Roman military attempted to crush a revolt by the Frisians, a Germanic people inhabiting the coastal areas of the Wadden sea. Up until that year, the small tribe had avoided conflict with the gigantic superpower by remaining neutral in all the conflicts the Empire had been waging throughout Germany. They had even submitted to Roman power without a fight in the year 12 B.C., when the governor of Gaul, Nero Claudius Drusus, marched through their territory while on campaign against other Germanic peoples.

After the 12 B.C. campaign, Drusus imposed only a light tribute burden on the Frisians, which included providing young men for military service. A subsequent Roman governor however, vastly increased the tax burden, decimating the herds and crops of the beleaguered Frisians and creating widespread discontent.

In the year AD 28, after their wives and children had been taken in lieu of the tribute they’d been unable to pay, the outraged tribesmen rose in open revolt. The enraged Germans turned upon the soldiers tasked with collecting the tax and massacred them. The Roman historian Tacitus states that the Roman soldiers were executed by hanging after being taken prisoner, as depicted in the illustration. This almost certainly implies ritual human sacrifice, which was a common practice among the Celtic and Germanic natives of Europe. The corrupt governor fled shamefully and was pursued to a nearby fort, which was then surrounded and besieged by vindictive rebel tribesmen.

News of the revolt reached Lucius Apronius, the propraetor of Germania Inferior province. Sensing the emergent nature of the matters at hand, Apronius gathered a sizeable army of both Roman legionaries and Germanic auxiliaries to try and stamp out the revolt. Rushing to the besieged governor’s rescue, Apronius and his forces began devastating Frisian farmsteads and killing women and children. This shameful and unsavory tactic was successful in that it forced the Frisians to abandon their siege of the fort and rush back to defend their families. Having lifted the siege and rescued the governor, Apronius decided to prosecute the issue to its bitter end. He built bridges and cleared paths through forests in an effort to pursue and annihilate the Frisians. The Romans tracked the fleeing refugees to a forest that was sacred to the goddess Baduhenna, where the terrified people had fled for safety. There, the tribesmen stood their ground and turned to fight a desperate battle against the Romans, in defense of their families. In spite of sending reinforcements into the fray, Apronius’ forces were resoundingly defeated and put to flight. The Roman general was himself forced to flee in order to save his own life. Over the course of the following two days, as the Romans reached safety and began piecing together an understanding of everything that happened, they would be horrified by the tidings they’d receive: Nine hundred or so Romans who hadn’t managed to flee the initial clash, had been surrounded in Baduhenna wood and killed the following day while fighting with desperate courage. Another four hundred had fled to the farmstead of a Frisian named Cruptorix, who was known to the Romans because he had once served in their army as an auxiliary. These soldiers were tracked down and surrounded there by the vengeful tribesmen. Knowing the horrors that awaited them if they were taken prisoner, the besieged Romans chose to commit suicide rather than surrender.

Not surprisingly, the hellish episode caused the Romans to suddenly lose interest in tampering with the locals. Forts were abandoned and the tribespeople were left to their own devices from thence forward. The Romans did not even venture to carry out punitive revenge campaigns or attempt to recover bodies for burial; the matter was left as it stood. The Frisians were thus liberated from the yoke of Roman oppression and news of their victory spread like wildfire. As a result, the Frisians gained a great deal of prestige among all the tribes of Germania.

Of note is the name of one of the Frisians who may have been involved in this episode, the farmer and former Roman soldier, Cruptorix. Enigmatically, his name appears to be Celtic, rather than Germanic. In like manner, numerous Germanic tribesmen from other tribes in that immediate vicinity, notably the Sicambri and Ampsivarii, appear in the historical record with seemingly Celtic names. Some modern historians and linguists have taken this as evidence of a Celtic origin for many German tribes inhabiting the area, or at least of a Celtic origin for their ruling dynasties. Others have posited the existence of a separate language, thought of as transitionary between Celtic and Germanic, or perhaps a hybrid creole between the two. The term most often used for this hypothetical and undefined linguistic zone is “Nordwestblock”.

Source:

Cornelius Tacitus. “The Annals”. Book 4, section 72.
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Offline Vetus Ordo

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Re: History in Pictures
« Reply #34 on: May 14, 2019, 11:46:01 PM »


Persecution in the West led many Knights Templar, especially from Germany and Poland to flee to Wallachia where Prince Basarab (1310-1352) accorded them safe harbor. The Wallachian prince defied Hungarian domination and when the royal army led by King Carol Robert invaded his principality and entered a narrow pass, probably in the vicinity of the fortress of Poenari, the Wallachians, with probable support from Tatar troops and the Templar Knights, sprang a carefully-prepared ambush on the king’s army on November 9, 1330. The battle of Posada lasted for three days and Carol Robert barely escaped with his life, having to flee after he changed clothes with one of his nobles.
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Re: History in Pictures
« Reply #35 on: May 16, 2019, 06:45:30 AM »
Ritual sacrifice of Roman prisoners of war by the Germanic Frisians; year AD 28. Illustration by Milek Jakubiec.

The scene depicts events leading up to the Battle of Baduhenna Forest, which occurred in the year AD 28, somewhere in the north of what is now the Netherlands.



The battle of Baduhenna Forest occurred when the Roman military attempted to crush a revolt by the Frisians, a Germanic people inhabiting the coastal areas of the Wadden sea. Up until that year, the small tribe had avoided conflict with the gigantic superpower by remaining neutral in all the conflicts the Empire had been waging throughout Germany. They had even submitted to Roman power without a fight in the year 12 B.C., when the governor of Gaul, Nero Claudius Drusus, marched through their territory while on campaign against other Germanic peoples.

After the 12 B.C. campaign, Drusus imposed only a light tribute burden on the Frisians, which included providing young men for military service. A subsequent Roman governor however, vastly increased the tax burden, decimating the herds and crops of the beleaguered Frisians and creating widespread discontent.

In the year AD 28, after their wives and children had been taken in lieu of the tribute they’d been unable to pay, the outraged tribesmen rose in open revolt. The enraged Germans turned upon the soldiers tasked with collecting the tax and massacred them. The Roman historian Tacitus states that the Roman soldiers were executed by hanging after being taken prisoner, as depicted in the illustration. This almost certainly implies ritual human sacrifice, which was a common practice among the Celtic and Germanic natives of Europe. The corrupt governor fled shamefully and was pursued to a nearby fort, which was then surrounded and besieged by vindictive rebel tribesmen.

News of the revolt reached Lucius Apronius, the propraetor of Germania Inferior province. Sensing the emergent nature of the matters at hand, Apronius gathered a sizeable army of both Roman legionaries and Germanic auxiliaries to try and stamp out the revolt. Rushing to the besieged governor’s rescue, Apronius and his forces began devastating Frisian farmsteads and killing women and children. This shameful and unsavory tactic was successful in that it forced the Frisians to abandon their siege of the fort and rush back to defend their families. Having lifted the siege and rescued the governor, Apronius decided to prosecute the issue to its bitter end. He built bridges and cleared paths through forests in an effort to pursue and annihilate the Frisians. The Romans tracked the fleeing refugees to a forest that was sacred to the goddess Baduhenna, where the terrified people had fled for safety. There, the tribesmen stood their ground and turned to fight a desperate battle against the Romans, in defense of their families. In spite of sending reinforcements into the fray, Apronius’ forces were resoundingly defeated and put to flight. The Roman general was himself forced to flee in order to save his own life. Over the course of the following two days, as the Romans reached safety and began piecing together an understanding of everything that happened, they would be horrified by the tidings they’d receive: Nine hundred or so Romans who hadn’t managed to flee the initial clash, had been surrounded in Baduhenna wood and killed the following day while fighting with desperate courage. Another four hundred had fled to the farmstead of a Frisian named Cruptorix, who was known to the Romans because he had once served in their army as an auxiliary. These soldiers were tracked down and surrounded there by the vengeful tribesmen. Knowing the horrors that awaited them if they were taken prisoner, the besieged Romans chose to commit suicide rather than surrender.

Not surprisingly, the hellish episode caused the Romans to suddenly lose interest in tampering with the locals. Forts were abandoned and the tribespeople were left to their own devices from thence forward. The Romans did not even venture to carry out punitive revenge campaigns or attempt to recover bodies for burial; the matter was left as it stood. The Frisians were thus liberated from the yoke of Roman oppression and news of their victory spread like wildfire. As a result, the Frisians gained a great deal of prestige among all the tribes of Germania.

Of note is the name of one of the Frisians who may have been involved in this episode, the farmer and former Roman soldier, Cruptorix. Enigmatically, his name appears to be Celtic, rather than Germanic. In like manner, numerous Germanic tribesmen from other tribes in that immediate vicinity, notably the Sicambri and Ampsivarii, appear in the historical record with seemingly Celtic names. Some modern historians and linguists have taken this as evidence of a Celtic origin for many German tribes inhabiting the area, or at least of a Celtic origin for their ruling dynasties. Others have posited the existence of a separate language, thought of as transitionary between Celtic and Germanic, or perhaps a hybrid creole between the two. The term most often used for this hypothetical and undefined linguistic zone is “Nordwestblock”.

Source:

Cornelius Tacitus. “The Annals”. Book 4, section 72.
It's interesting to have ritual hanging confirmed by Roman sources. The famous Iron Age Bog People founding peat bogs across N. Europe show examples of what is called a triune death. They had had their throats cut, their heads bashed in and been strangled. All of them occurred at the same time.
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Offline mikemac

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Re: History in Pictures
« Reply #36 on: May 16, 2019, 03:06:30 PM »
Bog bodies are kings sacrificed by Celts
Mar 28, 2017
https://www.irishcentral.com/news/bog-bodies-are-kings-sacrificed-by-celts-says-expert-129289548-237410131



The latest Iron Age bog body dating back to at least 2,000 BC was discovered near Portlaoise in the Irish Midlands

An expert has stated that the latest bog body found in Ireland has proven that belief that the Celts ritually sacrificed their kings to the Gods. The body also proves they underwent horrible deaths if the times turned bad under their reign.

The latest Iron Age bog body dating back to at least 2,000 BC was discovered near Portlaoise in the Irish midlands by an alert bog worker and it bears the same hallmarks of ritual torture that two other famous bodies have.

Ned Kelly, keeper of antiquities at the National Museum of Ireland told the Irish Examiner that a clear pattern has emerged in each case.

"We do not think of these bog bodies in the same way as we do axes or implements that are found," he said. "You have to remember that these are individuals and it is absolutely essential to deal with their remains in a dignified manner. There would be no justification for taking these bodies unless we do so with respect and with the serious intent to tell their stories on their behalf.

"I am quite convinced we are dealing with an Iron Age male, one who was subjected to a ritual killing. There are cuts and marks on the body that indicate that this is somebody who was done to death."

The body is linked closely to two other major finds, the discoveries of Old Croghan Man and Clonycavan Man, also found in Irish bogs, both of whom were ritually sacrificed.

Human sacrifice was apparently a normal part of the Celtic rituals, especially of kings in hard times.

"The killings tend to be excessive,"  Kelly, said "in that more is done to the bodies than would be required to bring about their deaths. Bog bodies may have their throats cut, been stabbed in the heart and have other cut marks. However, it is absolutely not torture, but a form of ritual sacrifice."

"The king had great power but also great responsibility to ensure the prosperity of his people. Through his marriage on his inauguration to the goddess of the land, he was meant to guarantee her benevolence. He had to ensure the land was productive, so if the weather turned bad, or there was plague, cattle disease or losses in war, he was held personally responsible."

At 6’6", Old Croghan Man, who was killed between 362 BC and 175 BC, was a giant of a man. he bore every appearance of a nobleman from his well-manicured soft hands to his diet, which was rich in meat.

Clonycavan Man was little more than 5 ft and used pine resin to keep his hair in place.

Kelly says Old Croghan Man died horribly, having holes cut in his upper arms through which a rope was pulled through in order to restrain him. He was stabbed repeatedly and he had his nipples sliced before he was finally cut in half.

Clonycavan Man was disemboweled and struck three times across the head with an ax and once across the body and also had his nipples cut.

Cutting the nipples was more than torture. The aim was to dethrone the king. "Sucking a king’s nipples was a gesture of submission in ancient Ireland," says Kelly. "Cutting them would have made him incapable of kingship in this world or the next."

"By using a range of methods to kill the victim, the ancient Irish sacrificed to the goddess in all her forms. This manner of death is peculiar to the ritual killing of kings. It means that a king was being decommissioned."

"I think it is important we treat them with respect. They have come down to us with a story to tell and it is our duty to tell that story on their behalf. If we do that, it will give added meaning to their lives."
Like John Vennari (RIP) said "Why not just do it?  What would it hurt?"
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Offline Josephine87

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Re: History in Pictures
« Reply #37 on: May 16, 2019, 04:55:12 PM »
That Frisian  story would make a great movie. Any good books you can recommend on that besides Tacitus? Osprey should get on that.

Also who was persecuting the Knights Templar and why?

I love this thread.
« Last Edit: May 16, 2019, 10:32:49 PM by Josephine87 »
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Offline Jacob

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Re: History in Pictures
« Reply #38 on: May 16, 2019, 06:54:47 PM »
Also who was persecuting the Knights Templar and why?

The king of France, 'cause he wanted their money.
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Offline red solo cup

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Re: History in Pictures
« Reply #39 on: May 17, 2019, 05:31:58 AM »
Bog bodies are kings sacrificed by Celts
Mar 28, 2017
https://www.irishcentral.com/news/bog-bodies-are-kings-sacrificed-by-celts-says-expert-129289548-237410131



The latest Iron Age bog body dating back to at least 2,000 BC was discovered near Portlaoise in the Irish Midlands

An expert has stated that the latest bog body found in Ireland has proven that belief that the Celts ritually sacrificed their kings to the Gods. The body also proves they underwent horrible deaths if the times turned bad under their reign.

The latest Iron Age bog body dating back to at least 2,000 BC was discovered near Portlaoise in the Irish midlands by an alert bog worker and it bears the same hallmarks of ritual torture that two other famous bodies have.

Ned Kelly, keeper of antiquities at the National Museum of Ireland told the Irish Examiner that a clear pattern has emerged in each case.

"We do not think of these bog bodies in the same way as we do axes or implements that are found," he said. "You have to remember that these are individuals and it is absolutely essential to deal with their remains in a dignified manner. There would be no justification for taking these bodies unless we do so with respect and with the serious intent to tell their stories on their behalf.

"I am quite convinced we are dealing with an Iron Age male, one who was subjected to a ritual killing. There are cuts and marks on the body that indicate that this is somebody who was done to death."

The body is linked closely to two other major finds, the discoveries of Old Croghan Man and Clonycavan Man, also found in Irish bogs, both of whom were ritually sacrificed.

Human sacrifice was apparently a normal part of the Celtic rituals, especially of kings in hard times.

"The killings tend to be excessive,"  Kelly, said "in that more is done to the bodies than would be required to bring about their deaths. Bog bodies may have their throats cut, been stabbed in the heart and have other cut marks. However, it is absolutely not torture, but a form of ritual sacrifice."

"The king had great power but also great responsibility to ensure the prosperity of his people. Through his marriage on his inauguration to the goddess of the land, he was meant to guarantee her benevolence. He had to ensure the land was productive, so if the weather turned bad, or there was plague, cattle disease or losses in war, he was held personally responsible."

At 6’6", Old Croghan Man, who was killed between 362 BC and 175 BC, was a giant of a man. he bore every appearance of a nobleman from his well-manicured soft hands to his diet, which was rich in meat.

Clonycavan Man was little more than 5 ft and used pine resin to keep his hair in place.

Kelly says Old Croghan Man died horribly, having holes cut in his upper arms through which a rope was pulled through in order to restrain him. He was stabbed repeatedly and he had his nipples sliced before he was finally cut in half.

Clonycavan Man was disemboweled and struck three times across the head with an ax and once across the body and also had his nipples cut.

Cutting the nipples was more than torture. The aim was to dethrone the king. "Sucking a king’s nipples was a gesture of submission in ancient Ireland," says Kelly. "Cutting them would have made him incapable of kingship in this world or the next."

"By using a range of methods to kill the victim, the ancient Irish sacrificed to the goddess in all her forms. This manner of death is peculiar to the ritual killing of kings. It means that a king was being decommissioned."

"I think it is important we treat them with respect. They have come down to us with a story to tell and it is our duty to tell that story on their behalf. If we do that, it will give added meaning to their lives."
As I recall the writhing of the kings dying body would be used to predict the future.
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Offline Vetus Ordo

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Re: History in Pictures
« Reply #40 on: May 19, 2019, 08:06:18 PM »


"No friend ever served me, and no enemy ever wronged me, whom I have not repaid in full." (The Epitaph of Lucius Cornelius Sulla)

Lucius Cornelius Sulla Felix, (born 138 BC — died 79 BC, Puteoli [Pozzuoli, near Naples, Italy]), Victor in the first full-scale Civil War in Roman history (88 BC – 82 BC) and subsequently Dictator (82 BC – 79 BC), who carried out notable constitutional reforms in an attempt to strengthen the Roman Republic and stunned his contemporaries by releasing voluntarily his office of absolute dictator. Sulla was a fearsome general who never lost a battle against his Roman and foreign adversaries and was described by his enemies as "having cunning of a Fox and courage of a Lion".
DISPOSE OUR DAYS IN THY PEACE, AND COMMAND US TO BE DELIVERED FROM ETERNAL DAMNATION, AND TO BE NUMBERED IN THE FLOCK OF THINE ELECT.
 
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Offline Vetus Ordo

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Re: History in Pictures
« Reply #41 on: May 19, 2019, 09:19:35 PM »
Photo of the grave of Adolph Korn in the Gooch Cemetery in Mason, Texas. Adolph was tending sheep on New Year's Day, 1870, when three Apache warriors thundered up on horseback, grabbed Adolph, hit him over the head with a gun, pulled him onto a horse, and rode away.

That was the last Adolph's Mason County family saw of him until nearly three years later, when a band of Comanches, who had received him in a trade with his abductors, surrendered him to government authorities in Fort Sill, Oklahoma, on November 14, 1872. Adolph had grown to love life with his captors and rejected the life of his family after being reunited with them. He had trouble readjusting and compiled a lengthy arrest record. He eventually moved out to a cave and became a hermit until his early death.

DISPOSE OUR DAYS IN THY PEACE, AND COMMAND US TO BE DELIVERED FROM ETERNAL DAMNATION, AND TO BE NUMBERED IN THE FLOCK OF THINE ELECT.
 
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Offline Vetus Ordo

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Re: History in Pictures
« Reply #42 on: May 19, 2019, 09:32:37 PM »
Young Sufi apprentice, around 1870.

DISPOSE OUR DAYS IN THY PEACE, AND COMMAND US TO BE DELIVERED FROM ETERNAL DAMNATION, AND TO BE NUMBERED IN THE FLOCK OF THINE ELECT.
 

Offline red solo cup

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Re: History in Pictures
« Reply #43 on: May 20, 2019, 12:26:11 PM »
Photo of the grave of Adolph Korn in the Gooch Cemetery in Mason, Texas. Adolph was tending sheep on New Year's Day, 1870, when three Apache warriors thundered up on horseback, grabbed Adolph, hit him over the head with a gun, pulled him onto a horse, and rode away.

That was the last Adolph's Mason County family saw of him until nearly three years later, when a band of Comanches, who had received him in a trade with his abductors, surrendered him to government authorities in Fort Sill, Oklahoma, on November 14, 1872. Adolph had grown to love life with his captors and rejected the life of his family after being reunited with them. He had trouble readjusting and compiled a lengthy arrest record. He eventually moved out to a cave and became a hermit until his early death.


Another person who chose to stay with her captors was Cynthia Ann Parker. Kidnapped in 1836 as a nine year old, she was assimilated and later gave birth to the celebrated Comanche leader Quanah Parker.  "Empire of the Summer Moon" by Sam Gwynne gives a full account.
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Offline Fleur-de-Lys

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Re: History in Pictures
« Reply #44 on: May 20, 2019, 12:42:47 PM »


Quanah Parker December 1889
 
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