Author Topic: Anam Cara  (Read 383 times)

Offline Yankee

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Anam Cara
« on: May 16, 2018, 08:37:37 AM »
Anyone believe in this?
"What bad taste You have, Lord, to love me, hideous as I am; but do not, on any account, change that bad taste, lest I be exposed to the danger of Your putting an angel in my place." -St Teresa
 

Offline St.Justin

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Re: Anam Cara
« Reply #1 on: May 16, 2018, 01:01:07 PM »
Lordy, Lordy. What next? It ain't like we don't already have enough crazies in this world. People giving each other spiritual direction?. Sounds like a astra-logical operation. call me and I will tell you all about you.
 

Offline Gardener

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Re: Anam Cara
« Reply #2 on: May 16, 2018, 01:07:22 PM »
No.

Read the history of it:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anam_Cara

Its modern usage is NOT what the Irish ascetics and early Desert Fathers were doing.

The modern variant is a spiritual director, and the ancient usage is analogous to this.

It's NOT just random laity giving each other advice as if able to read someone's heart or soul.

D.A.N.G.E.R.O.U.S.

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Offline Yankee

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Re: Anam Cara
« Reply #3 on: May 16, 2018, 06:03:08 PM »
Maybe I misunderstood it? I read that it was just an intense bond between souls. I assumed it meant like between David and Jonathan
"What bad taste You have, Lord, to love me, hideous as I am; but do not, on any account, change that bad taste, lest I be exposed to the danger of Your putting an angel in my place." -St Teresa
 

Offline Michael Wilson

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Re: Anam Cara
« Reply #4 on: May 16, 2018, 08:27:13 PM »
The ability to read another's soul or conscience is almost always a gift that Our Lord only gives to Confessors and spiritual directors; not to best friends.
"The World Must Conform to Our Lord and not He to it." Rev. Dennis Fahey CSSP
 
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Offline MundaCorMeum

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Re: Anam Cara
« Reply #5 on: May 16, 2018, 09:03:26 PM »
never heard of it
 

Offline lauermar

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Re: Anam Cara
« Reply #6 on: May 16, 2018, 09:31:25 PM »
http://www.basaltheritage.org/anamcaradesigns.com/meaningofaramcara.html

"Anam Cara refers to the Celtic spiritual belief of souls connecting and bonding.

In Celtic Spiritual tradition, it is believed that the soul radiates all about the physical body, what some refer to as an aura. When you connect with another person and become completely open and trusting with that individual, your two souls begin to flow together. Should such a deep bond be formed, it is said you have found your Anam Cara or soul friend.

Your Anam Cara always accepts you as you truly are, holding you in beauty and light. In order to appreciate this relationship, you must first recognize your own inner light and beauty. This is not always easy to do. The Celts believed that forming an Anam Cara friendship would help you to awaken your awareness of your own nature and experience the joys of others.

According to John O'Donahue, an accomplished Irish poet, philosopher and Catholic priest, "...You are joined in an ancient and eternal union with humanity that cuts across all barriers of time, convention, philosophy and definition. When you are blessed with an anam cara, the Irish believe, you have arrived at that most sacred place: home."

I think it sounds like New Age or a type of indigenous pagan belief system.
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Offline St.Justin

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Re: Anam Cara
« Reply #7 on: May 16, 2018, 09:34:56 PM »
John O'Donohue (1 January 1956 4 January 2008) was an Irish poet, author, priest, and Hegelian philosopher.
 

Offline Non Nobis

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Re: Anam Cara
« Reply #8 on: May 16, 2018, 11:30:13 PM »
Maybe it would be misleading to use the same expression Anum Cara, but I think our Guardian Angel should be an intimate friend of our soul, even if we cannot know his mind (and must share ours with him). I know the meaning is not the same, but the expression sounds rather beautiful.  How about the Latin "animae amicum"?
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Offline Yankee

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Re: Anam Cara
« Reply #9 on: May 17, 2018, 06:51:13 AM »
I guess some of the modern things seem New Agey but what about in the way St. Briget mentioned it? Just two souls very closely united?
"What bad taste You have, Lord, to love me, hideous as I am; but do not, on any account, change that bad taste, lest I be exposed to the danger of Your putting an angel in my place." -St Teresa
 

Offline Maximilian

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Re: Anam Cara
« Reply #10 on: May 17, 2018, 01:40:49 PM »

what about in the way St. Briget mentioned it? Just two souls very closely united?

Sounds very intriguing. What would be useful is to have evidence of a tradition of this practice in between St. Bridget and today.

One could have confidence that this was not a New Age creation if there were some sort of lineage of practice through the Middle Ages.

Perhaps the book you mention by John O'Donohue goes into that aspect?