Author Topic: Jannah, virtual reality, eternity, and boredom  (Read 6337 times)

Offline The Curt Jester

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Re: Jannah, virtual reality, eternity, and boredom
« Reply #60 on: January 09, 2018, 09:54:40 PM »
Wouldn’t it only be a disappointment if it never happened?  Anticipating something and not getting it is a let-down, I agree.  Let’s say you and I were on a flight to Tokyo and there was a loud, incessantly crying baby on board.  I might turn to you and say, “hypothetical question, Curt.  Would you enjoy if it I had a way of making that baby stop crying?”  You would probably roll your eyes and say, “yes, I would enjoy that very much.”  And I’d say, “well, too bad, because I don’t have any cure for the crying baby,” and you’d grumble, “I’ve always disliked hypothetical questions.”

But if, instead, I were to take out my iPod and change some settings, and the baby suddenly stopped crying, and if I said, “the truth is, Curt, we are living in a virtual reality and I’ve hacked into the program that runs it, and I can block out the sound of a crying baby as sure as anyone can block out images on their web browser,” I don’t see how you’d be disappointed.  Granted, it is highly unlikely that this would ever happen, but if it did happen, you would not be disappointed.

So how would “living in an imaginary world” be “a disappointment”?  It wouldn’t be any more “imaginary” than this one.  On every sensual front it would be as materially real.  I can understand your objection to the question on the grounds that imagining something but not being able to actually enjoy it is, alas, the frustrating curse of Tantalus, to which you prefer not to be subjected.  But don’t vote “no” on those grounds.  The question isn’t, “do you enjoy being asked to consider this unlikely hypothetical?”  Only vote “no” if you think you would truly not enjoy (or not want to enjoy) experiencing the greatest sensual reality you can imagine.

If one person could hack into another person's virtual reality, pleasure would certainly be fast fleeting, would it not?   You just made another argument against it.  Still voted no.
The royal feast was done; the King
Sought some new sport to banish care,
And to his jester cried: "Sir Fool,
Kneel now, and make for us a prayer!"

The jester doffed his cap and bells,
And stood the mocking court before;
They could not see the bitter smile
Behind the painted grin he wore.

He bowed his head, and bent his knee
Upon the Monarch's silken stool;
His pleading voice arose: "O Lord,
Be merciful to me, a fool!"
 

Offline Pon de Replay

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Re: Jannah, virtual reality, eternity, and boredom
« Reply #61 on: January 10, 2018, 08:30:30 AM »
If one person could hack into another person's virtual reality, pleasure would certainly be fast fleeting, would it not?

Only if you insist on mistaking one hypothetical for another.  In that scenario I was only trying to illustrate how you wouldn't be disappointed.  I can make the same point without using virtual reality:

Quote
But if, instead, I were to take out my iPod and change some settings, and the baby suddenly stopped crying, and if I said, “the truth is, Curt, we are living in a virtual reality and I’ve hacked into the program that runs it, and I can block out the sound of a crying baby as sure as anyone can block out images on their web browser,” say, "the truth is, Curt, I am a magical being from the planet Q'ah-Ru and have the telekinetic power to make babies stop crying," and if the baby then suddenly stopped crying, I don’t see how you’d be disappointed.  Granted, it is highly unlikely that this would ever happen, but if it did happen, you would not be disappointed.

But if you must be lawyerly about it, know that the word "endless" in the poll question denotes "without cessation," "uninterrupted," and "unperturbed by people hacking in."  (As I indicated to Max earlier, the most likely scenario for this virtual reality is that it would be a gift from a hyper-intelligent A.I., meaning that its intelligence would far exceed human intelligence and would therefore be immune to any nefarious human interference.  I agree with Non Nobis that we mortals are unlikely to engineer the nano- and bio-technology necessary for a true virtual reality on our own).  But as I also assured mikemac, the endlessness of your enjoyment would come with the proviso that you yourself could stop it at any time, if you felt an obligation to return to this reality, or if for some reason having every sensual delight you ever wanted turned out not to be to your liking.
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Offline james03

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Re: Jannah, virtual reality, eternity, and boredom
« Reply #62 on: April 26, 2018, 10:08:36 PM »
A really cool book on VR is CTRL-ALT-Revolt (check it out on Amazon).  The book takes a little to get things set up, then the author hits you with it.  When you get done you'll say this was the most creative book you've read.  Very entertaining.
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