Author Topic: Study Program on the Crisis  (Read 11431 times)

Offline Alphonsus Jr.

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Study Program on the Crisis
« on: April 06, 2013, 02:15:57 PM »
I've recently had cause to assemble a bit of a study list related to the Hippie Council, aka the Judas Council, aka the Second Vatican Council. See below. Feel free to make additional suggestions.

The Ottaviani Intervention: Short Critical Study of the New Order of Mass (also see the video on it on Youtube)

The Catechism of the Crisis in the Church, by Matthias Gaudron

The Rhine Flows into the Tiber: A History of Vatican II, by Ralph Wiltgen

The Second Vatican Council - An Unwritten Story, by Roberto de Mattei

One Hundred Years of Modernism: A Genealogy of the Principles of the Second Vatican Council, by Dominique Bourmaud

Iota Unum: A Study of Changes in the Catholic Church in the Twentieth Century, by Romano Amerio

The Great Facade: Vatican II and the Regime of Novelty in the Roman Catholic Church, by Christopher Ferrara and Thomas Woods

Work of Human Hands: A Theological Critique of the Mass of Paul VI, by Anthony Cekada (also search for the Youtube playlist on this) (also go to Philothea Press and read for free the first few parts of this book; it blows away the modernist idea that preference is in any way part of the correct calculus of Mass attendance)

Open Letter to Confused Catholics, by Abp Marcel Lefebvre

Revolution and Counter-Revolution, by Plinio Correa de Oliveira

Sedevacantism: A False Solution to a Real Problem, by Christopher Gerard Brown

Also search the internet for this article:

Seattle Catholic "The Twenty Mysteries of the Rosary?"

Related to Benedict XVI, see this article:

"The Oath Against Modernism vs. the 'Hermeneutic of Continuity'"

Also search for these essays:

"Can Obedience Oblige us to Disobey?" by Abp. Marcel Lefebvre

"Is the New Catechism Catholic? Part 1" on the SSPX site

"The Post-Conciliar Church: A New Religion? Catholic FAQs" on the SSPX site

"The Theology and Spirituality of the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass" on the SSPX site

On Neocon/Neocath delusions, google for these articles:

"Revenge of the Neo-Cats" by Hilary White

&

"The Justice of the Term 'neo-Catholic'" by Christopher Ferrara

Also go to Audio Sancto, type the following in the search box, and listen to both results carefully:

The French Revolution

&

2008 Lenten Mission (Part 1): Recognizing the Signs of the Times

Finally, go to Youtube and watch the following. It's essential viewing. Watch all 14 parts:

Bp. Bernard Fellay: On the Crisis in the Church

Also search for this on Youtube:

The Enemy is Within,The Kiss of Judas Iscariot, by Fr. Michael Rodriguez

Finally, search on Youtube for this playlist:

Vatican II Wreckage

"At the close of a long life (for I was born in 1905 and I now see the year 1990), I can say that it has been marked by exceptional world events: three world wars, that which took place from 1914 to 1918, that which took place from 1939 to 1945, and that of the Second Vatican Council from 1962 to 1965. The disasters caused by these three wars, and especially by the last of them, are incalculable in the domain of material ruins, but even more so in the spiritual realm."

-Abp. Marcel Lefebvre, Prologue to his Spiritual Journey
« Last Edit: April 06, 2013, 11:05:36 PM by Alphonsus Jr. »
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Offline Kaesekopf

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Re: Study Program on the Crisis
« Reply #1 on: April 06, 2013, 10:43:04 PM »
This is getting pinned to the top.

Thanks.
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Offline Alphonsus Jr.

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Re: Study Program on the Crisis
« Reply #2 on: April 06, 2013, 10:58:10 PM »
This is getting pinned to the top.

Thanks.

My (dis?)pleasure.

I have a gnawing feeling that I've forgotten some crucial stuff though. I'm sure others will help fill the gaps.
« Last Edit: April 06, 2013, 11:00:40 PM by Alphonsus Jr. »
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Offline Mysterium Fidei

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Re: Study Program on the Crisis
« Reply #3 on: May 03, 2013, 09:32:52 AM »
Thanks for this list Alphonsus.
 

Offline tmw89

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Re: Study Program on the Crisis
« Reply #4 on: May 03, 2013, 09:40:27 AM »
I'd add the texts available on the main site of www.strobertbellarmine.net to that list... excellent resources.
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Offline VeraeFidei

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Re: Study Program on the Crisis
« Reply #5 on: May 03, 2013, 01:13:28 PM »
The Great Sacrilege by Fr. James Wathen.

One of the earliest-in-the-Crisis trad books.
 

Offline VeraeFidei

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Re: Study Program on the Crisis
« Reply #6 on: May 03, 2013, 01:14:15 PM »
Liberalism is a Sin by Fr. Felix Sarda y Salvany.
 

Offline VeraeFidei

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Re: Study Program on the Crisis
« Reply #7 on: May 03, 2013, 01:15:27 PM »
The Papal Encyclicals of the 18th, 19th, and early-to-mid 20th centuries are essential, too. TAN has them nicely compiled in The Popes Against Modern Errors.
 
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Offline Mysterium Fidei

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Re: Study Program on the Crisis
« Reply #8 on: May 03, 2013, 02:50:51 PM »
In honor on the man, I would add any of the works of Patrick Henry Omlor RIP.

Also I have found the book "No Crisis in the Church?" by Simon Galloway useful. The entire book is basically double columns in which a teaching of the Catholic Church is in one column and the contradictory teaching of the Counciliar Church is in the opposing column. It is described as: A  rigorous comparison of Catholic Church teachings before and after the Second Vatican Council.
« Last Edit: May 03, 2013, 03:46:18 PM by Mysterium Fidei »
 
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Offline Parresia

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Re: Study Program on the Crisis
« Reply #9 on: September 28, 2013, 10:12:15 PM »
The Second Vatican Council: An Unwritten Story Dr. Roberto de Mattei
 

Offline Michael Wilson

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Re: Study Program on the Crisis
« Reply #10 on: November 09, 2013, 11:34:20 AM »
I would add a few more tittles:
"They Have Uncrowned Him" Msgr. Lefebvre": It is extremely important to understand the Catholic principles of true freedom as taught by the Church and especially the Popes of the 19th C. (Gregory XVI, Pius IX, Leo XIII); and the false principles of Liberalism as were promoted by the intellectual authors of the French Revolution, Catholic Liberalism, and finally embodied in the document from Vatican II: "Dignitatis Humanae".  All traditionalist Catholics should read this book, outline it, study it and keep going back to it frequently; as Cardinal Ratzinger put it so succinctly:
Quote
The problem in the 1960s (ie at the Council) was to acquire the best expressed values of two centuries of "liberal" culture.  They are in fact values which, even if they are born outside the Church, can find their place-purified and corrected-in its vision of the world. This is what has been done. (in Conversation with Vittorio Messori, in the monthly Gesu, Nov. 1984, pg. 72),
It has been said elsewhere, that we don't really know what Dignitatis Humanae and the Council taught on religious liberty; if this is case with you, then read this book; Msgr. Lefebvre explains it very clearly and completely.
"Christ King of All Nations"; Rev. A. Phillippe C.S.S.R.  A small book written in Catechetical format of questions and answers on the subject of the Kingship of Christ; based on Pius XI's "Quas Primas" and other Papal Encyclicals.  Very easy to read and understand; published in the 1920's; its is even more important and necessary today than when it was originally published. Here is the introduction to the English edition written by Msgr. Lefebvre:
Quote
The doctrine exposed by Father Phillippe in his book Christ, King of Nations, by way of a "Catechism of the Rights of Our Lord in Society" is, without a doubt, very necessary to be brought to mind in our times.
   To abandon this article of our Faith, not only by liberal Catholics, but also by the hierarchy of the Church, quickly leads to apostasy and the secularization of societies which were once Catholic.
   Where Our Lord does not reign, Satan takes the Throne. To recall to mind today this fundamental doctrine is a very salutary work.  We strongly encourage the diffusion of this remarkable book which is simply an indispensable complement to our Catholic Catechism.
Blessed are those who work without rest for the extension of the Social Reign of Our Lord by the intercession of Mary, Queen.
Econe, November 30, 1988. The feast of St. Andrew
+Marcel Lefebvre
"The World Must Conform to Our Lord and not He to it." Rev. Dennis Fahey CSSP

"My brothers, all of you, if you are condemned to see the triumph of evil, never applaud it. Never say to evil: you are good; to decadence: you are progess; to death: you are life. Sanctify yourselves in the times wherein God has placed you; bewail the evils and the disorders which God tolerates; oppose them with the energy of your works and your efforts, your life uncontaminated by error, free from being led astray, in such a way that having lived here below, united with the Spirit of the Lord, you will be admitted to be made but one with Him forever and ever: But he who is joined to the Lord is one in spirit." Cardinal Pie of Potiers
 

Offline Christopher McAvoy

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Re: Study Program on the Crisis
« Reply #11 on: April 07, 2014, 02:17:28 AM »
I second the endorsements of "They have uncrowned him" and "The Great Sacrilege".

My perspective was mainly one of noticing the obvious things that were odd about the liturgy first, and realzing there was a bunch of crazy theology behind it, second. The second part came from studying both the histories, praying the divine office in the byzantine and medieval roman rites, and reading writings of the fathers, doctors, popes and patriarches of the past, seeing a big disconnection between the present. Besides experiencing the actual eucharistic liturgies themselves in both catholic and orthodox (schismatic) churches.

The Banished Heart by Dr. Jeffrey Hull, was one of the biggest influences on myself. I would add that to the list.

Some people accuse Dr. Hull over having an overly "Eastern Orthodox" perspective, but perhaps that's my own perspective and also why I found it to be so helpful. Having the perspective of the Eastern Catholic or Orthodox Churches regarding proper liturgical foundations is invaluable. I do not think the book is going to encourage anyone leave Rome. I feel that is an preposterous exagerration.

You see, to have the perspective which is that of a non-western (non-latin) perspective is very helpful, this clarifies that the Latin Church and her protestant offshoots are a liturgical anomolaly, when compared to the other rites of the church that have been completely cut off from the latin rite. Being cut off from a rite that has a contagious disease, is not entirely a disadvantage.

"The Battle for the American Church" was another formative book for me. an incredible book that documented complete sacrilidge and heresy prevalent after Vatican II. It documents the years 1964-1980 and no later. I was born in 1982, I had no idea just how openly and blantantly heresy was being promoted throughout the '70's in many dioceses, it must have been incredible. By the time I was a child in the early 1990's, being taught by the nashville dominican sisters of st cecilia, the damage control had already begun. I could see real problems, but the faith that I was taught was very orthodox and very traditional, as much as a child who doesnt know any better can tell, it encouraged me to  be the way I am today. Other than the lack of wimple, which a child tends to not notice as much, they still looked and dressed mostly the way dominican sisters had for a century or two.

"The Battle for the American Church" is a book that also however in about 3 pages, criticizes the SSPX, so it has a HINT only a HINT of neo-conservative slant to things. But the priest that wrote it was raised in a pre-vatican II world, so his perspectives were for the most part quite traditional as I recall. I loved that book, what it documents is amazing.


Quote
He observes, "Catholic apologists may not always be nice people, but even the most judicious and saintly of them have lost positions, promotions, and salary increases in the Catholic press, in colleges, seminaries, and diocesan offices simply because they preached the Church message precisely the way it was given---or opposed, even in gentlemanly fashion, distortions of that message. This is still 'the Battle' that Church authority continues to lose, as much in 1994 as in 1978." (Pg. 356)

He argues, "The Church is going nowhere, except in retreat, if her leadership does not find a way to win the war thrust upon her in 1967. Indeed, conditions may be worst in 1994 than they were in 1979. And will continue to be so, as long as important pastors think they can mediate issues that are nonnegotiable, or if they think war can be won without bloodshed, even without some of their own. Whole countries gave up their Catholic identity when that kind of thinking prevailed." (Pg. 107)

He summarizes, "If the renewal promised by John XXIII has failed, it is for the reason that important Church institutions have allowed themselves, or have been allowed, to separate themselves from the vicar of Christ. Party to that separation have been blocs of bishops whose policies after Vatican II reflected more the thinking of Rudolph Bultmann, Martin Heidegger, Max Weber, or Carl Rogers than the wisdom contained in Matthew, Mark, Luke and John, along with a variety of Pauls and Piuses through the centuries." (Pg. 139)

Kelly's tone of "alarm" may seem surprising, given the generally conservative tone of John Paul II's reign, and his successor Benedict XVI. But conservatives and traditionalists will still find much to agree with in this passionately-argued polemic.
Quote from the Amazon.com review for "Battle of the American Church Revisited"



« Last Edit: April 07, 2014, 02:29:27 AM by Christopher McAvoy »
 

Offline Christopher McAvoy

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Re: Study Program on the Crisis
« Reply #12 on: April 07, 2014, 03:15:24 AM »
Another profound influence on me was the writings of E. Michael Jones "Culture Wars" Magazine, as well as "Radio Roman Catholic" broadcasts (these broadcasts may be hard to find, but were excellent.)

E. Michael Jones on Pope Benedict XVI's Light of the World: Part 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16
(November/December 2010)http://www.culturewars.com/cwradio/Day%201%20Segment%201%20Light%20of%20the%20World%20Discussion.mp3
http://www.culturewars.com/Podcasts.html

This was one of the first times when i initially heard this in 2010 that I understood what Benedict's problems were.
Up until that point, I found him confusing, endorsing traditional faith and praxis, while at the same time, not entirely "practicing what he preaches" as far as actually ever celebrating the old mass publicly in any instance, which about 5 years ago partly baffled me. It essentially proves that he himself is a  symptom of the role confusion/theological inconsistency that was let lose in the 20th century.

He was a man of Vatican II, he wanted, as I understand it, to be in some sense of the world and not of the world at the same time, something no Pope had ever attempted to do before the '60's. To be "Ratzinger" the non-fallible theologian at the same time as being infallible Holy Lord Pope Benedict XVI. These two things can not coexist, he thought they could. This is a profound symptom of the modernist ethos. I can only like benedict, because at least he wore beautiful vestments frequently, but I certainly find him to be flawed, though much less so than , His Holiness Francis. But role confusion over what it is to be Pope, Their Holiness JP II, Francis and Benedixt XVI all share this same problem, one can produce a flow chart proving this, and someday I will, if no one else does. Ultimately they have more in common than differences. Though I do not think Benedict or JP II would have ever said something as dumb as "Who am I to judge"which Francis said. This was probably the worst statement a Pope has made in my lifetime.

Once again, Mr. Jones and a few of his friends, though not all,  have had some hostility to the SSPX, despite the fact that Mr. Jones, once kindly allowed Bishop Williamson to once stay at his house, for reasons I cant remember.  So even if officially he doesnt endorse them,  he understands the situation and is not necessarily against them. (whatever that means...)

I would mention, the writings of Fr. Gommar de Paw, I like him partly because I have encountered the working class liberalism and in it's inferiority complex which is prevalent in the archdiocese of baltimore. I have walked through the classroom he taught at for ten years before the vatican council ended, being intimately familiar with Mt. St. Mary's seminary (which is where I coincidently bought the "Battle for the American Church" book from it's used seminarian booksale.) I understand well that if you couldnt make it at Mt. St. mary's you couldnt make it anywhere, heretical ideas were impossible toe escape from in Roman Catholic Seminaries of the USA during the 60's and 70's, the tyranny of liberalism forced many good saint priests and religious to "GET OUT" ..

Quote
[Fr. Gommar A. DePauw is arguably the founder of the Traditional Roman  Catholic Movement.  He was a peritus at Vatican II, so he knew first-hand what was going on.  In 1964, already seeing what the consequences of Vatican II would be, he left his position as professor of Canon Law and Dean of Admissions at Mount Saint Mary's Seminary in Emmitsburg, Maryland, moved to New York City, and founded the Catholic Traditionalist Movement (CTM) there.  He publicly offered the Traditional Latin Mass in the Pan American Building there without the "permission" of the archbishop of New York, whom he claimed had no authority in the matter, citing Sacred Tradition and Pope St. Pius V's Quo Primum.

I especially recommend: In Memoriam: Francis Cardinal Spellman, 1889-1967, Protector of the Catholic Traditionalist Movement  Cardinal Spellman, is often forgotten as being very pro-tradition, since he died in 1967, he didnt live long enough to receive the respect that others did, and we dont know for certain what would have happened if he had lived into the 1970s, but the evidence is strong that he would have not gone along with the new theology and new mass. Cardinal Spellman, was not perfect, and has legitimate criticisms (his treatment of eastern catholics for example), but for the most part he was a well loved man. The fact that he kept things going in the tridentine way until he died was impressive. This is a man who carried weight, the fact that he did not like key decisions and outcomes from vatican II is deeply meaningful.
"Counciliar or Catholic"
http://www.traditio.com/tradlib/depauw67.txt

Lastly, I would mention:

The Truth about What Really Happened to the Catholic Church after Vatican II
by Bro. Michael Dimond & Bro. Peter Dimond

These two are obviously controversial and don't quite agree with any bishop or group consistently, and being sedevacantists, this is inevitable, but their book is quite good, it presents the truth in a unique way, it worth aquiring.
« Last Edit: April 07, 2014, 03:39:19 AM by Christopher McAvoy »
 

Offline Baldrick

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Re: Study Program on the Crisis
« Reply #13 on: July 14, 2015, 05:08:09 PM »
Tumultuous Times: The Twenty General Councils of the Catholic Church and Vatican II and Its Aftermath, Fr. Francisco Radecki & Fr. Dominic Radecki
 

Offline LausTibiChriste

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Re: Study Program on the Crisis
« Reply #14 on: July 14, 2015, 05:10:06 PM »
Tumultuous Times: The Twenty General Councils of the Catholic Church and Vatican II and Its Aftermath, Fr. Francisco Radecki & Fr. Dominic Radecki

How is that one?
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