Author Topic: YouTube You're watching  (Read 100921 times)

Offline red solo cup

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Re: YouTube You're watching
« Reply #1140 on: February 03, 2020, 04:37:53 PM »
"It's so lonely 'round the fields of Athenry"
 

Offline Prayerful

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Re: YouTube You're watching
« Reply #1141 on: February 03, 2020, 05:00:27 PM »

A rather interesting Danish barn find.
Padre Pio: Pray, hope, and don't worry. Worry is useless. God is merciful and will hear your prayer.
 

Offline TheReturnofLive

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Re: YouTube You're watching
« Reply #1142 on: February 04, 2020, 10:53:56 PM »

Tainted Love music video.

The 80s were an interesting time.

Only in the 80s could you have a skinny, feminine white man larping as a Roman emperor? with makeup, married to a woman wearing Victorian-era clothes, owning a black slave, with a mixed kid (implying an affair) who is fed to Pirahnnas, with nobody questioning it.
 

Offline Padraig

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Re: YouTube You're watching
« Reply #1143 on: February 05, 2020, 03:16:33 PM »

A Russian director I had never heard of, but whose works seem infinitely intriguing. Pon de Replay, I wonder if you've seen any of these?
 
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Offline Prayerful

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Re: YouTube You're watching
« Reply #1144 on: February 05, 2020, 06:45:49 PM »

Tainted Love music video.

The 80s were an interesting time.

Only in the 80s could you have a skinny, feminine white man larping as a Roman emperor? with makeup, married to a woman wearing Victorian-era clothes, owning a black slave, with a mixed kid (implying an affair) who is fed to Pirahnnas, with nobody questioning it.

An effeminate, heavily made up youth would represent rather a lot of Emperors.

Padre Pio: Pray, hope, and don't worry. Worry is useless. God is merciful and will hear your prayer.
 

Offline Pon de Replay

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Re: YouTube You're watching
« Reply #1145 on: February 05, 2020, 07:48:20 PM »
A Russian director I had never heard of, but whose works seem infinitely intriguing. Pon de Replay, I wonder if you've seen any of these?

Yes.  Tarkovsky made an unqualified masterpiece, Andrei Rublev.  His Solaris would have been a possible rival to 2001: A Space Odyssey but for a ponderous sequence that I still can't believe made it into the final cut.  I won't give away a spoiler, but if you watch it, you're certain to be scratching your head as you wonder 1. when the monotony will ever end and 2. how on earth someone of Tarkovsky's talent ever saw fit to put it in.  It is really one of the most glaring, amateurish, and terrible oddities of any movie I've ever seen.

I think my favorite Russian director, however, is Sergei Parajanov.
 
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Offline clau clau

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Re: YouTube You're watching
« Reply #1146 on: February 06, 2020, 02:13:50 AM »
Would you like to shake hands with Pope 1 or Pope 2 -
 me (inspired by Dr Seuss) see: https://seuss.fandom.com/wiki/Thing_One_and_Thing_Two

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Clau-Clau-Claudius shall speak clear.
 
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Offline red solo cup

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Re: YouTube You're watching
« Reply #1147 on: February 07, 2020, 12:11:58 PM »
On this date in history, Chet Huntley is not impressed.

"It's so lonely 'round the fields of Athenry"
 

Offline TheReturnofLive

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Re: YouTube You're watching
« Reply #1148 on: February 07, 2020, 04:11:35 PM »
A Russian director I had never heard of, but whose works seem infinitely intriguing. Pon de Replay, I wonder if you've seen any of these?

Yes.  Tarkovsky made an unqualified masterpiece, Andrei Rublev.  His Solaris would have been a possible rival to 2001: A Space Odyssey but for a ponderous sequence that I still can't believe made it into the final cut.  I won't give away a spoiler, but if you watch it, you're certain to be scratching your head as you wonder 1. when the monotony will ever end and 2. how on earth someone of Tarkovsky's talent ever saw fit to put it in.  It is really one of the most glaring, amateurish, and terrible oddities of any movie I've ever seen.

I've never seen Solaris except for the end sequence - I read the book. And for what it's worth, while movie and the book are two different beasts, the book Solaris is, at points, intentionally monotonous to ridicule how narcissistic science-fiction writers can be at flexing their knowledge of the physical sciences despite not being engineers or scientists themselves. Obviously not the same goal as the ending of Tarkovsky's film, but to some extent it fits the spirit of the book.

Here's a snippet:

"As soon as the question of comparisons with Earth arises, it must be understood that the ‘extensors’ are formations that dwarf the Grand Canyon, that they are produced in a substance which externally resembles a yeasty colloid (during this fantastic ‘fermentation,’ the yeast sets into festoons of starched open-work lace; some experts refer to ‘ossified tumors’), and that deeper down the substance becomes increasingly resistant, like a tensed muscle which fifty feet below the surface is as hard as rock but retains its flexibility. The ‘extensor’ appears to be an independent creation, stretching for miles between membranous walls swollen with ‘ossified growths,’ like some colossal python which after swallowing a mountain is sluggishly digesting the meal, while a slow shudder occasionally ripples along its creeping body. The ‘extensor’ only looks like a lethargic reptile from overhead. At close quarters, when the two ‘canyon walls’ loom hundreds of yards above the exploring aircraft, it can be seen that this inflated cylinder, reaching from one side of the horizon to the other, is bewilderingly alive with movement. First you notice the continual rotating motion of a greyish-green, oily sludge which reflects blinding sunlight, but skimming just above the ‘back of the python’ (the ‘ravine’ sheltering the ‘extensor’ now resembles the sides of a geological fault), you realize that the motion is in fact far more complex, and consists of concentric fluctuations traversed by darker currents. Occasionally this mantle turns into a shining crust that reflects sky and clouds and then is riddled by explosive eruptions of the internal gases and fluids. The observer slowly realizes that he is looking at the guiding forces that are thrusting outward and upward the two gradually crystallizing gelatinous walls. Science does not accept the obvious without further proof, however, and virulent controversies have reverberated down the years on the key question of the exact sequence of events in the interior of the ‘extensors that furrow the vast living ocean in their millions.
Various organic functions have been ascribed to the ‘extensors.’ Some experts have argued that their purpose is the transformation of matter; others suggested respiratory processes; still others claimed that they conveyed alimentary materials. An infinite variety of hypotheses now moulder in library basements, eliminated by ingenious, sometimes dangerous experiments. Today, the scientists will go no further than to refer to the ‘extensors’ as relatively simple, stable formations whose duration is measurable in weeks — an exceptional characteristic among the recorded phenomena of the planet.
The ‘mimoid’ formations are considerably more complex and bizarre, and elicit a more vehement response from the observer, an instinctive response, I mean. It can be stated without exaggeration that Giese fell in love with the ‘mimoids’ and was soon devoting all his time to them. For the rest of his life, he studied and described them and brought all his ingenuity to bear on defining their nature. The name he gave them indicates their most astonishing characteristic, the imitation of objects, near or far, external to the ocean itself.
Concealed at first beneath the ocean surface, a large flattened disc appears, ragged, with a tar-like coating. After a few hours, it begins to separate into flat sheets which rise slowly. The observer now becomes a spectator at what looks like a fight to the death, as massed ranks of waves converge from all directions like contorted, fleshy mouths which snap greedily around the tattered, fluttering leaf, then plunge into the depths. As each ring of waves breaks and sinks, the fall of this mass of hundreds of thousands of tons is accompanied for an instant by a viscous rumbling, an immense thunderclap. The tarry leaf is overwhelmed, battered and torn apart; with every fresh assault, circular fragments scatter and drift like feebly fluttering wings below the ocean surface. They bunch into pear-shaped clusters or long strings, merge and rise again, and drag with them an undertow of coagulated shreds of the base of the primal disc. The encircling waves continue to break around the steadily expanding crater. This phenomenon may persist for a day or linger on for a month, and sometimes there are no further developments. The conscientious Giese dubbed this first variation a ‘stillbirth,’ convinced that each of these upheavals aspired towards an ultimate condition, the ‘major mimoid,’ like a polyp colony (only covering an area greater than a town) of pale outcroppings with the faculty of imitating foreign bodies. Uyvens, on the other hand, saw this final stage as constituting a degeneration or necrosis: according to him, the appearance of the ‘copies’ corresponded to a localized dissipation of the life energies of the ocean, which was no longer in control of the original forms it created."
« Last Edit: February 07, 2020, 04:16:53 PM by TheReturnofLive »
 
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Offline Pon de Replay

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Re: YouTube You're watching
« Reply #1149 on: February 08, 2020, 07:39:25 AM »
I've never seen Solaris except for the end sequence - I read the book. And for what it's worth, while movie and the book are two different beasts, the book Solaris is, at points, intentionally monotonous to ridicule how narcissistic science-fiction writers can be at flexing their knowledge of the physical sciences despite not being engineers or scientists themselves. Obviously not the same goal as the ending of Tarkovsky's film, but to some extent it fits the spirit of the book.

Interesting.  I've never read the book.  You should watch the entire movie, though.  It's well worth seeing.  What makes its cinematic faux pas so exceptional is that it occurs in such an otherwise masterful and artistic film.  I would expect and almost forgive it in an amateurish movie, but not in Tarkovsky.
 
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Offline TheReturnofLive

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Re: YouTube You're watching
« Reply #1150 on: February 08, 2020, 11:06:31 AM »
I've never seen Solaris except for the end sequence - I read the book. And for what it's worth, while movie and the book are two different beasts, the book Solaris is, at points, intentionally monotonous to ridicule how narcissistic science-fiction writers can be at flexing their knowledge of the physical sciences despite not being engineers or scientists themselves. Obviously not the same goal as the ending of Tarkovsky's film, but to some extent it fits the spirit of the book.

Interesting.  I've never read the book.  You should watch the entire movie, though.  It's well worth seeing.  What makes its cinematic faux pas so exceptional is that it occurs in such an otherwise masterful and artistic film.  I would expect and almost forgive it in an amateurish movie, but not in Tarkovsky.

I absolutely loved "Ivan's Childhood," so I probably should.
 

Offline martin88nyc

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Re: YouTube You're watching
« Reply #1151 on: February 12, 2020, 11:05:10 PM »
"These things I have spoken to you, that in me you may have peace. In the world you shall have distress: but have confidence, I have overcome the world." John 16:33
 
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Offline clau clau

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Re: YouTube You're watching
« Reply #1152 on: February 17, 2020, 06:26:18 PM »
.
« Last Edit: February 17, 2020, 06:30:23 PM by clau clau »
Would you like to shake hands with Pope 1 or Pope 2 -
 me (inspired by Dr Seuss) see: https://seuss.fandom.com/wiki/Thing_One_and_Thing_Two

But when he's dumb and no more here,
Nineteen hundred years or near,
Clau-Clau-Claudius shall speak clear.
 
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Offline Fleur-de-Lys

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Re: YouTube You're watching
« Reply #1153 on: February 20, 2020, 10:58:20 AM »
Cat steals the show during classical music concert in Istanbul

 
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Offline red solo cup

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Re: YouTube You're watching
« Reply #1154 on: February 23, 2020, 06:32:08 AM »
"It's so lonely 'round the fields of Athenry"
 
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