Author Topic: Catholic Perspective on Bastille Day  (Read 293 times)

Offline Jayne

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Catholic Perspective on Bastille Day
« on: July 15, 2018, 10:26:42 AM »
It is a common atheist myth that religion is responsible for most wars and violence.  It is, however, easily shown that atheistic ideologies are evil and murderous.

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Solzhenitsyn Mourned Bastille Day. So Should All Christians.
By JOHN ZMIRAK Published on July 13, 2015

Tuesday, July 14 probably passes without much fanfare in your home, but the date, Bastille Day, marks the beginning of the greatest organized persecution of Christians since the Emperor Diocletian. This day, the beginning of the French Revolution, also planted the seeds for the murderous ideologies of socialism and nationalism that would poison the next two centuries, murdering millions of believers and other innocent civilians. Between them, those two political movements racked up quite a body count: In Death By Government, scholar R. J. Rummel pointed out that during the first 88 years of this century, almost 170,000,000 men, women and children have been shot, beaten, tortured, knifed, burned, starved, frozen, crushed, or worked to death; or buried alive, drowned, hung, bombed, or killed in any other of the myriad ways governments have inflicted death on unarmed, helpless citizens or foreigners.

But the first such modern genocide in the West took place in France, beginning in 1793. It was undertaken by modern, progressive apostles of Enlightenment and aimed at pious peasants in the Vendée region of France. By its end up to 300,000 civilians had been killed by the armies of the Republic.

This story is little discussed in France. Indeed, a devout historian who teaches at a French university once told me, “We are not to mention the Vendée. Anyone who brings up what was done there has no prospect of an academic career. So we keep silent.”

It is mostly in the Vendée itself that memories linger, which may explain why that part of France to this day remains more religious and more conservative than any other region. The local government opened a museum marking these atrocities on their 200th anniversary in 1993 — with a visit by Alexander Solzhenitsyn, who noted during his eloquent address that the mass murders of Christians in Russia were directly inspired by those in the Vendée. The Bolsheviks, he said, modeled themselves on the French revolutionaries, and Lenin himself pointed to the Vendée massacres as the right way to deal with Christian resistance.

It was ordinary farmers of the Vendée and Brittany regions who rose up in 1793 against the middle-class radicals in Paris who controlled the country. The ideologues of the Revolution had already executed the king and queen, and left their young son to die of disease in prison.

Seized the Cathedral of Notre Dame, stripped it of Christian symbols, and enshrined a prostitute as the “Goddess of Reason” on the altar;
Declared a revolutionary “war of liberation” against most of the other countries in Europe;

Suspended all Protestant services, in deference to the state’s cult of Reason;
Seized all church property from Catholics, expelling thousands of monks, priests and nuns to fend for themselves, then sold the property to their cronies to raise money for their wars;

Ordered all clergy to swear allegiance to the government instead of the church; and
Launched the first universal conscription in history, drafting ordinary people — most of them devout peasants bewildered by the slogans that held sway in Paris—to fight for the Revolution.

When the Parisians came to take away their sons for the army, the Vendeans finally fought back and launched a counter-revolution in the name of “God and King.” It quickly spread across the northwest of France, tying down the government’s professional armies — fighting untrained bands of devout guerillas, many of them armed only with muskets suited to hunting.

The First Modern Genocide
As Sophie Masson — herself a descendant of rebels who fought in the Vendée resistance — has written:

The atrocities multiplied, the exterminations systematic and initiated from the very top, and carried out with glee at the bottom. At least 300,000 people were massacred during that time, and those of the intruders who refused to do the job were either shot or discredited utterly. But still the people resisted. Still there were those who hid in the forests and ambushed, who fought as bravely as lions but were butchered like pigs when they were caught. No quarter was given; all the leaders were shot, beheaded or hanged. Many were not even allowed to rest in peace; the body of the last leader was cut up and distributed to scientists; his head was pickled in a jar, the brain examined to see where the seed of rebellion lay in the mind of a savage.…

“Not one is to be left alive.” “Women are reproductive furrows who must be ploughed under.” “Only wolves must be left to roam that land.” “Fire, blood, death are needed to preserve liberty.” “Their instruments of fanaticism and superstition must be smashed.” These were some of the words the Convention used in speaking of the Vendée. Their tame scientists dreamed up all kinds of new ideas – the poisoning of flour and alcohol and water supplies, the setting up of a tannery in Angers which would specialise in the treatment of human skins; the investigation of methods of burning large numbers of people in large ovens so their fat could be rendered down efficiently. One of the Republican generals, Carrier, was scornful of such research: these “modern” methods would take too long. Better to use more time-honoured methods of massacre: the mass drownings of naked men, women and children, often tied together in what he called “republican marriages,” off specially constructed boats towed out to the middle of the Loire and then sunk; the mass bayoneting of men, women and children; the smashing of babies’ heads against walls; the slaughter of prisoners using cannons; the most grisly and disgusting tortures; the burning and pillaging of villages, towns and churches.

The persecution only really ended when Napoleon came to power in 1799 — and needed peace at home so that he could launch his wars of conquest. He patched together a modus vivendi with the pope, and the Vendée quieted down.
 

see more at https://stream.org/solzhenitsyn-mourned-bastille-day/
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Offline Chestertonian

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Re: Catholic Perspective on Bastille Day
« Reply #1 on: July 15, 2018, 11:14:07 AM »
the New York purgatorial society has historically held a beautifulrequiem mass for king louis on bastille day

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Offline mikemac

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Re: Catholic Perspective on Bastille Day
« Reply #2 on: July 15, 2018, 05:42:10 PM »
I don't think Bastille Day is celebrated in Quebec, is it?
Like John Vennari (RIP) said "Why not just do it?  What would it hurt?"
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Offline mikemac

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Re: Catholic Perspective on Bastille Day
« Reply #3 on: July 16, 2018, 10:57:40 AM »
Bastille Day? - Quebec City Forum
https://www.tripadvisor.ca/ShowTopic-g155033-i134-k695738-Bastille_Day-Quebec_City_Quebec.html
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I made reservations at one of the finest hotels in QC for next week, arriving on July 14. I asked whether there are any celebrations of Bastille Day. To which the woman replied: "What is Bastille Day?"

Yikes. And these people call themselves francophiles????

Ken

Meanwhile in Louisiana

Celebrate Bastille Day 2017 in Louisiana
https://nouvelleorleans.consulfrance.org/Celebrate-Bastille-Day-2017-in
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French Mass at the Holy Name of Jesus Church
Followed by lunch at Commander’s Palace

Holy Name of Jesus Church is celebrating Bastille Day with a Mass on Sunday, July 09 This Mass celebrates New Orleans’ and Louisiana’s French Heritage, bilingual Mass booklets “en Français” and in English will be provided.
Those would like to attend the lunch should contact Louis Koerner’s office at (504) 581-9569.
Like John Vennari (RIP) said "Why not just do it?  What would it hurt?"
Consecrate Russia to the Immaculate Heart of Mary (PETITION)
https://lifepetitions.com/petition/consecrate-russia-to-the-immaculate-heart-of-mary-petition

"We would be mistaken to think that Fatima’s prophetic mission is complete." Benedict XVI May 13, 2010

"Tell people that God gives graces through the Immaculate Heart of Mary.  Tell them also to pray to the Immaculate Heart of Mary for peace, since God has entrusted it to Her." Saint Jacinta Marto

The real nature of hope is “despair, overcome.”
Source
 
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Offline Kaesekopf

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Re: Catholic Perspective on Bastille Day
« Reply #4 on: July 16, 2018, 06:21:07 PM »
The bastille days festival in Milwaukee is mostly that of French new Orleans, lol

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