Author Topic: "The Antiliturgical Heresy"  (Read 3125 times)

Offline Jayne

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"The Antiliturgical Heresy"
« on: August 14, 2015, 07:01:54 PM »
I came across this article: http://liturgyguy.com/2015/08/10/the-antiliturgical-heresy/

Here is an excerpt:
Quote
In his contemporary classic, “The Organic Development of the Liturgy”, Dom Alcuin Reid, O.S.B. discusses the twelve characteristics of what Guéranger called the antiliturgical heresy. Guéranger’s list today reads like a litany of the supposed liturgical reforms of the post-conciliar years. Alcuin lists the twelve as follows:

The first is the hatred of Tradition in the formulas of divine worship.

The second is the substitution of writings from Sacred Scripture for formulas composed by the Church.

The fabrication and introduction of new liturgical formulas is the third.

Fourth is the contradictory principle that operates from an affection for antiquity that seeks to “reproduce divine worship in its original purity” while spurning development later in liturgical Tradition and yet introducing new elements of “incontestably human” origin.

Fifth, noting that similar attitudes are to be seen in Protestant liturgical reform, Guéranger proscribes the rationalistic removal of ceremonies and formulas that leads to a loss of the supernatural or mystical element of the Liturgy without regard for its tangible and poetic nature.

One can read the rest at the link.  One can see from this much just how problematic the liturgical changes of recent decades have been.
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Offline VeraeFidei

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Re: "The Antiliturgical Heresy"
« Reply #1 on: August 14, 2015, 07:54:43 PM »
I came across this article: http://liturgyguy.com/2015/08/10/the-antiliturgical-heresy/

Here is an excerpt:
Quote
In his contemporary classic, “The Organic Development of the Liturgy”, Dom Alcuin Reid, O.S.B. discusses the twelve characteristics of what Guéranger called the antiliturgical heresy. Guéranger’s list today reads like a litany of the supposed liturgical reforms of the post-conciliar years. Alcuin lists the twelve as follows:

The first is the hatred of Tradition in the formulas of divine worship.

The second is the substitution of writings from Sacred Scripture for formulas composed by the Church.

The fabrication and introduction of new liturgical formulas is the third.

Fourth is the contradictory principle that operates from an affection for antiquity that seeks to “reproduce divine worship in its original purity” while spurning development later in liturgical Tradition and yet introducing new elements of “incontestably human” origin.

Fifth, noting that similar attitudes are to be seen in Protestant liturgical reform, Guéranger proscribes the rationalistic removal of ceremonies and formulas that leads to a loss of the supernatural or mystical element of the Liturgy without regard for its tangible and poetic nature.

One can read the rest at the link.  One can see from this much just how problematic the liturgical changes of recent decades have been.
Yup. Nearly anyone who goes to a "Traditional Latin Mass" tomorrow for the Feast of the Assumption will be participating in the anti-liturgical heresy by assisting at Pius XII's deformed Assumption Mass, the banal Signum Magnum Mass, rather than the Assumption Mass of Latin Catholic Tradition, in use from time immemorial until 1950. So much for Tradition!
 

Offline Prayerful

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Re: "The Antiliturgical Heresy"
« Reply #2 on: August 14, 2015, 08:23:59 PM »
Fr Bugini attained his liturgical appointment two years earlier, so I'd suspect he had a hand in that.
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Offline VeraeFidei

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Re: "The Antiliturgical Heresy"
« Reply #3 on: August 14, 2015, 10:41:29 PM »
Fr Bugini attained his liturgical appointment two years earlier, so I'd suspect he had a hand in that.
Yes, but far more importantly, signed, sealed, and delivered by Pius XII.
 

Offline Maximilian

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Re: "The Antiliturgical Heresy"
« Reply #4 on: August 15, 2015, 12:01:45 AM »

Nearly anyone who goes to a "Traditional Latin Mass" tomorrow for the Feast of the Assumption will be participating in the anti-liturgical heresy by assisting at Pius XII's deformed Assumption Mass, the banal Signum Magnum Mass, rather than the Assumption Mass of Latin Catholic Tradition, in use from time immemorial until 1950. So much for Tradition!

I've never heard of this before.
Can you tell us more what you mean?
 

Offline VeraeFidei

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Re: "The Antiliturgical Heresy"
« Reply #5 on: August 15, 2015, 05:52:50 AM »

Nearly anyone who goes to a "Traditional Latin Mass" tomorrow for the Feast of the Assumption will be participating in the anti-liturgical heresy by assisting at Pius XII's deformed Assumption Mass, the banal Signum Magnum Mass, rather than the Assumption Mass of Latin Catholic Tradition, in use from time immemorial until 1950. So much for Tradition!

I've never heard of this before.
Can you tell us more what you mean?
Sure! Do you have the Dom Gueranger Liturgical Year series? Or a Saint Andrews missal?

If you do, have a look at the Mass texts for the Assumption. Then, pull out your 1962 Missal (or go here: http://maternalheart.org/propers/Propers%20of%20the%20Saints/Aug%2015%20-%20Assumption/Assumption.pdf) to see what the Mass is now. After Pius XII proclaimed the Assumption as dogma, he authorized a nearly wholesale re-do of the Mass.

(Gaudeamus is the first word of the introit of the Traditional Mass; Signum Magnum that of the new Mass)

The Saint Lawrence Press blog (www.ordorecitandi.blogspot.com) has an informative write up about this too. To wit:

Quote
The 'liturgical books of 1962' have seen considerable revision of the once beautiful feast with changes both in 1960 and, previously, with the introduction of novel texts in the 1950s. Vespers gets a new chapter, hymn and collect. The new collect was once admirably described by the erudite Latin scholar Rev. John Hunwicke as "a modern composition which I would describe as a dollop of dogma followed by a platitude". At Mattins in the first nocturn the first lesson is taken from Genesis and then, curiously, the second and third from the former Epistle of St. Paul to the Corinthians. In the second nocturn the magnificent writings of St. Damascene are shortened by the inclusion of a sixth lesson from Pacelli's verbiage. The third nocturn has a homily of St. Peter Canisus on the new gospel pericope introduced in 1950. At Lauds there is a new chapter, a pedestrian and ugly hymn replacing O gloriosa virginum, and the new collect. At Prime the lectio brevis is Dominus autem dirigat, of the season. At Prime and the Hours the tone of the hymns is that for greater feasts, not the Incarnation and the special Doxology is omitted. The 1950's creation is banal and ugly compared with the ancient texts. At Vespers there is no commemoration of St. Joachim. The Octave was abolished in 1955 and so, within the space of five years, over a millenium's veritable tradition, organic development and beauty was simply tossed aside in the name of 'living tradition'.
 
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Offline Maximilian

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Re: "The Antiliturgical Heresy"
« Reply #6 on: August 15, 2015, 12:15:12 PM »

Nearly anyone who goes to a "Traditional Latin Mass" tomorrow for the Feast of the Assumption will be participating in the anti-liturgical heresy by assisting at Pius XII's deformed Assumption Mass, the banal Signum Magnum Mass, rather than the Assumption Mass of Latin Catholic Tradition, in use from time immemorial until 1950. So much for Tradition!

I've never heard of this before.
Can you tell us more what you mean?
Sure! Do you have the Dom Gueranger Liturgical Year series? Or a Saint Andrews missal?

If you do, have a look at the Mass texts for the Assumption. Then, pull out your 1962 Missal (or go here: http://maternalheart.org/propers/Propers%20of%20the%20Saints/Aug%2015%20-%20Assumption/Assumption.pdf) to see what the Mass is now. After Pius XII proclaimed the Assumption as dogma, he authorized a nearly wholesale re-do of the Mass.

(Gaudeamus is the first word of the introit of the Traditional Mass; Signum Magnum that of the new Mass)

The Saint Lawrence Press blog (www.ordorecitandi.blogspot.com) has an informative write up about this too. To wit:

Quote
The 'liturgical books of 1962' have seen considerable revision of the once beautiful feast with changes both in 1960 and, previously, with the introduction of novel texts in the 1950s. Vespers gets a new chapter, hymn and collect. The new collect was once admirably described by the erudite Latin scholar Rev. John Hunwicke as "a modern composition which I would describe as a dollop of dogma followed by a platitude". At Mattins in the first nocturn the first lesson is taken from Genesis and then, curiously, the second and third from the former Epistle of St. Paul to the Corinthians. In the second nocturn the magnificent writings of St. Damascene are shortened by the inclusion of a sixth lesson from Pacelli's verbiage. The third nocturn has a homily of St. Peter Canisus on the new gospel pericope introduced in 1950. At Lauds there is a new chapter, a pedestrian and ugly hymn replacing O gloriosa virginum, and the new collect. At Prime the lectio brevis is Dominus autem dirigat, of the season. At Prime and the Hours the tone of the hymns is that for greater feasts, not the Incarnation and the special Doxology is omitted. The 1950's creation is banal and ugly compared with the ancient texts. At Vespers there is no commemoration of St. Joachim. The Octave was abolished in 1955 and so, within the space of five years, over a millenium's veritable tradition, organic development and beauty was simply tossed aside in the name of 'living tradition'.

Very interesting. Thanks for posting this.
Only 5 years after the proclamation of the dogma, the feast lost it's status as a privileged octave.
 

Offline Jayne

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Re: "The Antiliturgical Heresy"
« Reply #7 on: August 15, 2015, 12:41:22 PM »
I went to Mass today at an SSPX chapel using the 1962 Missal.  I found it beautiful and inspiring. I am thankful that I was able to attend. I am glad that I did not know enough to be distracted by criticisms of the liturgy.
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Offline VeraeFidei

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Re: "The Antiliturgical Heresy"
« Reply #8 on: August 15, 2015, 01:32:55 PM »
I went to Mass today at an SSPX chapel using the 1962 Missal.  I found it beautiful and inspiring. I am thankful that I was able to attend. I am glad that I did not know enough to be distracted by criticisms of the liturgy.
 

Offline VeraeFidei

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Re: "The Antiliturgical Heresy"
« Reply #9 on: August 15, 2015, 01:34:41 PM »

Nearly anyone who goes to a "Traditional Latin Mass" tomorrow for the Feast of the Assumption will be participating in the anti-liturgical heresy by assisting at Pius XII's deformed Assumption Mass, the banal Signum Magnum Mass, rather than the Assumption Mass of Latin Catholic Tradition, in use from time immemorial until 1950. So much for Tradition!

I've never heard of this before.
Can you tell us more what you mean?
Sure! Do you have the Dom Gueranger Liturgical Year series? Or a Saint Andrews missal?

If you do, have a look at the Mass texts for the Assumption. Then, pull out your 1962 Missal (or go here: http://maternalheart.org/propers/Propers%20of%20the%20Saints/Aug%2015%20-%20Assumption/Assumption.pdf) to see what the Mass is now. After Pius XII proclaimed the Assumption as dogma, he authorized a nearly wholesale re-do of the Mass.

(Gaudeamus is the first word of the introit of the Traditional Mass; Signum Magnum that of the new Mass)

The Saint Lawrence Press blog (www.ordorecitandi.blogspot.com) has an informative write up about this too. To wit:

Quote
The 'liturgical books of 1962' have seen considerable revision of the once beautiful feast with changes both in 1960 and, previously, with the introduction of novel texts in the 1950s. Vespers gets a new chapter, hymn and collect. The new collect was once admirably described by the erudite Latin scholar Rev. John Hunwicke as "a modern composition which I would describe as a dollop of dogma followed by a platitude". At Mattins in the first nocturn the first lesson is taken from Genesis and then, curiously, the second and third from the former Epistle of St. Paul to the Corinthians. In the second nocturn the magnificent writings of St. Damascene are shortened by the inclusion of a sixth lesson from Pacelli's verbiage. The third nocturn has a homily of St. Peter Canisus on the new gospel pericope introduced in 1950. At Lauds there is a new chapter, a pedestrian and ugly hymn replacing O gloriosa virginum, and the new collect. At Prime the lectio brevis is Dominus autem dirigat, of the season. At Prime and the Hours the tone of the hymns is that for greater feasts, not the Incarnation and the special Doxology is omitted. The 1950's creation is banal and ugly compared with the ancient texts. At Vespers there is no commemoration of St. Joachim. The Octave was abolished in 1955 and so, within the space of five years, over a millenium's veritable tradition, organic development and beauty was simply tossed aside in the name of 'living tradition'.

Very interesting. Thanks for posting this.
Only 5 years after the proclamation of the dogma, the feast lost it's status as a privileged octave.
:toth:

Indeed, it did. More of the antiliturgical heresy. Although apparently we are better off being blissfully ignorant of this after all ;)
 

Offline Maximilian

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Re: "The Antiliturgical Heresy"
« Reply #10 on: August 15, 2015, 03:02:26 PM »

I went to Mass today at an SSPX chapel using the 1962 Missal.  I found it beautiful and inspiring. I am thankful that I was able to attend. I am glad that I did not know enough to be distracted by criticisms of the liturgy.


Yes, it's true that there is a time for everything. Sometimes it is difficult to keep them from overlapping and interfering with each other.

Just like there is a time for making out my shopping list. But during the consecration of the Mass is not the right time to be thinking about it. In order to get the spiritual benefit of the Mass we have to shut out distracting thoughts even if they are legitimate in another context.

In the same way, thoughts about the revolution in the Church have their place, but that place is not the time when we should be trying to enter into the spirit of the mystical union that is happening on the altar. Then is the time to shut out all thoughts about sedevacantism, liturgical changes, etc.

Even if we had made the wrong decision and are in the wrong place, it's too late now, here we are, let's just get what we can out of the place where we find ourselves. I visit a lot of different chapels when I am travelling, and they don't always turn out to be what I expected, but each of them can be edifying in its own way.

Last summer, for example, I was in Florida for a week, and I managed to visit an independent sedevacantist chapel, the local SSPX chapel, and Bishop Sanborn's seminary. Each of them in their own way had something wonderful to offer. And once I was in the one venue or another, there was no point in wishing I was somewhere else.

Then there are other times when we are not at Mass when it is okay and even incumbent upon us to think about things like the liturgical revolution. and the changes it has wrought. Keeping those various things in their proper boxes can be very challenging.
 
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Offline Kaesekopf

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Re: "The Antiliturgical Heresy"
« Reply #11 on: August 18, 2015, 03:32:05 PM »
Very interesting. Thanks for posting this.
Only 5 years after the proclamation of the dogma, the feast lost it's status as a privileged octave.

Mind-boggling, I think.

Why suppress the octave AFTER the dogma... if anything...  it should have been enhanced!
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Offline Maximilian

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Re: "The Antiliturgical Heresy"
« Reply #12 on: August 18, 2015, 03:51:59 PM »
Very interesting. Thanks for posting this.
Only 5 years after the proclamation of the dogma, the feast lost it's status as a privileged octave.

Mind-boggling, I think.

Why suppress the octave AFTER the dogma... if anything...  it should have been enhanced!

Because ALL of the octaves were suppressed.

When a tsunami comes, it washes away everything, the good as well as the bad, the new as well as the old. Decisions made just a few years prior were annihilated by the liturgical revolution just as much as parts of the Mass that went back to St. Gregory the Great.