Suscipe Domine Traditional Catholic Forum

The Parish Hall => Family Life => Topic started by: Padraig on March 23, 2019, 03:00:46 PM

Title: Does anyone here mill their own flour/other grain at home?
Post by: Padraig on March 23, 2019, 03:00:46 PM
Bread baking has been a passionate hobby of mine for almost a decade, but within the last couple years I've become concerned that flour is just not flour anymore, even brands that claim to be 100% stone ground. To avoid the problems with commercial whole wheat, I've been interested in grinding my own flour for homemade sourdough bread, but there are two main problems I've run into: 1) wheat berries are twice as expensive as even the best flours (average is about $2/lb); and 2) countertop mills are really expensive, even hand-cranked ones (about $200 for one that actually works). Since you aren't saving money by buying the wheat berries instead of flour, you never recoup the cost of the grinder.

So I was wondering if anyone here has any experience in this area. It seemed like the sort of thing that might appeal to this crowd ;) If so, where did you get your grinder, and where do you buy your wheat berries? How much would you estimate you spend in a year on wheat?
Title: Re: Does anyone here mill their own flour/other grain at home?
Post by: Maximilian on March 23, 2019, 03:17:03 PM
The Haydens used to do this. I wonder if it's possible to contact any of them? Although only the older ones would remember.
Title: Re: Does anyone here mill their own flour/other grain at home?
Post by: Heinrich on March 23, 2019, 04:08:49 PM
Thank you for giving me an idea of something Mrs. Heinrich and I can do together. I was thinking of enrolling in a pottery class as a surprise, but now I might get a mill and grain to grind and bake.

I would not let the (erroneous) pecuniary pursuit of a hobby be a hindrance to actually doing it. I have dogs and cold blooded critters, a garage gym, and guns. They all cost money and net me zero lettuce, but honest enjoyment. If you wanna a bake a da bread, buy da stuff.
Title: Re: Does anyone here mill their own flour/other grain at home?
Post by: Traditionallyruralmom on March 23, 2019, 04:13:32 PM
I have a wonder mill, and I love it.  It was worth every penny.  It grinds beautiful, fine flour. It even grinds corn!  Fresh cornmeal is such a luxury!  No bitter taste.  The best meatless Friday corn pone you will ever taste is with fresh ground cornmeal!!  And the same for wheat flour, store bought wheat flour gets bitter so quickly.  I hated anything wheat forever because I associated a bitter taste with it.  Not anymore since I grind my own flour.  I had a kitchen aid grinder attachment, and it made a very course flour, not at all nice. Good for cracked hot cereal mixes.  But it was all I had for years, and I made the best of it. This fall, I bought some local grown Einkorn wheat, and I will get spelt as well.  Again, for so many reasons, it is worth the $2 a pound.  I believe in spending money on good quality, wholesome, whole foods.  We are going on 9 children, and I won't skimp on quality, whole ingredients, even though we are not well off.
I will order my spelt by the 50# bag from our local Co-op or get Great River Mills from Amazon.  I use food safe buckets from Menards and gamma lids to store it.  Hard to say how much I spend...
Title: Re: Does anyone here mill their own flour/other grain at home?
Post by: Lynne on March 23, 2019, 04:44:58 PM
I have a wonder mill, and I love it.  It was worth every penny.  It grinds beautiful, fine flour. It even grinds corn!  Fresh cornmeal is such a luxury!  No bitter taste.  The best meatless Friday corn pone you will ever taste is with fresh ground cornmeal!!  And the same for wheat flour, store bought wheat flour gets bitter so quickly.  I hated anything wheat forever because I associated a bitter taste with it.  Not anymore since I grind my own flour.  I had a kitchen aid grinder attachment, and it made a very course flour, not at all nice. Good for cracked hot cereal mixes.  But it was all I had for years, and I made the best of it. This fall, I bought some local grown Einkorn wheat, and I will get spelt as well.  Again, for so many reasons, it is worth the $2 a pound.  I believe in spending money on good quality, wholesome, whole foods.  We are going on 9 children, and I won't skimp on quality, whole ingredients, even though we are not well off.
I will order my spelt by the 50# bag from our local Co-op or get Great River Mills from Amazon.  I use food safe buckets from Menards and gamma lids to store it.  Hard to say how much I spend...

Local Einkorn?! The only place I knew to get it was from https://jovialfoods.com/ (https://jovialfoods.com/).
Title: Re: Does anyone here mill their own flour/other grain at home?
Post by: Traditionallyruralmom on March 23, 2019, 04:50:06 PM
I have a wonder mill, and I love it.  It was worth every penny.  It grinds beautiful, fine flour. It even grinds corn!  Fresh cornmeal is such a luxury!  No bitter taste.  The best meatless Friday corn pone you will ever taste is with fresh ground cornmeal!!  And the same for wheat flour, store bought wheat flour gets bitter so quickly.  I hated anything wheat forever because I associated a bitter taste with it.  Not anymore since I grind my own flour.  I had a kitchen aid grinder attachment, and it made a very course flour, not at all nice. Good for cracked hot cereal mixes.  But it was all I had for years, and I made the best of it. This fall, I bought some local grown Einkorn wheat, and I will get spelt as well.  Again, for so many reasons, it is worth the $2 a pound.  I believe in spending money on good quality, wholesome, whole foods.  We are going on 9 children, and I won't skimp on quality, whole ingredients, even though we are not well off.
I will order my spelt by the 50# bag from our local Co-op or get Great River Mills from Amazon.  I use food safe buckets from Menards and gamma lids to store it.  Hard to say how much I spend...

Local Einkorn?! The only place I knew to get it was from https://jovialfoods.com/ (https://jovialfoods.com/).

I got the 2 of the 50% bag of berries.  I was hoping to use them to sprout and then grind into flour, but many of the grans are broken, probably 30%, so it is unsproutable.  Iwas a bit disappointed, but the flavor is excellent, so it all worked out.  I store them in one of my freezers to keep fresh. I bought some spelt from Great River to sprout and then grind.
 https://meuerfarm.com/index.html
Title: Re: Does anyone here mill their own flour/other grain at home?
Post by: Padraig on March 23, 2019, 06:37:39 PM
I have a wonder mill, and I love it.  It was worth every penny.  It grinds beautiful, fine flour. It even grinds corn!  Fresh cornmeal is such a luxury!  No bitter taste.  The best meatless Friday corn pone you will ever taste is with fresh ground cornmeal!!  And the same for wheat flour, store bought wheat flour gets bitter so quickly.  I hated anything wheat forever because I associated a bitter taste with it.  Not anymore since I grind my own flour.  I had a kitchen aid grinder attachment, and it made a very course flour, not at all nice. Good for cracked hot cereal mixes.  But it was all I had for years, and I made the best of it. This fall, I bought some local grown Einkorn wheat, and I will get spelt as well.  Again, for so many reasons, it is worth the $2 a pound.  I believe in spending money on good quality, wholesome, whole foods.  We are going on 9 children, and I won't skimp on quality, whole ingredients, even though we are not well off.
I will order my spelt by the 50# bag from our local Co-op or get Great River Mills from Amazon.  I use food safe buckets from Menards and gamma lids to store it.  Hard to say how much I spend...

I'll keep looking into the WonderMill. I saw the hand cranked one (popular with preppers) which was able to handle not just wheat, but also make peanut butter, crack barley for making beer, and grinding flax seeds. I've watched people using it on YouTube videos, though, and it's really slow. Unfortunately the electric one can't handle all of these things. I'm glad to know someone is successfully using it, and really loves it, though! I'll do some more thinking about whether it'll be worth it right now.
Title: Re: Does anyone here mill their own flour/other grain at home?
Post by: Padraig on March 23, 2019, 06:39:59 PM
Thank you for giving me an idea of something Mrs. Heinrich and I can do together. I was thinking of enrolling in a pottery class as a surprise, but now I might get a mill and grain to grind and bake.

I would not let the (erroneous) pecuniary pursuit of a hobby be a hindrance to actually doing it. I have dogs and cold blooded critters, a garage gym, and guns. They all cost money and net me zero lettuce, but honest enjoyment. If you wanna a bake a da bread, buy da stuff.

If I had more disposable income, I would definitely invest more into this hobby. I'll just have to justify it to myself as more of a lifelong investment than a simple hobby expense...
Title: Re: Does anyone here mill their own flour/other grain at home?
Post by: Traditionallyruralmom on March 23, 2019, 07:36:32 PM
I have a wonder mill, and I love it.  It was worth every penny.  It grinds beautiful, fine flour. It even grinds corn!  Fresh cornmeal is such a luxury!  No bitter taste.  The best meatless Friday corn pone you will ever taste is with fresh ground cornmeal!!  And the same for wheat flour, store bought wheat flour gets bitter so quickly.  I hated anything wheat forever because I associated a bitter taste with it.  Not anymore since I grind my own flour.  I had a kitchen aid grinder attachment, and it made a very course flour, not at all nice. Good for cracked hot cereal mixes.  But it was all I had for years, and I made the best of it. This fall, I bought some local grown Einkorn wheat, and I will get spelt as well.  Again, for so many reasons, it is worth the $2 a pound.  I believe in spending money on good quality, wholesome, whole foods.  We are going on 9 children, and I won't skimp on quality, whole ingredients, even though we are not well off.
I will order my spelt by the 50# bag from our local Co-op or get Great River Mills from Amazon.  I use food safe buckets from Menards and gamma lids to store it.  Hard to say how much I spend...

I'll keep looking into the WonderMill. I saw the hand cranked one (popular with preppers) which was able to handle not just wheat, but also make peanut butter, crack barley for making beer, and grinding flax seeds. I've watched people using it on YouTube videos, though, and it's really slow. Unfortunately the electric one can't handle all of these things. I'm glad to know someone is successfully using it, and really loves it, though! I'll do some more thinking about whether it'll be worth it right now.

I am no prepper at this point in my life, more of a survive the day-er... but I do have lots of bulk food and freezers full of meat.  About 20 years ago, we had the prepper mindset, and I had dreams of this one
https://www.lehmans.com/product/diamant-grain-mill
but I am more practical now, and realize if the crap is gonna hit the fan, I'm going to be pretty schnuckered, and depending on the wisdom of my Amish neighbors ;)
Title: Re: Does anyone here mill their own flour/other grain at home?
Post by: Maximilian on March 23, 2019, 08:31:37 PM

I'll just have to justify it to myself as more of a lifelong investment than a simple hobby expense...

The intellect serves its purpose by inventing plausible justifications for the things desired by the heart.
Title: Re: Does anyone here mill their own flour/other grain at home?
Post by: Maximilian on March 23, 2019, 08:49:45 PM
Title: Re: Does anyone here mill their own flour/other grain at home?
Post by: Maximilian on March 23, 2019, 09:53:55 PM

Title: Re: Does anyone here mill their own flour/other grain at home?
Post by: Maximilian on March 23, 2019, 10:07:43 PM

Title: Re: Does anyone here mill their own flour/other grain at home?
Post by: Maximilian on March 23, 2019, 10:24:15 PM

Title: Re: Does anyone here mill their own flour/other grain at home?
Post by: Chestertonian on March 23, 2019, 11:10:28 PM
that's interesting..
we just found out my 2.5 year old son has a wheat and nut allergy but what's interesting is that he can have barley and spelt so my mom has used those.  My wife and kids don't eat much in the way of carbs but it sounds like a good option for ensuring that it doesn't come into contact with wheat
Title: Re: Does anyone here mill their own flour/other grain at home?
Post by: Padraig on March 23, 2019, 11:43:28 PM
So, essentially all these mills are amazing and I should just buy one...

The demonstration of the Wondermill Junior was honestly really impressive. Considerably faster than it had seemed from other videos (like the third video you posted).

Now it's just a question of hand-cranking or electric motor...
Title: Re: Does anyone here mill their own flour/other grain at home?
Post by: Maximilian on March 24, 2019, 12:19:19 AM

The demonstration of the Wondermill Junior was honestly really impressive. Considerably faster than it had seemed from other videos (like the third video you posted).

I'm not sure if it's accurate to call the Wondermill "faster."


P.S. Obviously Mormon.
P.P.S. Mormons have the best prices on wheat berries. See link in video. But they're not necessarily Roundup-free.
Title: Re: Does anyone here mill their own flour/other grain at home?
Post by: Padraig on March 24, 2019, 09:49:03 AM
Hahahahaha, I saw that video while doing my research. It's funny how Mormons have something I couldn't even describe, but readily identifies them.
Their wheat is the best price, and the only one that gets under $1/lb. But I do doubt the "cleanliness" of the growing. Apparently it's common practice to spray the crop with one more huge hit of Roundup right before harvesting.
I found a family farm in Colorado with six little kids who have organic wheat (not yet certified, but non-GMO and organic practices in their farming) for about $1.20/lb.
Title: Re: Does anyone here mill their own flour/other grain at home?
Post by: Traditionallyruralmom on March 24, 2019, 09:37:54 PM

Their wheat is the best price, and the only one that gets under $1/lb. But I do doubt the "cleanliness" of the growing. Apparently it's common practice to spray the crop with one more huge hit of Roundup right before harvesting.


My holistic MD shared an article with me that links the chemical in Roundup with the massive gluten intolerance levels we are seeing today.  It messes up your digestive system on a cellular level, if I remember correctly.  If you are interested, I can ask him to resend me the study.  That is why I try to buy all my wheat and sugar organic, since they are 2 that are hit heavily with roundup.   
Title: Re: Does anyone here mill their own flour/other grain at home?
Post by: Maximilian on March 24, 2019, 09:53:53 PM

Their wheat is the best price, and the only one that gets under $1/lb. But I do doubt the "cleanliness" of the growing. Apparently it's common practice to spray the crop with one more huge hit of Roundup right before harvesting.


My holistic MD shared an article with me that links the chemical in Roundup with the massive gluten intolerance levels we are seeing today.  It messes up your digestive system on a cellular level, if I remember correctly.  If you are interested, I can ask him to resend me the study. 

Yes, that's glyphosate.

https://truthout.org/articles/glyphosate-herbicides-are-altering-the-food-chain/

Glyphosate Herbicides Are Altering the Food Chain

As the active ingredient in Bayer’s Roundup herbicide is increasingly scrutinized for human health impacts, scientists say it also could be altering the wildlife and organisms at the base of the food chain.

Glyphosate is one of the most widely used herbicides in history. Farmers in 2014 sprayed enough of the chemical to cover every acre of cropland in the entire world with nearly a half-pound of the herbicide, according to a 2016 study published in Environmental Sciences Europe.

Long thought to be relatively benign to non-target plants and animals, evidence is growing that glyphosate, the active ingredient of Roundup, may impact the metabolism, growth and reproduction of aquatic creatures and could be altering the essential gut bacteria of animals such as bees.

Such impacts could have serious unexpected impacts on the tiny critters that form the base of the animal food chain, say environmental researchers, who warn the ecological impacts are likely to grow as glyphosate levels build up in the environment.

“No herbicide in the history of the world has ever been used this heavily. It’s a completely unprecedented case,” Charles Benbrook, an agricultural economist and author of the 2016 study, told EHN.

Ecological Impacts Emerge
Glyphosate has been used as a broad-spectrum herbicide, meaning it kills all vegetation it’s sprayed on, since the 1970s. Its use at the outset, however, was limited. Farmers and land managers could only spray it where they wanted to kill all vegetation, for instance, between the rows in orchards or vineyards, in industrial yards, or along train tracks or powerline rights of way.

That all changed in 1996, when the Missouri-based agrochemical company Monsanto (now part of the pharmaceutical giant Bayer) introduced glyphosate-tolerant crops — first corn, then soybeans, cotton and others. Farmers could spray it on and around their fields without accidentally killing their crops.

The chemical soon became the most heavily used herbicide in history.

Global glyphosate use has risen nearly 15-fold since the mid-90s, with an estimated 19 percent of global use happening in the U.S. alone.

Since this change, much has been made about the potential health impacts to humans from widespread use. In 2015, the World Health Organization classified glyphosate as “probably carcinogenic to humans” due to a growing body of research linking glyphosate to non-Hodgkin lymphoma and other cancers.

In August, a U.S. groundskeeper won a landmark lawsuit against Monsanto, saying his deadly form of non-Hodgkin lymphoma was due to years of exposure to the company’s herbicide. Monsanto and its German owner Bayer now face more than 9,000 similar lawsuits. The company repeatedly has maintained there is no link between glyphosate and cancer.

Numerous studies in laboratory animals, too, have suggested the chemical may have reproductive effects at levels considered safe by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.


That is why I try to buy all my wheat and sugar organic, since they are 2 that are hit heavily with roundup.   

Corn and soy are the most heavily impacted. Most of those are fed to animals before we eat it, however.
Title: Re: Does anyone here mill their own flour/other grain at home?
Post by: Lynne on March 25, 2019, 08:50:41 AM


Corn and soy are the most heavily impacted. Most of those are fed to animals before we eat it, however.

That's why one should try to eat grass-fed animals and dairy products.
Title: Re: Does anyone here mill their own flour/other grain at home?
Post by: MundaCorMeum on March 25, 2019, 03:08:39 PM
I've been making sourdough for almost a year now, and I love it!  I was using just the king Arthur brand, all purpose, unbleached flour.  I've recently been wanting to branch out and try kamut wheat.  I'd love to sprout and mill my own grains, but I've not been brave enough to do it, yet.  I usually just make the regular artisan boules.  I've had good success with sandwich bread before, too, but I don't make it as often.  I can't master the baguette, which is driving me nuts.  I'm determined, though, so I'll be trying again this week.  I make sourdough bagels at least once a week, too, and they are fantastic.  I'm going to look into some of the mills recommended here.  Good topic!
Title: Re: Does anyone here mill their own flour/other grain at home?
Post by: Matto on March 25, 2019, 03:25:28 PM
I've been making sourdough for almost a year now, and I love it!
I tried making sourdough bread for maybe a year or so but I failed. I could not get it to consistently rise. It tasted wonderful, better than bakery bread, but it rarely rose well so the bread was usually thick and heavy. Every once in a while it would really rise well and I got the best bread I have ever eaten, but this was only a few times. I could never understand why it rose well those few times and what I did differently that lead to my rare success. After a while I gave up because even though the bread tasted good, I did not think it was worth the effort because I could not get it to consistently rise enough. So now I no longer have a bread blob.

Does your sourdough bread consistently rise well, or is it inconsistent like mine was?
Title: Re: Does anyone here mill their own flour/other grain at home?
Post by: Traditionallyruralmom on March 25, 2019, 04:14:44 PM
I also purchased a 9 tray Excalibur dehydrator.  I sprout the grains in 1 gallon glass jars and then dry the grains in the Excalibur then grind them in the Wondermill.  The dehydrator is also very useful in raising bread.  I had a rising box forever that hubs made out of 2 Styrofoam coolers duck taped together with a light bulb on a dimmer switch for heat.  It was a plan from a sourdough book I used to have, Ed Wood Sourdoughs of the World?  and it worked very well for raising the sourdough.  But now the Excalibur works just as well, with more space. 
That being said, I have not raised any sourdough in it.  Just normal yeast bread.  I have a cultures for health sourdough starter pack in my freezer.  The last starter died the death when I had my last baby, and I have never revived it.  But I have high hopes for a day in the near future.  I am a bread cheater, and use 1/2 organic white and 1/2 of whatever whole grain crunchy thing I have.  I like the lift the 1/2 white gives it, and love the depth the whole grain lends to it.  Perfect marriage.
Title: Re: Does anyone here mill their own flour/other grain at home?
Post by: MundaCorMeum on March 26, 2019, 07:16:41 PM
I've been making sourdough for almost a year now, and I love it!
I tried making sourdough bread for maybe a year or so but I failed. I could not get it to consistently rise. It tasted wonderful, better than bakery bread, but it rarely rose well so the bread was usually thick and heavy. Every once in a while it would really rise well and I got the best bread I have ever eaten, but this was only a few times. I could never understand why it rose well those few times and what I did differently that lead to my rare success. After a while I gave up because even though the bread tasted good, I did not think it was worth the effort because I could not get it to consistently rise enough. So now I no longer have a bread blob.

Does your sourdough bread consistently rise well, or is it inconsistent like mine was?

Mine is pretty consistent, yes.  But, I also live in a climate that is mostly warm and humid throughout the year, which helps tremendously.  During winter, I do notice it effects my rise, though it still does eventually rise pretty well.  It just takes longer, so I have to be patient.  Whereas in the summer, I have to watch carefully that I don't over-proof.  But, even then, I still get a flat loaf here and there.  If that happens, I cut it up into cubes, season it with salt, pepper, olive oil, and Italian seasoning, then toast it for croutons.  Or, slice it then and toast it for bruschetta.  It works great for both of those purposes; or, I'll put it in the food processor for bread crumbs.  I've tried it as bread pudding, as well, but it was a little too dense, and didn't soak up the egg/milk mixture very well.  The kids will still eat it, though, so at least it isn't wasted.


There's nothing quite as satisfying as putting my sourdough in my cast iron for almost an hour in a hot oven, then opening the lid to see a great oven spring!!   :cheeseheadbeer: 
Title: Re: Does anyone here mill their own flour/other grain at home?
Post by: Lynne on March 27, 2019, 09:16:59 AM
Here's an interesting book/website on creating a sourdough bread in 5 minutes a day! Catchy title, eh?

https://artisanbreadinfive.com/2017/02/06/easy-sourdough-starter/ (https://artisanbreadinfive.com/2017/02/06/easy-sourdough-starter/)
Title: Re: Does anyone here mill their own flour/other grain at home?
Post by: Padraig on March 31, 2019, 01:33:19 PM
If you have about ten spare minutes, this is one of the best (and funniest) articles on baking sourdough that I've read:
https://hammersandhoney.com/blog/thesourdouvolution
Title: Re: Does anyone here mill their own flour/other grain at home?
Post by: Padraig on April 01, 2019, 10:43:17 AM
Figured I would share my latest bread creation here. This is about 20% rye, full sourdough.

As far as the question of flour mills, I've decided to hold out for a Mockmill, once they're back in stock. I'll share more pictures of bread once that happens.
Title: Re: Does anyone here mill their own flour/other grain at home?
Post by: Lynne on April 01, 2019, 11:35:43 AM
Figured I would share my latest bread creation here. This is about 20% rye, full sourdough.

As far as the question of flour mills, I've decided to hold out for a Mockmill, once they're back in stock. I'll share more pictures of bread once that happens.

That's beautiful!
Title: Re: Does anyone here mill their own flour/other grain at home?
Post by: MundaCorMeum on April 01, 2019, 09:12:20 PM
Figured I would share my latest bread creation here. This is about 20% rye, full sourdough.

As far as the question of flour mills, I've decided to hold out for a Mockmill, once they're back in stock. I'll share more pictures of bread once that happens.


Nice!  Are you any good at making designs with the bread lame?   I have high aspirations, but I really kind of stink at it  ;D  It's fun to try, though.  Today I made a sourdough cinnamon swirl bread.  I'll see how it cuts tomorrow.  It needs to cool some more tonight.
Title: Re: Does anyone here mill their own flour/other grain at home?
Post by: Padraig on April 01, 2019, 10:09:32 PM
I do get creative sometimes. I still think the central slash is the most attractive (especially if you put a leaf design next to it), but the large X across the top with small slashes between the arms is another I'm fond of. It looks sort of like a blossom opening up. :) I also had a spiral slash turn out really well, one time.

I found my bread scoring got better when I bought better blades. Astra blades are incredibly sharp, hold their edge really well, and don't rust quickly. I end up losing blades much faster than I use them up.
I think the real key to good slashes, though is developing a good skin on the surface of the bread. That's what causes the "ear" to rise up, so that the slash doesn't stay flat and blend into the surface of the finished loaf. The best way to do this is to do the final rise in the fridge, uncovered. As an added bonus, this is also what causes the loaf not to stick to the rising basket, and it lets you time your bake a little better. You can mix in the evening, rise overnight, and bake in the morning, with the loaf turning out cleanly, and your slash really standing out.  :D
Title: Re: Does anyone here mill their own flour/other grain at home?
Post by: MundaCorMeum on April 03, 2019, 10:12:45 PM
Well, I can cut a central slash all day long, so I guess I'm not as bad as I thought  8).  I always cover my dough in the fridge.  I'll try uncovered next time.  My last boule this past week didn't oven spring.  I think I over proved it.  I was pleased with my cinnamon swirl bread, though.  The kids already devoured both loaves, minus the slices I sent with my husband for breakfast.  I'm baking two more loaves tonight, except one is plain for sandwich bread. 
Title: Re: Does anyone here mill their own flour/other grain at home?
Post by: Maximilian on April 03, 2019, 10:54:41 PM
Beautiful structure to the bread.
Title: Re: Does anyone here mill their own flour/other grain at home?
Post by: Padraig on April 04, 2019, 11:08:26 AM
It's a little harder with a loaf pan, but I found baking the boule in a Dutch oven really helps with over spring. That loaf that I posted a picture of was one I was really worried about when I took it out of the fridge, I though I must have underproved it, and it wasn't going to rise. But I kept it in the pot with the lid on for most of the bake time, and it just kept rising. I only took it out of the pot for the last 5 or 10 minutes of the bake.

It's always fun tinkering with the variables, though. Oven temp, dough temp (cold from the fridge v. allowed to come to room temp), steam, slashes, there's always something new to try in the endless search for the perfect loaf :)
Title: Re: Does anyone here mill their own flour/other grain at home?
Post by: MundaCorMeum on April 04, 2019, 11:24:17 AM
Beautiful structure to the bread.

Thank you!
Title: Re: Does anyone here mill their own flour/other grain at home?
Post by: Traditionallyruralmom on April 07, 2019, 08:51:43 PM
I have had great fun and success with the "My Bread" book and method.  You use 1/2 tsp yeast and give it an 18 hour ferment, no kneading.  Cook in cast iron dutch oven.  Rustic, artisan, chewy, everything trendy...yet so simple it must have been what the peasants of our ancestry did. 
Title: Re: Does anyone here mill their own flour/other grain at home?
Post by: drummerboy on October 22, 2019, 11:22:08 AM
https://victoriostore.com/deluxe-grain-mill.html

Will be ordering this soon.  My wife is gluten intolerant, and my doctor recommended I avoid it, as gluten can often irritate autoimmune disorders, which being diabetic I have, so  anything gluten free is $$$$.  I'd like to make my own rice and oat flours, but what I really want to do is make pea. lentil, chickpea flours for pasta, which is delicious and extremely nutritious but at $3 a box in store forget it, I'll make it myself.  It can grind coffee beans too, so what's not to love.
Title: Re: Does anyone here mill their own flour/other grain at home?
Post by: MundaCorMeum on February 12, 2020, 11:14:21 PM
I'm going to throw caution to the wind and revive this old thread....has anyone been baking lately?  I've been picking up the habit again, now that I am no longer pregnant.  I have been really enjoying it!  I made a sourdough focaccia a few weeks ago that was excellent. I want to make another soon.  What have y'all been baking??
Title: Re: Does anyone here mill their own flour/other grain at home?
Post by: Lynne on February 13, 2020, 07:58:47 AM
I've been baking nothing!   ;)

I would like to bake bread once a month because I love bread. I've been doing intermittent fasting *and* keto but I do miss bread...
Title: Re: Does anyone here mill their own flour/other grain at home?
Post by: MundaCorMeum on February 13, 2020, 02:18:07 PM
I've been baking nothing!   ;)

I would like to bake bread once a month because I love bread. I've been doing intermittent fasting *and* keto but I do miss bread...

Is sourdough allowed on keto?
Title: Re: Does anyone here mill their own flour/other grain at home?
Post by: Gardener on February 13, 2020, 02:52:03 PM
Could always do cloud bread.

Sourdough would not fall within keto rules for carbs.
Title: Re: Does anyone here mill their own flour/other grain at home?
Post by: MundaCorMeum on February 13, 2020, 05:22:46 PM
What is cloud bread?
Title: Re: Does anyone here mill their own flour/other grain at home?
Post by: Gardener on February 13, 2020, 05:40:48 PM
What is cloud bread?

https://www.purewow.com/food/Cloud-Bread-Recipe
Title: Re: Does anyone here mill their own flour/other grain at home?
Post by: Lynne on February 13, 2020, 06:02:22 PM
I've been baking nothing!   ;)

I would like to bake bread once a month because I love bread. I've been doing intermittent fasting *and* keto but I do miss bread...

Is sourdough allowed on keto?

In theory, one can eat any food on a keto diet, as long as you stay below 20g of carbs a day... A 4" x 2 1/2" slice of sourdough bread is 32g.  :wag:

 :eek:
Title: Re: Does anyone here mill their own flour/other grain at home?
Post by: MundaCorMeum on February 14, 2020, 04:06:12 PM
What is cloud bread?

https://www.purewow.com/food/Cloud-Bread-Recipe

Yeah, I'll just stick with my sourdough, thanks  :cheeseheadbeer:
Title: Re: Does anyone here mill their own flour/other grain at home?
Post by: drummerboy on July 16, 2020, 12:44:33 PM
I picked up a bushel each of wheat and rye for $26 at the nearby feedmill.  We have to watch out for stray corn kernels or protein pellets, but the price is unbeatable.  We'll do a coarse grind in our Victorio food mill, then sift it in a fine mesh strainer.  The result is a somewhat fine whole wheat "white" flour, and plenty of bran to use in flatbread (like Swedish knackerbrod) or as breadcrumbs
Title: Re: Does anyone here mill their own flour/other grain at home?
Post by: diaduit on July 16, 2020, 04:35:21 PM
I picked up a bushel each of wheat and rye for $26 at the nearby feedmill.  We have to watch out for stray corn kernels or protein pellets, but the price is unbeatable.  We'll do a coarse grind in our Victorio food mill, then sift it in a fine mesh strainer.  The result is a somewhat fine whole wheat "white" flour, and plenty of bran to use in flatbread (like Swedish knackerbrod) or as breadcrumbs

What do you think of a Country manual mill?  is it worth the money?  Going to buy bags of grain for storage and for using but wouldn't have the mill...I want quality but is Country mill OTT.
Title: Re: Does anyone here mill their own flour/other grain at home?
Post by: drummerboy on July 18, 2020, 11:26:54 AM
I like the Victorio as you can purchase an electric motor separately, but still use the hand crank if necessary.  It doesn't have the nice flywheel like the country mill so hand cranking isn't as "pleasant," but that motor is much appreciated, there's a reason people switched to electric after all.
Title: Re: Does anyone here mill their own flour/other grain at home?
Post by: Lynne on August 23, 2020, 05:29:38 PM
Kind of a side track but using spent grain, from brewing beer, is a great way to make low carb bread.  Unfortunately, the two breweries that I've spoken to send their spent grain to farms for animal slop.
Title: Re: Does anyone here mill their own flour/other grain at home?
Post by: MundaCorMeum on August 23, 2020, 05:52:16 PM
Kind of a side track but using spent grain, from brewing beer, is a great way to make low carb bread.  Unfortunately, the two breweries that I've spoken to send their spent grain to farms for animal slope.

I almost tried this last time my husband brewed beer (a few years ago), but life circumstances got in the way, and it didn't happen.
Title: Re: Does anyone here mill their own flour/other grain at home?
Post by: Lynne on August 23, 2020, 05:53:40 PM
Kind of a side track but using spent grain, from brewing beer, is a great way to make low carb bread.  Unfortunately, the two breweries that I've spoken to send their spent grain to farms for animal slope.

I almost tried this last time my husband brewed beer (a few years ago), but life circumstances got in the way, and it didn't happen.

I know! So many projects, so little time!

Title: Re: Does anyone here mill their own flour/other grain at home?
Post by: drummerboy on September 03, 2020, 01:11:51 PM
Kind of a side track but using spent grain, from brewing beer, is a great way to make low carb bread.  Unfortunately, the two breweries that I've spoken to send their spent grain to farms for animal slop.

I would hardly call it slop; brewers' grain is super nutritious (also very high in estrogens) and extremely beneficial to cows' milk production, similar to nursing women who take brewers' yeast tablets to promote lactation.  Farmers pay good money for it when they can get it
Title: Re: Does anyone here mill their own flour/other grain at home?
Post by: drummerboy on September 03, 2020, 01:14:12 PM
Kind of a side track but using spent grain, from brewing beer, is a great way to make low carb bread.  Unfortunately, the two breweries that I've spoken to send their spent grain to farms for animal slope.

I almost tried this last time my husband brewed beer (a few years ago), but life circumstances got in the way, and it didn't happen.

As a side note, hops are a sedative and an anaphrodisiac, which explains why beer makes men sleepy and sluggish.  Try making beer without the hops, they're mostly a preservative and bittering agent.
Title: Re: Does anyone here mill their own flour/other grain at home?
Post by: Lynne on September 03, 2020, 03:05:47 PM
Kind of a side track but using spent grain, from brewing beer, is a great way to make low carb bread.  Unfortunately, the two breweries that I've spoken to send their spent grain to farms for animal slop.

I would hardly call it slop; brewers' grain is super nutritious (also very high in estrogens) and extremely beneficial to cows' milk production, similar to nursing women who take brewers' yeast tablets to promote lactation.  Farmers pay good money for it when they can get it

Darn! Well, that's what they're doing with it... Darn!

And I'm not going to start brewing beer to get the spent grain.  :P