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The Parish Hall => General News and Discussion => Topic started by: Heinrich on December 20, 2018, 10:54:53 PM

Title: Bad week for El Presidente
Post by: Heinrich on December 20, 2018, 10:54:53 PM
From Judge Napolitano laying out the legal framework for his likely firing squad consequence, to Kavanaugh doing his best bait and switch, wall withdrawal, DOW having a cow, etc., it appears Trump is taking his worst lumps to date. What are people's analyses? I, for one, am quite upset at the bump stock ban. Challengeable under 5th amendment?
Title: Re: Bad week for El Presidente
Post by: Jacob on December 20, 2018, 11:05:49 PM
As far as the Dow, reading the situation depends on who you read.  Those who see the Dow as a serious marker of how the economy is doing are obviously seeing signs of recession or whatever.  Those who've been saying all along Trump is leading a realignment away from Wall Street and back to Main Street are not concerned at all, but rather see the Dow's fluctuations as signs of progress.
Title: Re: Bad week for El Presidente
Post by: Lambda Phage on December 21, 2018, 08:41:42 AM
I think the last couple days have been great. He is actually being firm on the wall and he is finally doing what he said he would do about the middle east. Mattis gone is a victory, provided Trump actually does replace him with somebody of similar foreign policy persuasion to Trump, which is obviously what he will look for at this point.

The key is not to listen to the media. That's my one hope with regards to Trump supporters. I read Mattis' letter and I thought it was very professional and respectful to the President. I read Bloomberg's spin on the letter and it was as if they read a completely different letter. Of course they read the same letter, but these people have evil flowing through their veins.

Syria withdrawal is a huge win. Afghanistan withdrawal needs to be all or nothing. A partial withdrawal is risky. It could work but it could also backfire. Both withdrawals, I'm confident, will happen. Though I'm probably the only one currently in country who thinks it will happen.

I don't blame Trump for the stock market. Will it hurt him? Sure, but maybe not too severely. The 2018 election exit polls suggested that people might be finally willing to admit that the economy is not the top issue, and they will vote their ideology no matter what.

The troop withdrawal may be an attempt to improve economic/budget conditons as well. The wall is cheap compared to Afghanistan.
Title: Re: Bad week for El Presidente
Post by: Michael Wilson on December 21, 2018, 09:04:41 AM
Re. The Economy; people regard the economy as how it affects them personally; as long as there is full employment, Trump has a good chance to be re-elected. One of the bright spots in this week's news and which the media has partially buried and totally ignored is the news that blue collar job wages have jumped and the economist are giving credit/blame to Trump's more restrictive immigration policies; the blue collar vote is the one that Trump needs to win in states like Michigan and Wisconsin; so this is good news.
And this:
Quote

U.S. Workers Get Biggest Pay Jump Since 2009 as Unemployment Rate Holds at 48-Year Low
American workers enjoyed the biggest leap in pay since 2009 as job gains topped forecasts and the unemployment rate held at a 48-year low, a boost for President Donald Trump ahead of next week’s midterm elections and reason for the Federal Reserve to keep raising interest rates.

Nonfarm payrolls rose 250,000 after a downwardly revised 118,000 gain, a Labor Department report showed Friday. The median estimate in a Bloomberg survey called for an increase of 200,000 jobs. Average hourly earnings for private workers advanced 3.1 percent from a year earlier and the unemployment rate was unchanged from September at 3.7 percent, both matching projections.

The figures give Republicans another economic accomplishment to tout ahead of Tuesday’s midterm elections as they seek to defend control of Congress from what polls indicate will be Democratic gains. The continued hiring and wage increases also reflect a tax-cut boost and reinforce expectations that the central bank will raise interest rates for a fourth time this year in December, though such an outlook may further unsettle investors who just sent U.S. stocks to their worst month since 2011.

“The labor market is cookin’, and that’s the bottom line,” said Ward McCarthy, chief financial economist at Jefferies LLC. “What’s really impressive is that the unemployment rate would’ve declined if the participation rate hadn’t risen, and that’s a good thing. You still have more people coming back to the labor market. There’s a lot to like.”

U.S. stock futures declined after the report, while the dollar trimmed losses and 10-year Treasury yields were higher.

The October data may be less of an indicator of the trend than usual because they reflect distortions from hurricanes both this year and last year. Meanwhile, the U.S. trade war with China poses a risk to further gains and companies may be slowing capital investment.

The Labor Department said 198,000 people weren’t at work due to bad weather, reflecting Hurricane Michael’s impact on Florida, following 299,000 in September amid Hurricane Florence. That compares with 36,000 people not at work due to weather in the year-ago period. Michael had “no discernible effect” on national employment and unemployment estimates for October, the Labor Department said.

What Our Economists Say
The October jobs report provided reassurance that the economy is on sound footing, despite the dramatic seesaw in the pace of hiring gains over the past several months. The breadth of job creation remains solid — an important indication that the escalation of trade tensions is not being whitewashed by short-lived fiscal stimulus stemming from tax cuts. Furthermore, the pace of hiring is robust, especially after accounting for hurricane distortions.– Carl Riccadonna, Yelena Shulyatyeva and Tim Mahedy, Bloomberg EconomicsRead more for the full note here.

Restaurants and bars — an industry where most workers only get paid if they show up to work — saw a 33,500 increase in payrolls, following a 10,000 decrease in September that reflected Florence’s impact.

Average hourly earnings rose 0.2 percent from the prior month, also matching analyst projections, following a 0.3 percent gain, the report showed. The annual increase of 3.1 percent followed a 2.8 percent advance.

The year-over-year change reflects possibly storm-boosted figures in October and storm-depressed numbers the prior year, though companies have also been steadily raising pay to attract and retain workers.

Even so, the long-awaited gains follow relatively tepid increases throughout the current expansion, which in mid-2019 will become the longest in U.S. history. The advances are probably still not rapid enough, though, to spur inflation concerns among Fed officials, rather keeping them on a path of gradual interest-rate hikes.

Here are other highlights from the report:

Payrolls
Revisions were a net wash for payrolls in prior two months, as August was revised up 16,000 and September revised down 16,000; three-month average gain of 218,000 Payroll increases were broad-based, including 30,000 in construction, 32,000 in manufacturing and 179,000 in services; retailers added 2,400 following a 32,400 decline Private payrolls rose by 246,000, compared with median estimate of 195,000; government payrolls increased by 4,000

Wages
Average hourly earnings for production and non-supervisory workers increased 3.2 percent from a year earlier, following 2.8 percent in September Average work week increased to 34.5 hours, from 34.4 hours in prior month; a shorter workweek has the effect of boosting average hourly pay

Household Survey
Participation rate increased to 62.9 percent from 62.7 percent the prior month; measure tracks share of working- age people in labor force Employment-population ratio rose to 60.6 percent from 60.4 percent U-6, or underemployment rate, fell to 7.4 percent from 7.5 percent; includes part-time workers wanting full-time job, people who aren’t actively looking

This should be headline news, and it would have been under a Democratic president. But people that are getting paid well and are financially better off under Trump, will have a tendency to vote for him, despite the gloom and doom spin doctors saying otherwise.
Title: Re: Bad week for El Presidente
Post by: Lambda Phage on December 21, 2018, 09:05:37 AM
The bump stock ban is frankly stupid. You have an item that was already determined by the ATF not to turn a firearm into a machine gun. Somebody used it to kill people, and now they decide that it does turn a firearm into a machine gun. The disturbing precedence here to me is less with regards to firearms and more to philosophy in general. You can't change the definition of a thing just because of outrage. The man did not use the device in a novel way. Functionally, it did what it was supposed to do. It's  horrible that he killed people with it, but we learned nothing new about the nature of bump stocks and what they are capable of. If it was not a machine gun part before hand, it can't magically be one now simply because somebody committed a particularly appalling crime with it. That has no bearing on what it actually is.

That said, Trump initially did say he was going to ban them, so it's not like he flipped on it.

Kavanaugh is disappointing, but I don't think it's going to be a trend. He's just your standard modern man with a complete lack of moral courage.
Title: Re: Bad week for El Presidente
Post by: Josephine87 on December 21, 2018, 02:23:04 PM
Can people please elucidate on some of these topics? I don't watch the news.
Title: Re: Bad week for El Presidente
Post by: Graham on December 21, 2018, 02:29:53 PM
With the new congress coming in about 2 weeks, Trump is in a tight spot. I suspect it won't be long until impeachment proceedings begin. The only question is whether they will wait for the Mueller thing to wrap up and produce a report that can be construed as "damning," thus delaying for several months, or whether they will decide it isn't necessary to wait. It is theatre of course but will distract Trump and waste time and energy and provide cover for Dem obstructionism and cuck moves by never-Trump Republicans like incoming Romney.

In this context Trump is moving away from a strategy of rapprochement with the establishment to one of greater independence and mobility. Kelly and now Mattis are out. I think we will see more EOs (and more court challenges) and more interesting, populist foreign policy moves in 2019. The good news is that when everything seems to be going haywire and nobody is sure what to do, Trump is in his element.
Title: Re: Bad week for El Presidente
Post by: Michael Wilson on December 21, 2018, 04:45:44 PM
Yes, the Democratic strategy is obvious: Make Trump's image as toxic as possible so that they can run a "centrist" campaign in 2020; smart strategy, it worked partially in the 2018 midterms, so they will double down for the next round. It all depends on the small band of "undecideds" that voted for Trump in the last elections.
Title: Re: Bad week for El Presidente
Post by: Lambda Phage on December 21, 2018, 09:47:55 PM
https://apnews.com/1c239d63b2634f9caadd4053bae058d8

At least Kavanaugh was right on this one. He ephed up bad on the Planned Parenthood case, but he is not a  Justice Roberts.
Title: Re: Bad week for El Presidente
Post by: james03 on December 22, 2018, 01:58:11 AM
Quote
it worked partially in the 2018 midterms,
  No, it was demographics.  The House vote tells everything.  Even in the Senate, if we were as good as a 50/50 split, we should have gotten to 58 Senators.  We only have 53.  And we will probably lose McCain's replacement.

Trumps only hope for 2020 is keeping the union vote.  That gets him the rust belt.  The dems will go further hard left to appease their 3rd world savage constituency.

The wall is meaningless.  As long as you have anchor babies and chain migration, it only gets worse.  I think Trump can hold Florida for 2020, but it will be a squeaker if he does.  After 2020, the US is a third world $h!thole forever.
Title: Re: Bad week for El Presidente
Post by: Lambda Phage on December 22, 2018, 08:54:32 AM
I think he'll keep Ohio. Michigan and Wisconsin, not sure.

The Buckeye state looks fairly red these days - possible demographic shift from millenials and city dwellers moving south?
Title: Re: Bad week for El Presidente
Post by: james03 on December 22, 2018, 11:00:17 AM
The governor of Wisconsin, who saved and fully funded public pensions was kicked out.  I don't think Trump holds Wisconsin.  My real hope is that the Dems will run another psycho, and Trump will win.

But it's all about demographics.  Reagan caved on amnesty, and California, an old swing State, became a communist third world $h!thole forever.  It looks like we have now lost Arizona, but if not, it will be gone before the 2024 election.  Florida also will eventually fall as elections are getting tighter and tighter.  Look at the recent governor's race.  Eventually we will lose Texas, but that's further out.  Just like it is now a certainty that England will become moslem, it is now a certainty that the US will become a third world $h!thole country with latin americans running through the streets banging on pots and pans bleating for the government to take care of them.

We all like to make fun of "teeth and eyes", the Ocasio Ortez lune.  Keep in mind she was elected due to demographics.  And I am completely serious, she will be our President some day.  She's young now, but she may have a shot in 2024 after Florida has fallen, but definitely she would win in 2028.

The Wall will do some minor good.  However the Christ killers have shifted tactics and are training the savages to claim asylum.  No need to jump the border, just go to a crossing, pregnant, and claim asylum.  Have an anchor baby.  Rinse and repeat.  Then there is chain migration.  If you get your 35 year old grandmother in, she can get citizenship.  After that, she then applies for chain migration for her brothers and sisters.  Brothers and sisters have spouses who have brothers and sisters and grandparents.  They get citizenship, and we get the exponential growth.

Note this is WITH Trump.  Chain migration, asylum, and anchor babies are permanent with out congress.  So it's over for us.  And once the next Dem becomes President, possibly in 2020, but definitely by 2024, they will open the flood gates and it is over at an accelerated pace.   Texas won't last past 2028, but it won't matter.  New York, Florida, California, and Arizona basically guarantee victory when you throw in the Pac NW, Illinois, and the North East.  Assuming you pick up Wisconsin, Ohio, and Michigan, Pennsylvania becomes the swing state.  This assumes we hold North Carolina, since we already lost Virginia.  It is blue.

It's over.  If you are young, learn Russian and leave.  Nows the time to do it.  And then there is the ballooning $22 TRILLION debt.
Title: Re: Bad week for El Presidente
Post by: Lambda Phage on December 23, 2018, 03:50:17 AM
Why not German, and move to Austria or Switzerland? Or Polish or Slovak? Or Hungarian?

You at least have the Catholic Church and potentially Latin Masses in those countries. Not in Russia.

Or if you're just looking to escape a collapsing world, why not New Zealand? They speak English and are far removed from everyone else.
Title: Re: Bad week for El Presidente
Post by: james03 on December 23, 2018, 02:23:09 PM
Realistically speaking, I think the best place is Chile.  Very civilized and free.  There's a reason you don't see caravans coming up from Chile.  Pinochet pitched all of the leftists out of helicopters and the country is well run.  They actually have a solvent retirement system and no crisis.  It's still pretty Catholic, which is why they were so pissed when they found out about the pedophile cover ups there.  It's also out of the way for the coming conflict.  The only problem is their strategic importance for copper.

I like the Polish a lot.  They are the best field craftsman in the world.  However unfortunately a Pole puts a Scots to shame when it comes to stubbornness, and they really hate Russians.  So even if the Russians lined up a huge army to invade, the Poles would probably go to the border to moon them and flip them off.

Hungary would probably be the best pick, or the Slovak republic if you are interested in Europe, however I understand that learning Hungarian is difficult.
Title: Re: Bad week for El Presidente
Post by: Heinrich on December 23, 2018, 03:49:01 PM
Chile is clearly the front runner for any Catholic wanting to expat. But we have to remember, this is not an Anglo Saxon culture. Meaning: mańana time rules. This can be good or bad, depending how hungry you are. So if you are going to learn Spanish, why not just suck it up and stay where you are? Laus did say there is an Una Voce Russia which provides resources on finding a Latin Mass in Rusher.
Title: Re: Bad week for El Presidente
Post by: Josephine87 on December 23, 2018, 04:12:58 PM
Chile is clearly the front runner for any Catholic wanting to expat. But we have to remember, this is not an Anglo Saxon culture. Meaning: mańana time rules. This can be good or bad, depending how hungry you are. So if you are going to learn Spanish, why not just suck it up and stay where you are? Laus did say there is an Una Voce Russia which provides resources on finding a Latin Mass in Rusher.

There are small numbers of Mennonites in central South America who contribute significantly to food production, far beyond their numbers. The fear in SA is whether you get to keep what you produce.
Title: Re: Bad week for El Presidente
Post by: Lambda Phage on December 24, 2018, 06:43:44 AM
Hmm, I've never considered Chile.

But I've thought of everywhere in Europe and decide each time that it's better just to stay here. Lichtenstein would be my pick if I could go anywhere, but it's not without its issues. One, property is outrageously unaffordable. Two, it's next to impossible to homeschool, same with most other "good" European countries. Three, you're going to have rich Muslims living out the days of their retirement as neighbors. Four there are no Latin Masses. Five, you probably won't get in in the first place. Every place but heaven has major problems.

Better to just live in the States, either in the country or near good people, and buy a nuclear bunker. Things are cheap here compared to other developed countries, we can homeschool with near complete freedom, I get paid more here than I would in most developed countries, there's a Latin Mass in most major cities, and it is simple and requires the least amount of change.

But I'll be ready to move if I ever have to. Staying put allows me to be prepared for pretty much anything and is the best prospect as far as I can tell of keeping my family safe and sacred.
Title: Re: Bad week for El Presidente
Post by: Antoninus on December 24, 2018, 07:57:28 AM
I've been thinking of relocating to Chile for a while. Does anyone know if Peru or Paraguay would also be relatively safe places to move? I haven't heard of any turmoil in those countries.
Title: Re: Bad week for El Presidente
Post by: Davis Blank - EG on December 24, 2018, 10:00:53 AM
Does anyone have any knowledge of homeschooling in Poland (other than merely googling it, which I've already done)?

Poland and Russia seem like the only acceptable places, although perhaps Chile is as well.  Back when I was a libertarian (shudder), that was the hot place for anarchists to go.
Title: Re: Bad week for El Presidente
Post by: Michael Wilson on December 24, 2018, 10:08:56 AM
A member here, Big Bad Trad visited South America with the idea of moving his family there; he finally settled in Europe; I will P.M. Him and see if he would post some of his impressions of the countries he visited and hear his recommendations. 
Title: Re: Bad week for El Presidente
Post by: Lambda Phage on December 24, 2018, 12:28:30 PM
A member here, Big Bad Trad visited South America with the idea of moving his family there; he finally settled in Europe; I will P.M. Him and see if he would post some of his impressions of the countries he visited and hear his recommendations.

That would be great.
Title: Re: Bad week for El Presidente
Post by: Lambda Phage on December 24, 2018, 12:52:23 PM
I'm not really seeing what Chile has to offer. Abortion was de-criminalized last year and fags have been getting married there since 2015, albeit they called it "civil unions" at the time. The constitution has since been amended to redefine marriage as between two persons rather than man and woman. The welfare state is bigger there than here...

A higher percentage of people report being Catholic... That's nice if it actually means anything. It just looks like a less communist version of pretty much every other Latin American country, and heading in the same wrong direction as every Western country to me.

What am I missing?
Title: Re: Bad week for El Presidente
Post by: Sempronius on December 24, 2018, 01:04:56 PM
The biggest problem in eastern european countries is to find a job. My cousin earned 340 $ a month. Somehow they manage with that salary, living in their parents house and not travelling anywhere.
Title: Re: Bad week for El Presidente
Post by: Lambda Phage on December 25, 2018, 04:50:54 AM
Yeah. I'm in the middle east right now working with soldiers from mostly the west slavic countries. I absolutely love these people. But they tell me they get paid like crap in their countries. It just doesn't seem like its worth it. If you move to any of those countries you're going to be on the front lines of war if it ever breaks out with Russia. And their languages are useless outside their own individual borders.

That's why I like Liechtenstein. You learn German, which is not only easier for English speakers to learn, but it also opens up the possibility of Switzerland or Austria, all three of which are neutral. You'll probably have to live in Switzerland first anyway if you want to get to Liechtenstein. None of these countries would stand in Russia's way. Liechtenstein doesn't even have a military, so unlike Switzerland the government will leave you and your sons alone.

I met a Norwegian here who was a great guy. Norway is one of the wealthiest countries. But he told me the cost of living there is out of control. Their taxes aren't even that bad, but I guess when the government pays for your school and retirement and healthcare nobody cares about saving money so they have no problem spending all of their pay check on overpriced goods.

At the end of the day I feel like the world sucks so bad that the only reason to leave your home country, barring the exceptional employment circumstances that some people are subject to, is to "rage quit." Basically you're just so filled with hatred of your country that you settle on an inferior option simply because it's not, in our case, America. And I don't think that's very healthy spiritually.
Title: Re: Bad week for El Presidente
Post by: Gardener on December 25, 2018, 09:09:25 AM
Yeah. I'm in the middle east right now working with soldiers from mostly the west slavic countries. I absolutely love these people. But they tell me they get paid like crap in their countries. It just doesn't seem like its worth it. If you move to any of those countries you're going to be on the front lines of war if it ever breaks out with Russia. And their languages are useless outside their own individual borders.

That's why I like Liechtenstein. You learn German, which is not only easier for English speakers to learn, but it also opens up the possibility of Switzerland or Austria, all three of which are neutral. You'll probably have to live in Switzerland first anyway if you want to get to Liechtenstein. None of these countries would stand in Russia's way. Liechtenstein doesn't even have a military, so unlike Switzerland the government will leave you and your sons alone.

I met a Norwegian here who was a great guy. Norway is one of the wealthiest countries. But he told me the cost of living there is out of control. Their taxes aren't even that bad, but I guess when the government pays for your school and retirement and healthcare nobody cares about saving money so they have no problem spending all of their pay check on overpriced goods.

At the end of the day I feel like the world sucks so bad that the only reason to leave your home country, barring the exceptional employment circumstances that some people are subject to, is to "rage quit." Basically you're just so filled with hatred of your country that you settle on an inferior option simply because it's not, in our case, America. And I don't think that's very healthy spiritually.

Going through this process right now with an interstate move process, investigating whether or not it's legitimately a value add to move out of Colorado, most likely to Oklahoma.

The more one investigates, the less simple it is. For example, Oklahoma is a state which taxes groceries across the board, rather than as in here in CO where only certain items are taxed. So, wondering what that might look like we set out to look into how to figure out the formula. My plan was to simply go "shopping" when we finally visit Oklahoma and tally up the difference without actually buying 2 weeks of food. My wife, being the ingenious little thing that she is, decided to use the Walmart grocery pickup app and do a typical cart but then change the zip code to the area we'd be going. Voila. $5 tax (CO) vs ~$9 (OK). So a $4 difference every two weeks = ~$100 more a year for groceries. However, OK has certain stores that are cheaper than Walmart (Aldi), and, we'd be shifting our method of purchase on certain items. For example, we'd likely buy a whole side of beef at once and we'd likely do our own chickens for eggs and meat. Why? Because one of the value adds is getting 5-10 acres as a real potential. I simply won't move to just live in another neighborhood. So those things could end up driving down the initial cost of things.

Gas is cheaper in OK, too. The best local price here, even with a member discount at Sam's club, was $2.13/gal yesterday. In Tulsa, gasbuddy.com indicates a local price of ~$1.88, Sperry is 1.81, Bartlesville is $1.78 at a Phillips 66 station (makes sense, since they are literally right there in town) etc.

Assuming 20mpg and 20000 miles/year, that's 1000 gallons of gas a year. CO, at current prices, = $2,130/year whereas OK = $1,880/year for a savings of $250/year in gas, which in consideration of the grocery tax increase nets at $150/year in our favor.

Once we are able to get these local particulars down on a spreadsheet from research and on the ground asset intelligence (looking at you James03), we can begin the process of setting up pay band validators. Anything in Payband A = thanks for the offer, Company X, but I need to decline. Payband B = ok, this is workable. Payband C = we just made money in comparison. etc.

That's the material consideration. Immaterial = things like a giant yard for the kids to run around in, space to shoot my bow without some HOA-loving, "I can't even"-Starbucks drinking soccer mom freaking out, etc.



Title: Re: Bad week for El Presidente
Post by: james03 on January 01, 2019, 01:41:45 AM
Quote
What am I missing?

Chile put in place a required 5% PRIVATE retirement system.  Therefore the entire population are the capitalist owners of Chilean companies via stock.  Which means even when libtards get elected, they can't do much damage.  If they tax or over regulate companies, the stock market tanks and the libtard gets the boot.

And as a further benefit, since their retirements are backed by productions and not taxes, it is solvent.  There is zero retirement crisis in Chile.  Compare to the US, England, or Canada.  All broke.
Title: Re: Bad week for El Presidente
Post by: james03 on January 01, 2019, 01:45:00 AM
Quote
For example, we'd likely buy a whole side of beef at once and we'd likely do our own chickens for eggs and meat.
  Easy to do around here.  I've done it with two local butchers.  One time I bought direct from the butcher.  Another time my buddy sold me a cow, and I had it delivered to the butcher who slaughtered it and cut it up like I wanted.  Filled an entire chest freezer.  I think I had over 700 lbs. of meat from that one.  You save about half, but you do need a big freezer.
Title: Re: Bad week for El Presidente
Post by: Heinrich on January 01, 2019, 03:50:40 PM
Quote
What am I missing?

Chile put in place a required 5% PRIVATE retirement system.  Therefore the entire population are the capitalist owners of Chilean companies via stock.  Which means even when libtards get elected, they can't do much damage.  If they tax or over regulate companies, the stock market tanks and the libtard gets the boot.

And as a further benefit, since their retirements are backed by productions and not taxes, it is solvent.  There is zero retirement crisis in Chile.  Compare to the US, England, or Canada.  All broke.

Ah, Distributism. We thought we never new ya.
Title: Re: Bad week for El Presidente
Post by: mikemac on January 01, 2019, 03:57:17 PM
Quote
What am I missing?

Chile put in place a required 5% PRIVATE retirement system.  Therefore the entire population are the capitalist owners of Chilean companies via stock.  Which means even when libtards get elected, they can't do much damage.  If they tax or over regulate companies, the stock market tanks and the libtard gets the boot.

And as a further benefit, since their retirements are backed by productions and not taxes, it is solvent.  There is zero retirement crisis in Chile.  Compare to the US, England, or Canada.  All broke.

Ah, Distributism. We thought we never new ya.

 :D  That's what I thought when I read this too.  Actually Social Credit (no, not that crap they are now calling Social Credit in China).
Title: Re: Bad week for El Presidente
Post by: Christe Eleison on January 01, 2019, 10:28:51 PM
Quote
For example, we'd likely buy a whole side of beef at once and we'd likely do our own chickens for eggs and meat.
  Easy to do around here.  I've done it with two local butchers.  One time I bought direct from the butcher.  Another time my buddy sold me a cow, and I had it delivered to the butcher who slaughtered it and cut it up like I wanted.  Filled an entire chest freezer.  I think I had over 700 lbs. of meat from that one.  You save about half, but you do need a big freezer.

A Blessed Christmastide to you & yours, James! And a very Happy New Year 2019! :pray3:
How long can you keep meat in a freezer, without it going bad?Thanks & God Bless :pray2:
Title: Re: Bad week for El Presidente
Post by: Gardener on January 02, 2019, 12:25:34 AM
Around a year if properly stored (vacuum sealing is good), for steaks and such. Ground meat not as long. Deep freeze is best and if it fluctuates, you're playing with intestinal fire.

My plan, once we move, is to buy a Harvest Right freeze dryer and use it all the time (will pop for the oil-less pump). Since meat only absorbs the amount of water it needs, there is no worry over over-hydrating (you're not gonna make steak mush). Uncooked, freeze-dried steak can keep for up to 15 years if properly sealed in mylar bags with oxygen absorbers.

Will reconstitute the steak/pork/chicken and do our own grinding as needed for ground purposes.

One can freeze dry just about anything but high sugar items (honey -- which lasts indefinitely anyway), and high oil foods (peanut butter).

Raw eggs, desserts, full meals, etc. Best plan is to prep meals which are more of a scramble/mash. Or, individual ingredients.

A good variety of freeze dried meals in addition to staples leaves only potable water as a need. With proper storage techniques, one can store water a long while. When limits are reached, dump, clean the containers, and do it all again. Also, having high capacity filters is good, along with a solar powered or old fashioned well.

And of course, one has to defend all that. ;)

Title: Re: Bad week for El Presidente
Post by: Christe Eleison on January 02, 2019, 01:39:17 PM
Around a year if properly stored (vacuum sealing is good), for steaks and such. Ground meat not as long. Deep freeze is best and if it fluctuates, you're playing with intestinal fire.

My plan, once we move, is to buy a Harvest Right freeze dryer and use it all the time (will pop for the oil-less pump). Since meat only absorbs the amount of water it needs, there is no worry over over-hydrating (you're not gonna make steak mush). Uncooked, freeze-dried steak can keep for up to 15 years if properly sealed in mylar bags with oxygen absorbers.

Will reconstitute the steak/pork/chicken and do our own grinding as needed for ground purposes.

One can freeze dry just about anything but high sugar items (honey -- which lasts indefinitely anyway), and high oil foods (peanut butter).

Raw eggs, desserts, full meals, etc. Best plan is to prep meals which are more of a scramble/mash. Or, individual ingredients.

A good variety of freeze dried meals in addition to staples leaves only potable water as a need. With proper storage techniques, one can store water a long while. When limits are reached, dump, clean the containers, and do it all again. Also, having high capacity filters is good, along with a solar powered or old fashioned well.

And of course, one has to defend all that. ;)

Thanks for the helpful post :thumbsup: I really appreciate it.

I was wondering if you had also given thought to the following places, if not, why? I would love to hear your opinions on
the places below. Thanks so much.

-Nebraska has the FSSP in 2 locations nearby & the Seminary. The Seminarians frequently visit Lincoln & Omaha for different events. 

-Wisconsin has the Institute in different parts of the state & supposedly has good fertile land for homesteading & or small farms.

-West Virginia where Noah is located. And is relatively close to major metropolitan areas in case you need what they may offer.

-North Idaho has a huge trad population, the FSSP & the SSPX are there, a few minutes away from each other  ;)
 And people there are into homeschooling, living off the grid, homesteading, self sufficiency, guns, hunting, etc.

-Front Royal Virginia, has Christendom College, Seton Homeschool & lots of homeschoolers, trads of different shades, etc.

-Massachusetts has the Saint Benedict Center, they are in NH as well.
This group has been in Communion with Rome, on & off. They are currently in communion with Rome.
The people that attend there typically live rurally away from the center.
But they attend activities there & have access to jobs in the area. It is supposed to be a tech hub of sorts.

-New Hampshire has a great priest at the FSSP location in Nashua, the local Bishop is supportive of them.
 I believe that there  2 local orthodox Catholic Colleges nearby. I think one of the Colleges has 24 hour adoration in the dorms.
 Some students commute as well. It would be easy to be self sufficient there. There are some Catholic
 homeschooling families. Being in New England has some positives & negatives. There are great museums, libraries,
 beautiful architecture, gorgeous landscapes, culture, etc. But it is lacking in faith (according to the opinion of 3 priests that I
 have spoken with  :( )

-Kansas has SSPX, FSSP if I am not mistaken. And of course Michael Wilson & Dymphna17 ;)
Title: Re: Bad week for El Presidente
Post by: Gardener on January 02, 2019, 11:13:39 PM

Thanks for the helpful post :thumbsup: I really appreciate it.

I was wondering if you had also given thought to the following places, if not, why? I would love to hear your opinions on
the places below. Thanks so much.

-Nebraska has the FSSP in 2 locations nearby & the Seminary. The Seminarians frequently visit Lincoln & Omaha for different events. 

-Wisconsin has the Institute in different parts of the state & supposedly has good fertile land for homesteading & or small farms.

-West Virginia where Noah is located. And is relatively close to major metropolitan areas in case you need what they may offer.

-North Idaho has a huge trad population, the FSSP & the SSPX are there, a few minutes away from each other  ;)
 And people there are into homeschooling, living off the grid, homesteading, self sufficiency, guns, hunting, etc.

-Front Royal Virginia, has Christendom College, Seton Homeschool & lots of homeschoolers, trads of different shades, etc.

-Massachusetts has the Saint Benedict Center, they are in NH as well.
This group has been in Communion with Rome, on & off. They are currently in communion with Rome.
The people that attend there typically live rurally away from the center.
But they attend activities there & have access to jobs in the area. It is supposed to be a tech hub of sorts.

-New Hampshire has a great priest at the FSSP location in Nashua, the local Bishop is supportive of them.
 I believe that there  2 local orthodox Catholic Colleges nearby. I think one of the Colleges has 24 hour adoration in the dorms.
 Some students commute as well. It would be easy to be self sufficient there. There are some Catholic
 homeschooling families. Being in New England has some positives & negatives. There are great museums, libraries,
 beautiful architecture, gorgeous landscapes, culture, etc. But it is lacking in faith (according to the opinion of 3 priests that I
 have spoken with  :( )

-Kansas has SSPX, FSSP if I am not mistaken. And of course Michael Wilson & Dymphna17 ;)

Nebraska
Land prices are insane, likely due to argriculture. In conjunction with property tax and military installations in Omaha, that leaves only Lincoln as a possible tech hub. Not a lot of options in Lincoln for jobs. My former company is one of the bigger ones but Nebraska just didn't cut the mustard. The Seminary is focused on making priests, and I'm not interested in trying to make a parish life of a non-parish setting. Nor am I interested in the ego inflation that comes from being in that milieu.

Wisconsin
Cold; Way. Too. Cold. Don't care for blue.

West Virginia
Too far east.

North Idaho
Land prices aren't great. Coeur d’Alene is mainly a resort town. Jobs not plentiful and those that I've seen come up pay just enough to live in town and maybe save a little -- not what we want. Short growing season. We really looked at Idaho trying to make it work. Just didn't.

Virginia
See W.b.G.VA

Massachusetts
Politically untenable. Religiously untenable. I'd rather live in Boulder, CO than ever set foot in the People's Republik of MA. Too far east.

New Hampshire
Cold. Too far east.

Kansas

Considered it, but outside of Wichita not much going for it. Would never live in St. Mary's or Maple Hill. Internecine BS isn't my desire.
----

Our criteria included (but was not limited to) a good growing season, politically right wing, available [stable, weekly] Latin Mass, and affordable rural property. We looked at AZ, NM, WY, UT, KS, OK, etc. We also looked at Huntsville, AL.

My wife did a bunch of research as pertained to us (gun laws, homeschooling laws, vax laws, politics, taxation rate, land costs, Latin Mass, etc.) and put it in a spreadsheet. We were then able to look at various factors in a comprehensive manner. In the end, OK kept coming out on top for what we want. For others, elsewhere could be the ticket. Moreover, the Tulsa area seems to win over OKC. It also seems "Tornado alley" is shifting east to MO, AR, and AL.

All things east of the MS river have a hellacious population radius within 200 miles. In the event of a social crisis, Tulsa area is far enough away from most major cities. HSV, while being tucked in the southern Appalachian mountains, is subject to miscreants from Atlanta, Nashville, etc. It's also a defense-tech hub. I'd imagine it's a good nuke target with Redstone Arsenal there.

While I am in IT, I'm not beholden to it. If an opportunity in the oil/gas sector came along and would provide and be stable (not a boom/bust job), I'd just as happily do that. Same with any job, really. IT is just fairly easy and pays well. I don't mind getting dirty, but I won't break my back for the "satisfaction" of being a tradesman, either. I have a duty and that comes first.
Title: Re: Bad week for El Presidente
Post by: Christe Eleison on January 03, 2019, 01:20:38 AM

Thanks for the helpful post :thumbsup: I really appreciate it.

I was wondering if you had also given thought to the following places, if not, why? I would love to hear your opinions on
the places below. Thanks so much.

-Nebraska has the FSSP in 2 locations nearby & the Seminary. The Seminarians frequently visit Lincoln & Omaha for different events. 

-Wisconsin has the Institute in different parts of the state & supposedly has good fertile land for homesteading & or small farms.

-West Virginia where Noah is located. And is relatively close to major metropolitan areas in case you need what they may offer.

-North Idaho has a huge trad population, the FSSP & the SSPX are there, a few minutes away from each other  ;)
 And people there are into homeschooling, living off the grid, homesteading, self sufficiency, guns, hunting, etc.

-Front Royal Virginia, has Christendom College, Seton Homeschool & lots of homeschoolers, trads of different shades, etc.

-Massachusetts has the Saint Benedict Center, they are in NH as well.
This group has been in Communion with Rome, on & off. They are currently in communion with Rome.
The people that attend there typically live rurally away from the center.
But they attend activities there & have access to jobs in the area. It is supposed to be a tech hub of sorts.

-New Hampshire has a great priest at the FSSP location in Nashua, the local Bishop is supportive of them.
 I believe that there  2 local orthodox Catholic Colleges nearby. I think one of the Colleges has 24 hour adoration in the dorms.
 Some students commute as well. It would be easy to be self sufficient there. There are some Catholic
 homeschooling families. Being in New England has some positives & negatives. There are great museums, libraries,
 beautiful architecture, gorgeous landscapes, culture, etc. But it is lacking in faith (according to the opinion of 3 priests that I
 have spoken with  :( )

-Kansas has SSPX, FSSP if I am not mistaken. And of course Michael Wilson & Dymphna17 ;)

Nebraska
Land prices are insane, likely due to argriculture. In conjunction with property tax and military installations in Omaha, that leaves only Lincoln as a possible tech hub. Not a lot of options in Lincoln for jobs. My former company is one of the bigger ones but Nebraska just didn't cut the mustard. The Seminary is focused on making priests, and I'm not interested in trying to make a parish life of a non-parish setting. Nor am I interested in the ego inflation that comes from being in that milieu.

Wisconsin
Cold; Way. Too. Cold. Don't care for blue.

West Virginia
Too far east.

North Idaho
Land prices aren't great. Coeur d’Alene is mainly a resort town. Jobs not plentiful and those that I've seen come up pay just enough to live in town and maybe save a little -- not what we want. Short growing season. We really looked at Idaho trying to make it work. Just didn't.

Virginia
See W.b.G.VA

Massachusetts
Politically untenable. Religiously untenable. I'd rather live in Boulder, CO than ever set foot in the People's Republik of MA. Too far east.

New Hampshire
Cold. Too far east.

Kansas

Considered it, but outside of Wichita not much going for it. Would never live in St. Mary's or Maple Hill. Internecine BS isn't my desire.
----

Our criteria included (but was not limited to) a good growing season, politically right wing, available [stable, weekly] Latin Mass, and affordable rural property. We looked at AZ, NM, WY, UT, KS, OK, etc. We also looked at Huntsville, AL.

My wife did a bunch of research as pertained to us (gun laws, homeschooling laws, vax laws, politics, taxation rate, land costs, Latin Mass, etc.) and put it in a spreadsheet. We were then able to look at various factors in a comprehensive manner. In the end, OK kept coming out on top for what we want. For others, elsewhere could be the ticket. Moreover, the Tulsa area seems to win over OKC. It also seems "Tornado alley" is shifting east to MO, AR, and AL.

All things east of the MS river have a hellacious population radius within 200 miles. In the event of a social crisis, Tulsa area is far enough away from most major cities. HSV, while being tucked in the southern Appalachian mountains, is subject to miscreants from Atlanta, Nashville, etc. It's also a defense-tech hub. I'd imagine it's a good nuke target with Redstone Arsenal there.

While I am in IT, I'm not beholden to it. If an opportunity in the oil/gas sector came along and would provide and be stable (not a boom/bust job), I'd just as happily do that. Same with any job, really. IT is just fairly easy and pays well. I don't mind getting dirty, but I won't break my back for the "satisfaction" of being a tradesman, either. I have a duty and that comes first.

G.

Thanks so much for the detailed post! I really appreciate it. :thumbsup:

Regarding Nebraska I was told that Omaha has a ton of jobs, especially in your area. And that it is relatively close to Lincoln.

And when it comes to land that you have to go out a bit into the rural areas to get something affordable. And that both parishes
have a lot going on, but the Omaha one more so. The priest that started the Nashua apostolate in NH did an amazing job
with the Omaha parish. And they are the only one in the country with a bowling alley  ;). A lot of the children take
advantage of that. The Omaha parish has a strong vibrant parish life.

When it comes to Wisconsin and you mentioned Blue, are you referring to them being too Democrat & liberal or what exactly?

I was told that the Institute parish in Wausau, Wisconsin is packed, has a ton of activities & a lot of people homeschool &
homestead as well. From what I also read, it is not as cold as it used to be, and people are complaining about that.

A lot of families live in the outskirts, which is not far & have some land to be self sufficient.
People there are into hunting, growing their own food, and having their guns. People in Wausau as well as in the Green Bay
area (another Institute parish) are very different compared to the Madison & Milwaukee areas.

Supposedly, people in Wisconsin refer to that part of the state as the conservative part.
Homeschooling, homesteading, gun carrying Republicans that have God as a part of their daily lives.

Whenever I have looked at different states, I also look at the pictures of houses for sale, and one thing I loved about looking
at houses in Idaho, Nebraska, Wisconsin is that I always have seen Crucifixes, family altars, statues of Saints, a Mary's
garden & statue. And believe it or not I have seen it in conservative parts of Minnesota as well.

The pictures always give me a glimpse into the personality, faith of the place. 
I was told that when Trump visited them, the lines were super long & the place was packed.

The reason I also mentioned Wisconsin, is because I am also looking at the WATER issue. I think that over time the West coast,
and Intermountain West besides having a problem with forest fires & earthquakes, it also has a huge water problem.

I think that Colorado is one of the states where you can make a really good living as an attorney specializing in water rights, etc.
I could not believe that it is illegal to collect your own rain water, or that you may buy a property but you do not own the
water that falls on your property. That is insane!

So, besides everything you mentioned, I also looked at natural disasters (earthquakes, tornadoes, forest fires,
hurricanes, floods, etc.) And the WATER issue. What is it going to look like in the next couple of decades,
not just for you & your loved ones now, but what about when they are teens & young adults?

The first time I looked at Idaho was because I read about a couple of different families that lived off the grid & made it work.
They used greenhouses. And they lived outside of CdA, you are right, CdA has become too touristy & even unaffordable for locals.
Like I mentioned above, I also liked seeing pictures of statues, altars & Crucifixes all over every single property it seemed.

One couple I managed to speak with said how when they traveled to the East coast they were in shock to see how God is not a part
of peoples lives, while in Northern Idaho, every single person practices their faith. And if you are not a Trad, you are a conservative
Catholic. And in some cases you also find large Evangelical families there as well. Everyone seems to have large families & they all
homeschool. It is probably one of the easiest places to homeschool, no reporting at all. 

From I what I found out, the states where you do not have to report at all to the state, regarding homeschooling:
The first three are the most conservative ones.

1) Idaho
2) Alaska
3) Texas
4) Connecticut
5) New Jersey

What have you found out regarding homeschooling in OK? What about fracking? How is the water issue there?

My issue with Colorado is Water & the cost of living (and the liberal attitudes of the state)
My issue & or concern with OK would be tornadoes, fracking, earthquakes & the quality of the water due to fracking. What do you think?

Thanks & God bless you during the difficult decision making process.  :pray2: 
Title: Re: Bad week for El Presidente
Post by: Christe Eleison on January 03, 2019, 02:09:39 AM
Gardener,

If you happen to choose OK, what would be your Latin Mass options?
How far of a drive would you be from the Latin Mass locations?

Thank you! :)
Title: Re: Bad week for El Presidente
Post by: Gardener on January 03, 2019, 05:18:47 AM
Omaha has a military presence which we aren't keen on. In general, Nebraska doesn't have much going for it.

Blue - Institute. God bless them, but I'm not so enamored with them as to drag my family to what is effectively southern Canada. We looked at the search criteria with Latin Mass in mind, but also with day to day providing and other factors. Wisconsin was never on the list, Latin Mass notwithstanding.

Water - No problem in eastern Oklahoma. There's a reason they don't have basements, generally. A lot of rural properties have creeks, etc. We will seek a property with a well. As for water quality, eh. Anything can happen.

Texas - Despite the loud protestations in their favor, Texas sucks. My brothers live in Texas as do my parents. I'd never live there. The property taxes are insane. Property prices, for that matter, are insane. Unless they're not, and then there's a legitimate reason.

Homeschooling laws - best we have found based on my wife's comprehensive research:
Oklahoma
Idaho
Missouri
Texas
Michigan

Fracking - if James isn't concerned, I'm not concerned. The people in the industry don't seem bothered. If anyone thought they were on a geological timebomb, I'd suspect they'd get out.

Tornadoes - They occur many places. Colorado too.

Earthquakes - Stuff happens. I'm not concerned.

Climate change issues - the climate changes -- granted. I don't buy anthropomorphic climate change. I am not sure on predictions, and I'm not concerned with what may be in 30 years. A prediction, as far as climate, is hard to say. A few decades ago we were to enter another ice age. Now it's global warming. What if Yellowstone blows? Or the Pacific ring of fire goes bonkers and ash clouds throw us into a cooling period beyond whatever we may be entering? Who knows.

Oklahoma Latin Mass - In Tulsa, they have the FSSP and a Diocesan option. SSPX was there, but isn't any longer. OKC has SSPX and FSSP. If we live near Tulsa, anywhere from 20-45 minutes. I'm hesitant to take a job in Bartlesville since there are only a few employers there of any considerable measure. In the Tulsa area, I can hop to a different company with little impact on drive time. If I set roots in Bartlesville, and end up having to accept a job in Tulsa due to lack of local positions... that would suck. However, I'm willing to consider Bartlesville and drive further for Mass IF and only IF I get into a good ole boy style position where I'd have to poop on the CEO's desk to get fired.
Title: Re: Bad week for El Presidente
Post by: Lambda Phage on January 03, 2019, 08:38:05 AM
One thing nobody ever mentions that makes a world of difference to me, having kids and wanting a big property and all:

Red Imported Fire Ants

Good freakin luck. Somehow people in the south have adapted to these things, but they are down right sinister. And they are only spreading. I will never in my life willingly live south of the Ohio River because of them. They can and probably will spread to every state south of that, minus the very dry ones, at some point in the future if we do not invade hell and destroy the fire ant manufacturing plant there. You can "treat" your yard but have fun doing that if you have a large yard, and it won't work anyway. They will come back eventually. Very expensive, aggressive, invasive, dangerous to small children, and they destroy crops as well. They're pretty much the only man made environmental catastrophe that I am concerned about.

When I was in the south, I remember talking to people and being like "Yeah, but don't you wish you could just let your kids run around, and just lay out under the stars and fall asleep in a random patch of grass and have nothing kill you? That's life in the midwest." Usually they were amazed.

Where I'm from there are no poisonous snakes, no mountain lions, no bears. The white tail deer is the most dangerous animal. Mosquitos are around for only a couple months a year instead of year round like in the deep south, and we don't have giant freaking cockroaches that crawl or fly into your house when it rains. And it rains plenty and you can do whatever you want with water. The Great Lakes are where it's at. And at least where I lived: no earthquakes, hurricanes, or floods, and only occasionally did I hear about tornadoes. Tornadoes generally only affect very small areas at a time, like neighborhoods rather than cities. It's just if there is one it will destroy everything in that small area. But as Gardener said they can happen in many places.

Of your list I vote Wisconsin. Never been there but it's close enough. I like cold. Cold is good, seasons are good. All the evil critters that haunt your nightmares and infest your home and destroy your property are killed by cold.

It gets cold, it gets hot, but seasonal changes add a lot of cultural value to life to me. The year goes by fast, remains interesting, and always gives you something to look forward to in another 3 months. It keeps your wardrobe fresh and varied, and provides diverse activities for kids as well. Seasons keep my life organized and on schedule. In the deep south it was summer for 12 months and for 3 of those months it was more oppressing than a northern winter. Nobody goes outside when it's that hot because you'll literally die. To me it is just a more proper order of things if summer is when you go outside and winter is when you stay inside, and not vice versa.

I strongly considered Idaho. On paper it is the best for what I wanted. But a few things drove me away.

1.The culture. Even though there are a lot of Trads, my travels in the military over the past 2 years have shown me that even Trads vary a lot culturally and often there is a bit of a geographic influence. I'm from the midwest. Idaho conservatives are not the same as midwest conservatives. Many of our fathers escaped poverty by fleeing the fields and working in factories. That's part of why I put much energy into defending the industrial revolution on this forum in the past. Time, law, and structure are generally more mportant to us than on the west coast, but we're not east coast impatient/rude/self absorbed. I like to think of us as being a happy medium (of course it's what I'm used to). Midwesterners will leave you alone if you leave them alone, unlike the south where everybody annoyingly pesters you. But if you actually want to talk to someone and you approach them they will be friendly and genuinely interested in holding a conversation, unlike the west coast where they just want you to leave them the heck alone, or the east coast where they might be rude.

Idaho is as relaxed as the west coast, but conservative/libertarian. It's a unique mix and not a bad thing, it's just not for me.

You can find plenty of cheap land in midwestern states (I include wisconsin in the midwest), and despite the population sizes the states are still predominately farm land. But all the people live in the cities or suburbs. Most Trads in the midwest I gather are suburban middle class people. I think of them as being normal people. Less likely to be eccentric and paranoid. Many do live in the country as well but even those ones generally originated in the suburbs. I actually like that even if you live in the country, you're never too far from the city. The trads I've met in the south, no offense to anyone here, are just.. different, to me.

2. Mormons. I could be wrong, but I think it is a Mormon majority state. And it's not just Boise. I had a classmate in professional school who was a mormon from CDA, whose mormon wife was also from CDA. They are extremely nice people, they were some of my best buds in professional school and were moral people. I'd have no problem with my kids having mormon friends. But I don't want to live in a state where they are found in such significant numbers. I consider their faith threatening to ours, and I hate that they go on mission primarily in former Catholic countries. I never met a mormon in the midwest until I started professional school. Nor a muslim until college in the city. Unfortunately midwestern cities have a ton of those.

3. Air quality. You'd think mountain air would be great but it's actually not. It tends not to circulate. The wind in the midwest is a blessing. There is a paper mill in northern Idaho and you can apparently smell it all the time depending on where exactly you live because the air just sits there, trapped in the mountains.

And if yellowstone ever blows you'll be totally safe in Wisconsin. Currents from the rockies will blanket everything west of the mississippi.

I know, tremendously biased and racist against other regions of the US. ;D All in good fun.

A lot of it is legitimate personal preference. The nice thing is you have options.
Title: Re: Bad week for El Presidente
Post by: Lambda Phage on January 03, 2019, 09:26:14 AM
I actually consider life in the middle east an improvement over the rural deep south. Granted, instead of being surrounded by fire ants that want to kill me I'm now surrounded by muslims that want to kill me. And granted, we do get shot at every once in a while.

But the fire ants were actually intelligent.
Title: Re: Bad week for El Presidente
Post by: Heinrich on January 03, 2019, 12:42:50 PM
I actually consider life in the middle east an improvement over the rural deep south. Granted, instead of being surrounded by fire ants that want to kill me I'm now surrounded by muslims that want to kill me. And granted, we do get shot at every once in a while.

But the fire ants were actually intelligent.

Greg, that you?

What everyone here, but me ;D, is overlooking is the bestest place evvuh: Kentucky! Central KY has the FSSP and Louisville has a strong diocesan TLM community. I believe the CMRI and Resistance are within the King Louis Village as well, but these would never be factors in relocation for me.

Lambda hits the nail on the head and slam dunks the delights of what makes the Midwest special, although I disagree with most of his Southland criticisms. I had an opportunity to work in central Michigan and found, to my delight, that a significant tract of land for building, hunting, hobby farming and fishing were well within reason. Not to mention the town of Hillsdale, which would have had as a caveat an hour commute for me if we decided to buy a Victorian type in town instead of rural. We could get rid of one car and Mrs. H would be able to still do her hobby businesses and walk to a possible P/T job, library on campus, coffee shop(dog friendly I would assume), etc.  However, the deciding factors against: still too far a drive to an authentic trad community: 2 hours to FSSP in South Bend, 2 hours to SSPX outside of Grand Rapids. Jackson, Michigan, where I would have worked, has a traditional community within diocesan structure.  So no Michigan as of yet.

But back to Kentucky: this is the land of my mother's birth and where many of my distance relatives live. Georgetown, KY has a solid middle class manufacturing culture, college, and the FSSP(right outside of town). She is in a right good location to Lexington for chopping, dining, recreation: Costco, niche BBQ houses, Keeneland. Also, an hour south one can find Daniel Boone National Forest. Prolly as remote a location east of Mississippi as you can find excepting northern Maine. Here is a quaint allegory for the culture of KY:

Title: Re: Bad week for El Presidente
Post by: King Wenceslas on January 03, 2019, 05:00:46 PM

And just where are the 47% going to run to? Marco Rubio? Another Bush? Pence? That is a laugh. He will make a deal with the Demoncrats in two seconds to legalize all of the illegals and keep the invasion going.
Title: Re: Bad week for El Presidente
Post by: Michael Wilson on January 03, 2019, 07:36:46 PM
I lived in Florida for 27 years; I loved it there; you accept the fact that there are fire ants, giant prehistoric Cockroaches, Alligators and Crocodiles; Pythons; Hurricanes; tropical depressions; it just seems "normal"; but the real killer at least for me, is the traffic. After living here in St. Marys and driving in Topeka, I could never go back and fight the S. Fla. Traffic again.
Title: Re: Bad week for El Presidente
Post by: Gardener on January 03, 2019, 10:16:38 PM
I lived in Florida for 27 years; I loved it there; you accept the fact that there are fire ants, giant prehistoric Cockroaches, Alligators and Crocodiles; Pythons; Hurricanes; tropical depressions; it just seems "normal"; but the real killer at least for me, is the traffic. After living here in St. Marys and driving in Topeka, I could never go back and fight the S. Fla. Traffic again.

I grew up in Florida and my wife was all worried that the heat/humidity of Oklahoma would be bothersome to me since I like the weather in CO. I found a website which shows heat/humidity/heat index over the year by zip code. Once she saw in graphical form what I grew up in, she understood why I laughed when she raised the objection.
Title: Re: Bad week for El Presidente
Post by: Lambda Phage on January 03, 2019, 11:14:00 PM
I actually consider life in the middle east an improvement over the rural deep south. Granted, instead of being surrounded by fire ants that want to kill me I'm now surrounded by muslims that want to kill me. And granted, we do get shot at every once in a while.

But the fire ants were actually intelligent.

Greg, that you?

What everyone here, but me ;D, is overlooking is the bestest place evvuh: Kentucky! Central KY has the FSSP and Louisville has a strong diocesan TLM community. I believe the CMRI and Resistance are within the King Louis Village as well, but these would never be factors in relocation for me.

Lambda hits the nail on the head and slam dunks the delights of what makes the Midwest special, although I disagree with most of his Southland criticisms. I had an opportunity to work in central Michigan and found, to my delight, that a significant tract of land for building, hunting, hobby farming and fishing were well within reason. Not to mention the town of Hillsdale, which would have had as a caveat an hour commute for me if we decided to buy a Victorian type in town instead of rural. We could get rid of one car and Mrs. H would be able to still do her hobby businesses and walk to a possible P/T job, library on campus, coffee shop(dog friendly I would assume), etc.  However, the deciding factors against: still too far a drive to an authentic trad community: 2 hours to FSSP in South Bend, 2 hours to SSPX outside of Grand Rapids. Jackson, Michigan, where I would have worked, has a traditional community within diocesan structure.  So no Michigan as of yet.

But back to Kentucky: this is the land of my mother's birth and where many of my distance relatives live. Georgetown, KY has a solid middle class manufacturing culture, college, and the FSSP(right outside of town). She is in a right good location to Lexington for chopping, dining, recreation: Costco, niche BBQ houses, Keeneland. Also, an hour south one can find Daniel Boone National Forest. Prolly as remote a location east of Mississippi as you can find excepting northern Maine. Here is a quaint allegory for the culture of KY:


Haha they don't make cartoons like that anymore.

I am trying very hard to PCS to Kentucky when I get home. Having a city named after King Louis XVI is pretty dope.

We stayed in Shepherdsville a couple times in our travels when passing through Louisville and I was quite fond of that area. Cincinnati is not too far either.

But last time I requested anything I didn't get it, so we'll see.

Edit: To be consistent I don't consider a PCS as "willingly living." I'll only be there 2 years and then I'm free.
Title: Re: Bad week for El Presidente
Post by: Gardener on January 03, 2019, 11:21:21 PM
What's your MOS? Trying to go to Knox or Campbell?
Title: Re: Bad week for El Presidente
Post by: Lambda Phage on January 04, 2019, 07:01:19 AM
I don't want to tell because there are few of me.

I'd take either.
Title: Re: Bad week for El Presidente
Post by: Gardener on January 04, 2019, 07:47:57 AM
I don't want to tell because there are few of me.

I'd take either.

An officer that actually works instead of delegating it to an NCO?

 :laugh:
Title: Re: Bad week for El Presidente
Post by: Michael Wilson on January 04, 2019, 10:08:36 AM
I lived in Florida for 27 years; I loved it there; you accept the fact that there are fire ants, giant prehistoric Cockroaches, Alligators and Crocodiles; Pythons; Hurricanes; tropical depressions; it just seems "normal"; but the real killer at least for me, is the traffic. After living here in St. Marys and driving in Topeka, I could never go back and fight the S. Fla. Traffic again.

I grew up in Florida and my wife was all worried that the heat/humidity of Oklahoma would be bothersome to me since I like the weather in CO. I found a website which shows heat/humidity/heat index over the year by zip code. Once she saw in graphical form what I grew up in, she understood why I laughed when she raised the objection.
Re. Hot & humid:
When our family lived in El Salvador, our school year would end in the end of October, so we would vacation in Miami (Key Biscayne) in November. The weather was warm (for us), we swam in the Ocean; the locals thought we were crazy, Floridians do not go into the water after Labor Day, too cold! And the place was a paradise. When our family moved back to the U.S. We arrived in Miami International Airport on July 3; the doors from the Airport opened to the outside air, and all of a sudden we were hit in the face with this hot-humid stifling mass of air; we were dying! What in the world is this!? The first couple of Summers in Miami were real killers for us. But you get used to it (you have no choice).
Ps. We never wet swimming after Labor Day, too cold. 
Title: Re: Bad week for El Presidente
Post by: King Wenceslas on January 04, 2019, 05:59:57 PM

I see the poop storm has already started:

Quote
Democratic Rep. Rashida Tlaib fled from reporters asking about her statement that she would help Democrats "impeach the mother****er" in reference to President Trump.

"If you're unapologetic about your comments, Congresswoman, why not talk to us?" asked journalists

.@RashidaTlaib would not address her comment last night that she wants to “impeach the mother***cker” pic.twitter.com/NgEyN7znmq
— Bo Erickson (@BoKnowsNews) January 4, 2019
After her comments went viral, Tlaib doubled down, defending her remarks in a Thursday morning op-ed, and stating that she was "elected to shake up Washington, not continue the status quo."

Rashida Tlaib’s office buckles down on the “impeach the mother***ker” comments in statement: pic.twitter.com/yikr61eMK0
— Lissandra Villa (@LissandraVilla) January 4, 2019
Apparently defending herself in front of cameras is a bit too much for someone elected to shake things up.

Addressing Tlaib's comments during a Friday afternoon press conference, President Trump said "I thought her comments were disgraceful...I think she dishonored herself, and I think she dishonored her family."

President Trump on Rep. Rashida Tlaib's call to 'impeach that motherf*****': "I thought her comments were disgraceful...I think she dishonored herself, and I think she dishonored her family." pic.twitter.com/HxzZr2cF1i
— Axios (@axios) January 4, 2019

Just think two more years of this diversity. Hay Nancy how are you going to hold it together?
Title: Re: Bad week for El Presidente
Post by: Prayerful on January 04, 2019, 07:28:07 PM
That coarse, potty-mouthed Arab woman seems representative of the diverse side of US political radicalism, although unlike a certain livestreaming drinker, she doesn't pretend to have the heritage of another.
Title: Thank you, Gardener! Re: Bad week for El Presidente
Post by: Christe Eleison on January 04, 2019, 10:13:03 PM
Omaha has a military presence which we aren't keen on. In general, Nebraska doesn't have much going for it.

Blue - Institute. God bless them, but I'm not so enamored with them as to drag my family to what is effectively southern Canada. We looked at the search criteria with Latin Mass in mind, but also with day to day providing and other factors. Wisconsin was never on the list, Latin Mass notwithstanding.

Water - No problem in eastern Oklahoma. There's a reason they don't have basements, generally. A lot of rural properties have creeks, etc. We will seek a property with a well. As for water quality, eh. Anything can happen.

Texas - Despite the loud protestations in their favor, Texas sucks. My brothers live in Texas as do my parents. I'd never live there. The property taxes are insane. Property prices, for that matter, are insane. Unless they're not, and then there's a legitimate reason.

Homeschooling laws - best we have found based on my wife's comprehensive research:
Oklahoma
Idaho
Missouri
Texas
Michigan

Fracking - if James isn't concerned, I'm not concerned. The people in the industry don't seem bothered. If anyone thought they were on a geological timebomb, I'd suspect they'd get out.

Tornadoes - They occur many places. Colorado too.

Earthquakes - Stuff happens. I'm not concerned.

Climate change issues - the climate changes -- granted. I don't buy anthropomorphic climate change. I am not sure on predictions, and I'm not concerned with what may be in 30 years. A prediction, as far as climate, is hard to say. A few decades ago we were to enter another ice age. Now it's global warming. What if Yellowstone blows? Or the Pacific ring of fire goes bonkers and ash clouds throw us into a cooling period beyond whatever we may be entering? Who knows.

Oklahoma Latin Mass - In Tulsa, they have the FSSP and a Diocesan option. SSPX was there, but isn't any longer. OKC has SSPX and FSSP. If we live near Tulsa, anywhere from 20-45 minutes. I'm hesitant to take a job in Bartlesville since there are only a few employers there of any considerable measure. In the Tulsa area, I can hop to a different company with little impact on drive time. If I set roots in Bartlesville, and end up having to accept a job in Tulsa due to lack of local positions... that would suck. However, I'm willing to consider Bartlesville and drive further for Mass IF and only IF I get into a good ole boy style position where I'd have to poop on the CEO's desk to get fired.

Gardener, thank you so much for the detailed reply. I appreciate it.  :thumbsup:

You are right, I forgot to mention Missouri as a good place to homeschool. I believe that they do not require any reporting to the state.
I figured that Michigan was ok, since Carleen Diane was able to homeschool all of her children there.

Are you planning on also attending Clear Creek Abbey?
Would it be close enough?
Is it an active community of trads?  Have a lot of trad families moved there like with Idaho?


Oh, I forgot to mention, not sure if you are aware of this. But, Oklahoma has something new, that if you can prove
that you are bringing your job with you, they will give you $10,000. It is for people working remotely, and you can get
good rates on office space, if you wanted to lease an office nearby.


"Money from each grant will be distributed throughout the course of one year. Participants will receive an initial $2,500 for relocation expenses, a $500 monthly stipend and a final payout of $1,500 once the program is completed."

"By enticing young professionals to stay for at least one year, the city hopes that newcomers will decide to remain in Tulsa long term and shape the community by starting new businesses, launching non-profits or even running for political office, says Ken Levit, an executive director at the George Kaiser Family Foundation, a group that works to tackle pressing issues in the Tulsa community and is partnering with the city on this initiative."

"Tulsa Remote began accepting applications today. To be eligible, applicants must provide proof of employment, be 18 or older, work for a business that's based outside of Tulsa County, and pledge to move to and live in Tulsa for a minimum of one year."

"Tulsa joins a growing list of U.S. cities looking to attract young professionals, a list that includes: Baltimore, Maryland; St. Clair County, Michigan; and Marquette, Kansas."


https://www.cnbc.com/2018/11/13/tulsa-oklahoma-will-pay-you-10000-to-move-there-and-work-from-home.html


https://www.forbes.com/sites/laurabegleybloom/2018/11/13/this-city-will-pay-you-10000-to-move-there-and-thats-not-all/#2593d11e7001


https://www.marketwatch.com/story/this-us-city-is-paying-people-more-than-10000-just-to-move-there-2018-11-14


https://www.cbsnews.com/news/tulsa-oklahoma-will-pay-you-10000-to-move-there-but-theres-a-catch/


http://fortune.com/2018/11/14/tulsa-remote-worker-offer/



Title: Re: Bad week for El Presidente
Post by: Gardener on January 04, 2019, 10:40:06 PM
There is an active Trad community.

Clear Creek would be close enough to visit, but we wouldn't attempt to live near enough that we would treat the Abbey like a parish, cus it's not. I don't buy into the literal view of the Benedict option, so called. The monks are there to be monks, not parish priests. At any time, if it gets out of hand, Abbot Anderson could put the kibosh on its present state and be fully within his rights and duties as Abbot.

I don't have a remote position and at this point in my career am not sure I'd seek one.  As such the 10k offer wouldn't apply to me.

Title: Re: Bad week for El Presidente
Post by: Lambda Phage on January 05, 2019, 04:28:40 AM
I don't want to tell because there are few of me.

I'd take either.

An officer that actually works instead of delegating it to an NCO?

 :laugh:
Haha, oh you have no idea. Medical is not like the rest of the military, in many ways.
Title: Re: Bad week for El Presidente
Post by: Heinrich on January 05, 2019, 11:50:38 AM
I don't want to tell because there are few of me.

????
Title: Re: Bad week for El Presidente
Post by: Lambda Phage on January 05, 2019, 12:53:23 PM
Haha, sorry to disappoint but I'm like the opposite of that.

AMEDD is about as non-elite as you can get. It's like one tier below the United States Coast Guard, and one tier above the United States Postal Service... But two tiers above the Air Force.

Here in theater I don't really belong to anyone. I just fall under the regional unit.

I'm a specific type of doctor, I'll leave it at that. I get to work with a lot of other people, but the Army wants me to stay alive, so I don't get to kick down doors... I wouldn't know how to anyway. :lol:
Title: Re: Bad week for El Presidente
Post by: Gardener on January 05, 2019, 06:46:20 PM
Haha, sorry to disappoint but I'm like the opposite of that.

AMEDD is about as non-elite as you can get. It's like one tier below the United States Coast Guard, and one tier above the United States Postal Service... But two tiers above the Air Force.

Here in theater I don't really belong to anyone. I just fall under the regional unit.

I'm a specific type of doctor, I'll leave it at that. I get to work with a lot of other people, but the Army wants me to stay alive, so I don't get to kick down doors... I wouldn't know how to anyway. :lol:

Task: Kick open door
Condition: Given a closed door and a motivated soldier
Standard: Door opens

Having examined the door for signs of booby trapping and finding none:

In a violent, yet fluid, motion, engage with the leg (preferably stronger one) that would result in the hyperextension of the knee were it not for the obstacle providing resistance. Aiming for the area near the lock, ensure the foot is in a slight position of plantar flexion. Just prior to end of normal motion, rapidly meet the obstacle (door) with the combined metatarsals as padded by a vibram rubber boot sole, and engage the foot in dorsiflexion until the motion is followed through by the meeting of the obstacle with the calcaneus (again, padded by a vibram rubber boot sole) to "follow through" with the motion.

Alternatively, while wearing 3M double flange ear plugs, apply C4-plastique to key areas of the door (hinges and locks), and blow the door from its structural position. Later, fail a hearing test due to defective ear protection and an overabundance of applied C4.
Title: Thank you, Gardener. God bless!
Post by: Christe Eleison on January 06, 2019, 08:20:51 PM
There is an active Trad community.

Clear Creek would be close enough to visit, but we wouldn't attempt to live near enough that we would treat the Abbey like a parish, cus it's not. I don't buy into the literal view of the Benedict option, so called. The monks are there to be monks, not parish priests. At any time, if it gets out of hand, Abbot Anderson could put the kibosh on its present state and be fully within his rights and duties as Abbot.

I don't have a remote position and at this point in my career am not sure I'd seek one.  As such the 10k offer wouldn't apply to me.

Thanks, Gardener,  :thumbsup: I really appreciate your detailed explanations. Best of wishes to you & yours as you explore the area. It would be great if you could give us an account of your scouting visit upon your return.

Do you have an idea of how many Trad families live in the area?

God bless  :pray1: 
Title: Re: Thank you, Gardener. God bless!
Post by: Gardener on January 07, 2019, 11:24:55 AM
There is an active Trad community.

Clear Creek would be close enough to visit, but we wouldn't attempt to live near enough that we would treat the Abbey like a parish, cus it's not. I don't buy into the literal view of the Benedict option, so called. The monks are there to be monks, not parish priests. At any time, if it gets out of hand, Abbot Anderson could put the kibosh on its present state and be fully within his rights and duties as Abbot.

I don't have a remote position and at this point in my career am not sure I'd seek one.  As such the 10k offer wouldn't apply to me.

Thanks, Gardener,  :thumbsup: I really appreciate your detailed explanations. Best of wishes to you & yours as you explore the area. It would be great if you could give us an account of your scouting visit upon your return.

Do you have an idea of how many Trad families live in the area?

God bless  :pray1:

Enough to previously support an SSPX chapel, FSSP, and Diocesan TLM.

SSPX is apparently no longer there, so FSSP and Diocesan TLM.
Title: Re: Bad week for El Presidente
Post by: Archer on January 07, 2019, 01:49:36 PM
AMEDD is about as non-elite as you can get. It's like one tier below the United States Coast Guard, and one tier above the United States Postal Service... But two tiers above the Air Force.

Hey hey, was that really necessary?
Title: Re: Bad week for El Presidente
Post by: Gardener on January 07, 2019, 02:03:54 PM
A former Coastie is coming over soon to do our house blessing for Epiphany.

They do some pretty intense assignments, depending on location. Drug interdiction is no joke.
Title: Re: Bad week for El Presidente
Post by: Gardener on January 09, 2019, 02:50:00 AM
Shutdown still going.

Title: Re: Bad week for El Presidente
Post by: Archer on January 09, 2019, 10:43:02 AM
A former Coastie is coming over soon to do our house blessing for Epiphany.

They do some pretty intense assignments, depending on location. Drug interdiction is no joke.

Small service, I wonder if I know him.
Title: Re: Bad week for El Presidente
Post by: Gardener on January 10, 2019, 04:28:49 AM
A former Coastie is coming over soon to do our house blessing for Epiphany.

They do some pretty intense assignments, depending on location. Drug interdiction is no joke.

Small service, I wonder if I know him.

He was ordained in 2004, so he started seminary in 1997. I'm not sure when he left the USCG, but the latest he could have been in was 1997. Were you in, then?
Title: Re: Bad week for El Presidente
Post by: james03 on January 10, 2019, 07:27:15 PM
Quote
What everyone here, but me ;D, is overlooking is the bestest place evvuh: Kentucky!
  I used to live in Kentucky.  Nice State.  Unfortunately they are one of the worst States when it comes to public pension funding. They group with Illinois and New Jersey.   When that time bomb blows, expect huge cuts to road repair and much higher taxes.  Just google "Kentucky Pension Crisis".

Tennessee is much better off.  Well funded pensions and no State Income Tax.  Don't know about the Trad scene there, but that's a great State (land of my birth). 

On Fracking, total lie.  We've fracked probably 100,000 wells since "the scare".  I actually wrote an article on my blog pointing out that the libtards shot themselves in the foot.  In every Frack article they ALWAYS include words (sand, water, and CHEMICALS) to scare people.  We'll ignore the fact that the chemicals are the same thing as what you find in hair conditioner.  Anyhow I asked and answered the simple question, "What is the sand for?".  Answer:  to hold the fractures open.  Yes, the fractures are the width of a grain of sand.  So stack 10 Empire State buildings on top of each other.  The surface is at the top of that stack.  Down at the bottom, run a 5" pipe.  If you are lucky, extending 80 feet out from that pipe is a fractured zone with fractures the size of sand particles.  The scare was complete BS.

Oh, and two weeks later a newspaper posted an article where they changed the scare cocktail: "GRAVEL, water, and chemicals".  Yeah, try running gravel through a pump, it's hard enough pumping a sand slurry.

By the way, I find it hard to believe a newspaper reads my tiny blog.  I'm guessing one of my readers read my article and pointed it out in a comments section somewhere.  But it really did happen about 2 weeks after I wrote my article.
Title: Re: Bad week for El Presidente
Post by: Heinrich on January 10, 2019, 09:24:35 PM
You have a blog? Thanks for the reminder on the KY pension.
Title: Re: Bad week for El Presidente
Post by: Gardener on January 10, 2019, 09:55:29 PM
He’s got a website and podcast. If he sold merch I’d probably be in for a “The end is nigh, Faggots” coffee cup.

ETA: Also, a spill proof spitter with "God's Wrath Is Glorious" would definitely be on the shopping list too.

Maybe a beer coozie that says, "Subsidiarity: So easy even a self-absorbed promethean neo-Pelagian can do it"

Title: Re: Bad week for El Presidente
Post by: james03 on January 11, 2019, 12:56:00 AM
Quote
You have a blog? Thanks for the reminder on the KY pension.

Yeah, first page of my world famous book has the bonus URL.  I've been inactive for the past few months due to work and my new project.  I've been going easy on here too, but I needed a break.

Quote
He’s got a website and podcast. If he sold merch I’d probably be in for a “The end is nigh, Faggots” coffee cup.

ETA: Also, a spill proof spitter with "God's Wrath Is Glorious" would definitely be on the shopping list too.

Maybe a beer coozie that says, "Subsidiarity: So easy even a self-absorbed promethean neo-Pelagian can do it"
  I need to add a swag page.  I like the coffee cup.  I know one Brit dude who would buy one.

Title: Re: Bad week for El Presidente
Post by: Archer on January 11, 2019, 07:42:45 AM
A former Coastie is coming over soon to do our house blessing for Epiphany.

They do some pretty intense assignments, depending on location. Drug interdiction is no joke.

Small service, I wonder if I know him.

He was ordained in 2004, so he started seminary in 1997. I'm not sure when he left the USCG, but the latest he could have been in was 1997. Were you in, then?

No I joined in '05. Still, cool that he found his vocation!
Title: Re: Bad week for El Presidente
Post by: Lambda Phage on January 11, 2019, 09:16:41 AM
Quote
What everyone here, but me ;D, is overlooking is the bestest place evvuh: Kentucky!
  I used to live in Kentucky.  Nice State.  Unfortunately they are one of the worst States when it comes to public pension funding. They group with Illinois and New Jersey.   When that time bomb blows, expect huge cuts to road repair and much higher taxes.  Just google "Kentucky Pension Crisis".

Tennessee is much better off.

Tennessee has fire ants. Therefore I will ignore everything good that you said about Tennessee.
Title: Re: Bad week for El Presidente
Post by: Heinrich on January 11, 2019, 02:33:45 PM
He’s got a website and podcast. If he sold merch I’d probably be in for a “The end is nigh, Faggots” coffee cup.

ETA: Also, a spill proof spitter with "God's Wrath Is Glorious" would definitely be on the shopping list too.

Maybe a beer coozie that says, "Subsidiarity: So easy even a self-absorbed promethean neo-Pelagian can do it"

For a brew coozie: "Distributism: You know you want it."
Title: Re: Bad week for El Presidente
Post by: james03 on January 11, 2019, 05:56:27 PM
Quote
Tennessee has fire ants. Therefore I will ignore everything good that you said about Tennessee.
  Are you sure?  I imagine around the Memphis area you'd find them, but I find that hard to believe around Knoxville.  The winters are too cold for them.  Maybe I'm wrong.  Note if  the northern sections don't have fire ants, you still have the problem of finding a Trad chapel.
Title: Re: Bad week for El Presidente
Post by: Gardener on January 11, 2019, 08:31:00 PM
He’s got a website and podcast. If he sold merch I’d probably be in for a “The end is nigh, Faggots” coffee cup.

ETA: Also, a spill proof spitter with "God's Wrath Is Glorious" would definitely be on the shopping list too.

Maybe a beer coozie that says, "Subsidiarity: So easy even a self-absorbed promethean neo-Pelagian can do it"

For a brew coozie: "Distributism: You know you want it."

The only appropriate beer for a Distributism coozie would taste like mule piss and 40 unfarmed acres
Title: Re: Bad week for El Presidente
Post by: Lambda Phage on January 12, 2019, 07:20:54 AM
Quote
Tennessee has fire ants. Therefore I will ignore everything good that you said about Tennessee.
  Are you sure?  I imagine around the Memphis area you'd find them, but I find that hard to believe around Knoxville.  The winters are too cold for them.  Maybe I'm wrong.  Note if  the northern sections don't have fire ants, you still have the problem of finding a Trad chapel.

I'm actually not entirely sure, it was really just a just. I would wager at least the southern portion does. Maybe up to Nashville? I was affraid I'd have to deal with them if I get to go to Ft. Campbell, which is on the border of KY and TN.

If they ain't there now they probably will be in another generation.
Title: Re: Bad week for El Presidente
Post by: Heinrich on January 12, 2019, 12:54:16 PM
He’s got a website and podcast. If he sold merch I’d probably be in for a “The end is nigh, Faggots” coffee cup.

ETA: Also, a spill proof spitter with "God's Wrath Is Glorious" would definitely be on the shopping list too.

Maybe a beer coozie that says, "Subsidiarity: So easy even a self-absorbed promethean neo-Pelagian can do it"

For a brew coozie: "Distributism: You know you want it."

The only appropriate beer for a Distributism coozie would taste like mule piss and 40 unfarmed acres

Wrong. Bud Light and other Anheiser Busch products are a monolithic and globalist bully that crowds out the small, independent producer. Look to our own Belgium Brewing in CO. A clear and successful example of a Distributist model. James even unwittingly lauded another Distributive benefit in Chile's universal retirement plan. Why are you so against private property, no income tax, no socialized medicine, small family business, employee owned companies, living wages for workers, etc.? This is akin to socialism? The government owns nothing and expects nothing from a man's labor, but only taxes reasonably through consumption, i.e. sales taxes. It creates the economic environment through legislation creating the widest opportunity for ownership within cultural milieus. Look at the German system. It was so damn successful the mercantilists and usurers(incipient globalists and late stage capitalists) annihilated Fritz twice. Now he is slowly being shorn from the inside via sexual deprivation and a "refugee" phenomenon.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mittelstand
https://www.theguardian.com/business/2010/aug/15/german-growth-business-culture


Caveat per conventionem: I do not subscribe to Dr. Jones' belief that labor is the intrinsic mean to value. But his analysis here on two competing cultural systems via economics is an absolute gem of insight into what brought on the world wars and who would control the economic status quo in the world.
Title: Re: Bad week for El Presidente
Post by: james03 on January 12, 2019, 12:55:25 PM
They can't survive any kind of prolonged freeze. A couple of days below freezing and they are toast.   I seriously doubt that they can survive on the Kentucky / Tennessee border. 
Title: Re: Bad week for El Presidente
Post by: Heinrich on January 12, 2019, 12:59:27 PM
They can't survive any kind of prolonged freeze. A couple of days below freezing and they are toast.   I seriously doubt that they can survive on the Kentucky / Tennessee border.

If you aren't from there you likely won't survived on that border.
Title: Re: Bad week for El Presidente
Post by: Lambda Phage on January 12, 2019, 01:07:53 PM
What's your thought on Australia James? I just saw some guy with an accent on Youtube say that Australia's retirement system is like Chile's, and a bunch of other good stuff and things. The accent makes me think he's smart.

He says there hasn't been an economic crisis in Australia in decades, low regulation, high gdp, abundant natural resources. Says it's an improved America he says.
Title: Re: Bad week for El Presidente
Post by: james03 on January 12, 2019, 02:57:19 PM
I don't know.  The bad things I have heard:

1.  Totally run by feminists.  Even more SJW than the USA.  Maybe not as bad as the USA, but it is evidently bad.
2.  Housing boom is coming to an end.  Expect a housing bust.
3.  Greens have rammed through a lot of legislation for the global warming scam.  Parts of Australia now have black outs due to power outages during low wind days.
4.  No guns allowed, for the most part. 

Don't know about their economy.  I suspect their success is due to them being reduced to a supply colony for China (coal/ore).  I don't know anything about their retirement program.  If it is like Chile, that is a huge plus.
Title: Re: Bad week for El Presidente
Post by: Lambda Phage on January 12, 2019, 09:48:09 PM
No guns sucks. I think what would make life miserable for me is the inversion of seasons.

It should not be snowing in July. It should be snowing when Santa comes, damnit.
Title: Re: Bad week for El Presidente
Post by: Heinrich on January 12, 2019, 11:17:49 PM
No guns sucks. I think what would make life miserable for me is the inversion of seasons.

It should not be snowing in July. It should be snowing when Santa comes, damnit.

Unless yer in Colorado, son. Been stacked in graupel and sleet in July these parts. True stories.
Title: Re: Bad week for El Presidente
Post by: Gardener on January 13, 2019, 06:02:19 AM
He’s got a website and podcast. If he sold merch I’d probably be in for a “The end is nigh, Faggots” coffee cup.

ETA: Also, a spill proof spitter with "God's Wrath Is Glorious" would definitely be on the shopping list too.

Maybe a beer coozie that says, "Subsidiarity: So easy even a self-absorbed promethean neo-Pelagian can do it"

For a brew coozie: "Distributism: You know you want it."

The only appropriate beer for a Distributism coozie would taste like mule piss and 40 unfarmed acres

Wrong. Bud Light and other Anheiser Busch products are a monolithic and globalist bully that crowds out the small, independent producer. Look to our own Belgium Brewing in CO. A clear and successful example of a Distributist model. James even unwittingly lauded another Distributive benefit in Chile's universal retirement plan. Why are you so against private property, no income tax, no socialized medicine, small family business, employee owned companies, living wages for workers, etc.? This is akin to socialism? The government owns nothing and expects nothing from a man's labor, but only taxes reasonably through consumption, i.e. sales taxes. It creates the economic environment through legislation creating the widest opportunity for ownership within cultural milieus. Look at the German system. It was so damn successful the mercantilists and usurers(incipient globalists and late stage capitalists) annihilated Fritz twice. Now he is slowly being shorn from the inside via sexual deprivation and a "refugee" phenomenon.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mittelstand
https://www.theguardian.com/business/2010/aug/15/german-growth-business-culture


Caveat per conventionem: I do not subscribe to Dr. Jones' belief that labor is the intrinsic mean to value. But his analysis here on two competing cultural systems via economics is an absolute gem of insight into what brought on the world wars and who would control the economic status quo in the world.

"Distributism cannot be done to people, it has to be done by people" - Dale Ahlquist @ 09:50:
Here's the problem:

Everything Mr. Ahlquist says in the video is all lovely. But it's really nothing more than artificially stunted Capitalism and at best a philosophy that wishes to LARP as an economic system.

It's saying to business at large, "Be successful, but not too successful." It is, as I've long said, glass ceiling Capitalism. Moreover, it is necessarily a government enforced process of financial and economic planning. Why? Because who else is going to enforce property and business acquisition obstacles and success barriers? And if one doesn't advocate for those, then we are living in the Distributist end-state anyway.

If I desire to invest in a business, I'm going to look for a successful businessman. So let's say he is just much better at industry X than everyone else in his town. He's king of the castle. So I invest with him. His competitors simply can no longer compete (would this be government enforced to stop that? I'd think so, if we are being consistent) and he now owns X swath of territory. So let's say he then attracts more investment and expands. And he starts doing it even better than other competitors, offering similar products at a lower price through creative material sourcing. He's a tour de force. Is this problematic?

Should he be forced to wear a business hypoxia mask because he outruns the competition?

Where where the backstop be applied? Would the standard be in flux or hardline? If it's in flux, how do we know that someone in charge of applying that standard in government isn't being bought off by the growing business' competitors? If it's hardline, what's too successful?

There is private property and small family business, employee owned business and living wages (can we get a definition on that?) for workers; no income tax or  socialized medicine in so-called Capitalism too, if the government keeps its nose out of it.

The reason the big beer producers are successful is they produce a cheap product with enough alcohol for people to get a buzz or drunk without paying 15 dollars a 6pk. Most folks don't sit around taste testing beer and acting like they are drinking wine.

I still cannot find any coherent, cohesive argument for Distributism that actually addresses its segue into the norm and how that's done without property theft; how it's done with the necessary gumption, motivation, and success is inherently individualistic per its claims, but yet those same individuals could do those same things now. Ergo, I tend to see Distributism more as victim-mindset whining than a viable system. Nothing is stopping Distributism but the lack of distributed motivation to implement it on a small scale. The Amish do it in essence, but they have a community in which to do so. Catholics have no real community these days. The ones which were had in the past were basically ethnic enclaves and that helped.
Title: Re: Bad week for El Presidente
Post by: Lambda Phage on January 13, 2019, 12:42:10 PM
Distributism does not and never has existed. It is ahistoric. The good things people point to and say "see there, distributism" are things brought to you by capitalism.

I advocate for the economic system which made western civilization superior to the rest of the world. The only system which achieved sustained economic growth, created wealth, and lifted more people out of poverty than anything else known to man. Whatever that was at one point in time, it naturally evolved over the course of history, without planning, without revolt, without referendum, into what can only be described as capitalism.

Bernie Sanders often said "We are the richest nation in the history of the world." Doesn't anyone care to know how we ended up that way? Many are they who seek to kill the goose that laid the golden egg.

It is capitalism, not distributism, that has its roots in the commercial revolution of the middle ages. It is capitalism, not distributism, whose early form can be seen working in the Italian city states of the high middle ages, the Dutch Republic in the late middle ages, and the British Empire of the early modern era, all the premier economic powerhouses of their respective eras.

Go back further, Rodney Stark has argued capitalism was born in the monasteries of the dark ages. And we can now even speak intelligibly of the Roman market economy (https://www.amazon.com/Economy-Princeton-Economic-History-Western/dp/0691177945).

Like it or not, capitalism is the economy of western civilization. The sooner Catholics come to terms with that the sooner all will realize that the left truly hates everything about western civilization. You will more fully appreciate the depths of their evil when you realize they are your enemy in all things and you do not have common ground with them even on economics.

There is no third way between dexter and sinister.
Title: Re: Bad week for El Presidente
Post by: Lambda Phage on January 13, 2019, 01:02:41 PM
Distributism, on the other hand, was born in the minds of 20th century idealists. Remarkable Catholics, though not an insignificant number were former socialists.

"It is my experience that the sort of man who does really become a Distributist is exactly the sort of man who has been a Socialist ... Mr Belloc himself had been a Socialist; my brother had been a Socialist; I had been a Socialist." -G.K. Chesterton
Title: Re: Bad week for El Presidente
Post by: Carleendiane on January 13, 2019, 03:31:29 PM
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Title: Re: Bad week for El Presidente
Post by: Heinrich on January 13, 2019, 04:39:59 PM
Lambda, capitalism is sustained by usury. The organic economic development you spoke of in the Middle Ages was Distributism, which Gardener alluded to at the end of his most previous post: Local, homogenous economies creating wealth with local labor, talent, skill, and competition. Did Italy, France, Austria, etc. create those wonderful villages(with Churches, Basilicas, Cathedrals) by outsourcing companies for cheap products used by immigrant labor at a cheaper cost?  The free market system is accomplished within a sensus Catholicus, which would modify behavior. Is it perfect? Of course not, but it is not going to foster the looting and avarice and rapaciousness we see now. Market competition does exist and natural market forces do come into play in a D. system, btw. Ultimately, Capitalism is a system that is unnatural and the flip side of communism. A jewish two-headed hydra whose ends garner souls for Hell. Yes, conceded, the capitalist champion goes to Hell fatter with more goods left behind for his kin, if he decided to have any.
Title: Re: Bad week for El Presidente
Post by: Lambda Phage on January 13, 2019, 09:49:14 PM
There is still the problem of "How do you get there?"

Distributism as you describe it seems as though it is nothing more than people behaving a certain way within a capitalist framework. But how can you force people to behave a certain way? I don't mean moral behavior, but amoral things like corporate ownership, or even property ownership. Is it not true that distributism is defined by a more widely distributed means of production?

Not everybody is fit for ownership, not everybody even wants to be an owner. Many people prefer the simple 9-5 job where they don't have to plow their own fields or run their own business. If everybody is their own boss or their own owner, who is left to fill in for the unskilled laborer? Robots? Immigrants? There are already enough people who think an entry level job is beneath them, and so those jobs go to the poor foreigner who gratefully accepts because it's better than they could have done in their own country.

It seems a democratizing force which says "more men should be leaders and owners," or even, "all men should be leaders and owners." Whereas the natural order produces only a few leaders and truly competent men.

I disagree that Distributism was the economic system in place in the middle ages. I know Hillaire Belloc thought it was, but it was not so. Where was it found? Guilds? To which an extremely few number of people were able to belong? It certainly didn't exist for the more than 90% of the populace who worked the fields. They did not own the property on which they worked. They did not own much of anything. If the common man wanted a chance at making his own fortune, his best hope was to live in a city. But many both then and now were and are content to remain humble.