Suscipe Domine Traditional Catholic Forum

The Shrine => The Bookstore => Topic started by: jovan66102 on July 24, 2015, 04:39:20 AM

Title: Song at the Scaffold
Post by: jovan66102 on July 24, 2015, 04:39:20 AM
I've just finished 'Song at the Scaffold', by Gertrude von Le Fort, about Blessed Therese of St Augustine and her Companions, the Martyrs of Compiègne, Feast Day, 17 July (the day after the Feast of Our Lady of Mount Carmel, whose Order they belonged to).

I've been intending to read it for over 30 years, ever since I became a Carmelite Tertiary, just never got around to it! Has anyone else read it?
Title: Re: Song at the Scaffold
Post by: OCLittleFlower on July 24, 2015, 04:47:04 AM
I have a copy -- our women's society book club read it while I was out of the US.  I meant to read it, but it didn't make it into my luggage.   :(

Maybe I should pick it up again and give it a try.   :)
Title: Re: Song at the Scaffold
Post by: jovan66102 on July 24, 2015, 05:30:42 AM
I thought it was absolutely excellent! I highly recommend reading it.
Title: Re: Song at the Scaffold
Post by: Bernadette on July 24, 2015, 11:52:06 AM
SUCH a good book! I read it about six years ago, and remembered it ever since. :)

Edit: TAN Books has an ebook edition for $4.98: https://www.tanbooks.com/index.php/martyrs/song-at-the-scaffold.html
Title: Re: Song at the Scaffold
Post by: LausTibiChriste on July 24, 2015, 07:13:14 PM
SUCH a good book! I read it about six years ago, and remembered it ever since. :)

Edit: TAN Books has an ebook edition for $4.98: https://www.tanbooks.com/index.php/martyrs/song-at-the-scaffold.html

It seems like every time you post I'm whipping out my wallet to buy a book.


I don't know whether to thank you or scold you  ;D
Title: Re: Song at the Scaffold
Post by: Clare on July 25, 2015, 08:28:09 AM
I've just finished 'Song at the Scaffold', by Gertrude von Le Fort, about Blessed Therese of St Augustine and her Companions, the Martyrs of Compiègne, Feast Day, 17 July (the day after the Feast of Our Lady of Mount Carmel, whose Order they belonged to).

I've been intending to read it for over 30 years, ever since I became a Carmelite Tertiary, just never got around to it! Has anyone else read it?

Are you familiar with this, Jovan?

Title: Re: Song at the Scaffold
Post by: jovan66102 on July 25, 2015, 12:17:41 PM
I've just finished 'Song at the Scaffold', by Gertrude von Le Fort, about Blessed Therese of St Augustine and her Companions, the Martyrs of Compiègne, Feast Day, 17 July (the day after the Feast of Our Lady of Mount Carmel, whose Order they belonged to).

I've been intending to read it for over 30 years, ever since I became a Carmelite Tertiary, just never got around to it! Has anyone else read it?

Are you familiar with this, Jovan?


I knew it existed, but I've never heard it. And right now Youtube is screwing up, but I'll listen to it soon (I was listening to Dame Vera Lynn when it decided to get screwy). Thanks, Clare.
Title: Re: Song at the Scaffold
Post by: Jayne on July 25, 2015, 12:28:50 PM
I liked Dialogues des Carmelites better before I found out how much historical detail had been changed to make it more "dramatic".  The actual history is very moving and the fictional aspects of the opera were not necessary.
Title: Re: Song at the Scaffold
Post by: Clare on July 25, 2015, 12:30:46 PM
I liked Dialogues des Carmelites better before I found out how much historical detail had been changed to make it more "dramatic".  The actual history is very moving and the fictional aspects of the opera were not necessary.
I've not heard it all, only the piece I posted, and it always makes my eyes leak a little!
Title: Re: Song at the Scaffold
Post by: Jayne on July 25, 2015, 02:23:44 PM
I liked Dialogues des Carmelites better before I found out how much historical detail had been changed to make it more "dramatic".  The actual history is very moving and the fictional aspects of the opera were not necessary.
I've not heard it all, only the piece I posted, and it always makes my eyes leak a little!

It is beautiful, but not historically accurate.  They did sing while going to the guillotine, but it was a Psalm, not the Salve Regina.  And they went order of reverse seniority, so the Mother Superior saw all her daughters die. The opera has them going oldest to youngest.
Title: Re: Song at the Scaffold
Post by: jovan66102 on July 25, 2015, 07:42:27 PM
It is beautiful, but not historically accurate.  They did sing while going to the guillotine, but it was a Psalm, not the Salve Regina.  And they went order of reverse seniority, so the Mother Superior saw all her daughters die. The opera has them going oldest to youngest.

Actually, from what I've read, it was not a Psalm, but the the Te Deum Laudamus, which makes sense, since it is sung both at Profession and at the Renewal of Vows. And you're right, Blessed Mother Therese was the last to die. In fact, I've read that as each Sister prepared to mount the scaffold, they asked Blessed Therese, 'Mother, permission to die?' THAT is obedience! May they all pray for us!
Title: Re: Song at the Scaffold
Post by: Non Nobis on July 26, 2015, 03:13:32 AM
It is beautiful, but not historically accurate.  They did sing while going to the guillotine, but it was a Psalm, not the Salve Regina.  And they went order of reverse seniority, so the Mother Superior saw all her daughters die. The opera has them going oldest to youngest.

Actually, from what I've read, it was not a Psalm, but the the Te Deum Laudamus, which makes sense, since it is sung both at Profession and at the Renewal of Vows. And you're right, Blessed Mother Therese was the last to die. In fact, I've read that as each Sister prepared to mount the scaffold, they asked Blessed Therese, 'Mother, permission to die?' THAT is obedience! May they all pray for us!

One page in Wikipedia says:

"the community jointly renewed their vows and began to chant the Veni Creator Spiritus, the hymn sung at the ceremony for the profession of vows. They continued their singing as, one by one, they mounted the scaffold to meet their death. "

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Martyrs_of_Compi%C3%A8gne

Whatever hymn was sung, what beautiful Christian heroism!
Title: Re: Song at the Scaffold
Post by: jovan66102 on July 26, 2015, 03:19:02 AM
One page in Wikipedia says:

"the community jointly renewed their vows and began to chant the Veni Creator Spiritus, the hymn sung at the ceremony for the profession of vows. They continued their singing as, one by one, they mounted the scaffold to meet their death. "

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Martyrs_of_Compi%C3%A8gne

Whatever hymn was sung, what beautiful Christian heroism!

I read that. However, Carmelite sources say they renewed their vows at the foot of the scaffold and sang the Te Deum as they ascended the steps.
Title: Re: Song at the Scaffold
Post by: Michael Wilson on July 26, 2015, 02:57:38 PM
Anybody interested in reading the true and moving story about the Carmelites of Compeign can purchase this book; I read it and it was very good.
http://www.amazon.com/Quell-Terror-Carmelites-Compiegne-Guillotined/dp/0935216677
Quote

To Quell the Terror: The Mystery of the Vocation of the Sixteen Carmelites of Compiegne Guillotined July 17, 1794
; Paperback – November 1, 1999
by William Bush (Author)


By William Bush (Professor Emeritus of French Literature at the University of Western Ontario). Recounts the dramatic true story of the Discalced Carmelite nuns of Compiegne, martyred during the French Revolution's 'Great Terror' and known to the world through their fictional representation in Gertrud von Le Fort's Song at the Scaffold and Francis Poulenc's Dialogues of the Carmelites. Includes index and 15 photos. At the height of the French Revolution's 'Great Terror' a community of sixteen Carmelite nuns from Compiegne offered their lives to restore peace to the church and to France. Ten days after their deaths by the guillotine, Robespierre fell, and with his exectuion on the same scaffold the Reign of Terror effectively ended. Had God thus accepted and used the Carmelites' generous self-gift? Through Gertrud von Le Fort's modern novella, Song at the Scaffold, and Francis Poulenc's famed opera, Dialogues of the Carmelites, (with its libretto by Georges Bernanos), modern audiences around the world have become captivated by the mysterious destiny of these Compiegne martyrs, Blessed Teresa of St. Augustine and her companions. Now, for the first time in English, William Bush explores at length the facts behind the fictional representations, and reflects on their spiritual significance. Based on years of research, this book recounts in lively detail virtually all that is known of the life and background of each of the martyrs, as well as the troubled times in which they lived. The Compiegne Carmelites, sustained by their remarkable prioress, emerge as distinct individuals, struggling as Christians to understand and respond to an awesome calling, relying not on their own strength but on the mercy of God and the guiding hand of Providence.
Title: Re: Song at the Scaffold
Post by: jovan66102 on July 26, 2015, 03:36:03 PM
Thanks, Michael! I just ordered it.
Title: Re: Song at the Scaffold
Post by: Bernadette on July 26, 2015, 05:19:21 PM
Anybody interested in reading the true and moving story about the Carmelites of Compeign can purchase this book; I read it and it was very good.
http://www.amazon.com/Quell-Terror-Carmelites-Compiegne-Guillotined/dp/0935216677
Quote

To Quell the Terror: The Mystery of the Vocation of the Sixteen Carmelites of Compiegne Guillotined July 17, 1794
; Paperback – November 1, 1999
by William Bush (Author)


By William Bush (Professor Emeritus of French Literature at the University of Western Ontario). Recounts the dramatic true story of the Discalced Carmelite nuns of Compiegne, martyred during the French Revolution's 'Great Terror' and known to the world through their fictional representation in Gertrud von Le Fort's Song at the Scaffold and Francis Poulenc's Dialogues of the Carmelites. Includes index and 15 photos. At the height of the French Revolution's 'Great Terror' a community of sixteen Carmelite nuns from Compiegne offered their lives to restore peace to the church and to France. Ten days after their deaths by the guillotine, Robespierre fell, and with his exectuion on the same scaffold the Reign of Terror effectively ended. Had God thus accepted and used the Carmelites' generous self-gift? Through Gertrud von Le Fort's modern novella, Song at the Scaffold, and Francis Poulenc's famed opera, Dialogues of the Carmelites, (with its libretto by Georges Bernanos), modern audiences around the world have become captivated by the mysterious destiny of these Compiegne martyrs, Blessed Teresa of St. Augustine and her companions. Now, for the first time in English, William Bush explores at length the facts behind the fictional representations, and reflects on their spiritual significance. Based on years of research, this book recounts in lively detail virtually all that is known of the life and background of each of the martyrs, as well as the troubled times in which they lived. The Compiegne Carmelites, sustained by their remarkable prioress, emerge as distinct individuals, struggling as Christians to understand and respond to an awesome calling, relying not on their own strength but on the mercy of God and the guiding hand of Providence.

Both this book and The Guillotine and the Cross are on my wishlist. :)
Title: Re: Song at the Scaffold
Post by: Bernadette on July 26, 2015, 05:23:26 PM
SUCH a good book! I read it about six years ago, and remembered it ever since. :)

Edit: TAN Books has an ebook edition for $4.98: https://www.tanbooks.com/index.php/martyrs/song-at-the-scaffold.html

It seems like every time you post I'm whipping out my wallet to buy a book.


I don't know whether to thank you or scold you  ;D

 :toth:
Title: Re: Song at the Scaffold
Post by: jovan66102 on July 29, 2015, 12:02:07 AM
Anybody interested in reading the true and moving story about the Carmelites of Compeign can purchase this book; I read it and it was very good.
http://www.amazon.com/Quell-Terror-Carmelites-Compiegne-Guillotined/dp/0935216677
Quote

To Quell the Terror: The Mystery of the Vocation of the Sixteen Carmelites of Compiegne Guillotined July 17, 1794
; Paperback – November 1, 1999
by William Bush (Author)

I received it today. I was quite disappointed to find that it was written by an Eastern heretic/schismatic. Had I known that, I probably wouldn't have ordered it, but, having done so, I've started reading it.
Title: Re: Song at the Scaffold
Post by: Michael Wilson on July 29, 2015, 10:30:39 AM
Anybody interested in reading the true and moving story about the Carmelites of Compeign can purchase this book; I read it and it was very good.
http://www.amazon.com/Quell-Terror-Carmelites-Compiegne-Guillotined/dp/0935216677
Quote

To Quell the Terror: The Mystery of the Vocation of the Sixteen Carmelites of Compiegne Guillotined July 17, 1794
; Paperback – November 1, 1999
by William Bush (Author)

I received it today. I was quite disappointed to find that it was written by an Eastern heretic/schismatic. Had I known that, I probably wouldn't have ordered it, but, having done so, I've started reading it.
I'm sorry I totally forgot that fact. I tell you though that the little bit that he injects about his own views, which is very little does not at all take away from the scholarly work he has done, and the great respect he shows for these saints.  I would characterize him as an "ecumenical" orthodox type.
Title: Re: Song at the Scaffold
Post by: jovan66102 on July 31, 2015, 03:45:41 AM
I'm sorry I totally forgot that fact. I tell you though that the little bit that he injects about his own views, which is very little does not at all take away from the scholarly work he has done, and the great respect he shows for these saints.  I would characterize him as an "ecumenical" orthodox type.

Sorry I jumped you! :) I'm a bit over half way through, and I haven't noticed any problems. It would have been a large mistake not to buy it. Thanks again for telling me about it! :)
Title: Re: Song at the Scaffold
Post by: jovan66102 on July 31, 2015, 05:30:00 AM
And I stayed up to finish it (I'm a fast reader!). Thank you, again, for bringing it to my attention!
Title: Re: Song at the Scaffold
Post by: Michael Wilson on July 31, 2015, 10:38:41 AM
And I stayed up to finish it (I'm a fast reader!). Thank you, again, for bringing it to my attention!
Jovan,
 I'm really happy that you liked the book; I was afraid you would think it was a dud.