Author Topic: Polyglot Problems  (Read 2430 times)

Offline queen.saints

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Re: Polyglot Problems
« Reply #15 on: August 14, 2021, 03:10:54 PM »
I’m not a polyglot, but I find that my personality greatly changes when speaking different languages. It can be a fun experience, but also unsettling.

Can you give us an example, queen.saints?

For no good reason and against my will, in French I feel very confident and vivacious. It’s also hard for me to make good decisions, because unlike words like “bad” and “evil”, or even “good”, which resonate very deeply with me, I couldn’t care less about something being “mauvais” and don’t feel at all compelled by what is “bon”. I feel arid and cold-hearted and have a hard time being empathetic towards others.


In Spanish, I feel very shy, formal, and traditional and feel compelled to try extra hard to be good and strict with myself. I also feel very emotional and poetic and care very much for others and how they are feeling. I still feel real pain or joy thinking of different conversations with people I only knew for a short time.

In English, you can see what I’m like 😅😕
I am sorry for the times I have publicly criticized others on this forum, especially traditional Catholic religious, and any other scandalous posts and pray that no one reads or believes these false and ignorant statements.
 
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Offline Fleur-de-Lys

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Re: Polyglot Problems
« Reply #16 on: August 14, 2021, 05:50:22 PM »
I am intrigued by the question, "Does your personality change with each language?" I don't think mine does. I definitely change my tone of voice, facial expressions, and gestures. But those are just the nonverbal aspects of another language, and adopting them is part of proficiency. It might look like a dramatic transformation, especially when it occurs suddenly while switching languages, but I think the change is really just a superficial one. I think my basic attitudes and opinions remain the same across languages. But I'm curious as to whether others have a different perception. Vetus?

I think that's a common phenomenon when speaking a foreign language, especially if you get immersed into their culture. You tend to mimic those around you to a certain extent.

I don't think I adopt specific American mannerisms when speaking English but I'm definitely influenced by them.

No, you don't. Your mannerisms remain charmingly Portuguese.

However, you have a certain gravity in speaking Arabic that I don't often see in you when you're speaking other languages. Of course that could be because you primarily use it in discussions of scholarly matters.

Yes, my Arabic is strictly koranic.

There's an inescapable gravitas about it.

Yes, you order couscous like you're quoting the hadith.
 
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Offline Fleur-de-Lys

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Re: Polyglot Problems
« Reply #17 on: August 14, 2021, 06:01:32 PM »
I’m not a polyglot, but I find that my personality greatly changes when speaking different languages. It can be a fun experience, but also unsettling.

Can you give us an example, queen.saints?

For no good reason and against my will, in French I feel very confident and vivacious. It’s also hard for me to make good decisions, because unlike words like “bad” and “evil”, or even “good”, which resonate very deeply with me, I couldn’t care less about something being “mauvais” and don’t feel at all compelled by what is “bon”. I feel arid and cold-hearted and have a hard time being empathetic towards others.


In Spanish, I feel very shy, formal, and traditional and feel compelled to try extra hard to be good and strict with myself. I also feel very emotional and poetic and care very much for others and how they are feeling. I still feel real pain or joy thinking of different conversations with people I only knew for a short time.

In English, you can see what I’m like 😅😕

That's interesting, queen.saints. I wonder if this is something that is more common among learners, but gets resolved in later stages of acquisition.
 
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Offline Vetus Ordo

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Re: Polyglot Problems
« Reply #18 on: August 14, 2021, 07:28:51 PM »
I am intrigued by the question, "Does your personality change with each language?" I don't think mine does. I definitely change my tone of voice, facial expressions, and gestures. But those are just the nonverbal aspects of another language, and adopting them is part of proficiency. It might look like a dramatic transformation, especially when it occurs suddenly while switching languages, but I think the change is really just a superficial one. I think my basic attitudes and opinions remain the same across languages. But I'm curious as to whether others have a different perception. Vetus?

I think that's a common phenomenon when speaking a foreign language, especially if you get immersed into their culture. You tend to mimic those around you to a certain extent.

I don't think I adopt specific American mannerisms when speaking English but I'm definitely influenced by them.

No, you don't. Your mannerisms remain charmingly Portuguese.

However, you have a certain gravity in speaking Arabic that I don't often see in you when you're speaking other languages. Of course that could be because you primarily use it in discussions of scholarly matters.

Yes, my Arabic is strictly koranic.

There's an inescapable gravitas about it.

Yes, you order couscous like you're quoting the hadith.

You weren't supposed to unveil my expertise as a muhaddith!
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Offline Fleur-de-Lys

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Re: Polyglot Problems
« Reply #19 on: August 14, 2021, 09:24:14 PM »
I am intrigued by the question, "Does your personality change with each language?" I don't think mine does. I definitely change my tone of voice, facial expressions, and gestures. But those are just the nonverbal aspects of another language, and adopting them is part of proficiency. It might look like a dramatic transformation, especially when it occurs suddenly while switching languages, but I think the change is really just a superficial one. I think my basic attitudes and opinions remain the same across languages. But I'm curious as to whether others have a different perception. Vetus?

I think that's a common phenomenon when speaking a foreign language, especially if you get immersed into their culture. You tend to mimic those around you to a certain extent.

I don't think I adopt specific American mannerisms when speaking English but I'm definitely influenced by them.

No, you don't. Your mannerisms remain charmingly Portuguese.

However, you have a certain gravity in speaking Arabic that I don't often see in you when you're speaking other languages. Of course that could be because you primarily use it in discussions of scholarly matters.

Yes, my Arabic is strictly koranic.

There's an inescapable gravitas about it.

Yes, you order couscous like you're quoting the hadith.

You weren't supposed to unveil my expertise as a muhaddith!

Oops! I did it again.
 
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Offline MundaCorMeum

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Re: Polyglot Problems
« Reply #20 on: August 14, 2021, 09:53:26 PM »
I’m not a polyglot, but I find that my personality greatly changes when speaking different languages. It can be a fun experience, but also unsettling.

Can you give us an example, queen.saints?

For no good reason and against my will, in French I feel very confident and vivacious. It’s also hard for me to make good decisions, because unlike words like “bad” and “evil”, or even “good”, which resonate very deeply with me, I couldn’t care less about something being “mauvais” and don’t feel at all compelled by what is “bon”. I feel arid and cold-hearted and have a hard time being empathetic towards others.


In Spanish, I feel very shy, formal, and traditional and feel compelled to try extra hard to be good and strict with myself. I also feel very emotional and poetic and care very much for others and how they are feeling. I still feel real pain or joy thinking of different conversations with people I only knew for a short time.

In English, you can see what I’m like 😅😕

I think I'll translate all my posts to you to Spanish in the future  ;D :cheeseheadbeer:
 
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