Author Topic: Is the Church too "Euro-Centric"?  (Read 2672 times)

Offline james03

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Re: Is the Church too "Euro-Centric"?
« Reply #30 on: January 09, 2021, 12:00:25 PM »
Quote
I think it started with several Jews, and joined by gentiles.

What's your point?  The Church started in the Roman Empire.  That is why it is "Euro-centric". 

But I'll turn it around.  Europe, until recently, was Catholic-centric, and later, at least Christian-centric.
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Offline ralfy

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Re: Is the Church too "Euro-Centric"?
« Reply #31 on: January 10, 2021, 12:46:49 AM »

What's your point?  The Church started in the Roman Empire.  That is why it is "Euro-centric". 

But I'll turn it around.  Europe, until recently, was Catholic-centric, and later, at least Christian-centric.

The region in which Israel is located is not part of Europe.
 

Offline Miriam_M

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Re: Is the Church too "Euro-Centric"?
« Reply #32 on: January 10, 2021, 02:55:28 AM »

What's your point?  The Church started in the Roman Empire.  That is why it is "Euro-centric". 

But I'll turn it around.  Europe, until recently, was Catholic-centric, and later, at least Christian-centric.

The region in which Israel is located is not part of Europe.

But the full blossoming of Christendom --and its legacy, reach, and sustaining presence --was a European phenomenon. Europe is also where Catholicism enjoyed recognition by the secular world and cultural dominance.  It is where Catholicism developed its majority influence on society, maintaining its ascendancy for the longest period of time in its total existence to date.
 

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Re: Is the Church too "Euro-Centric"?
« Reply #33 on: January 10, 2021, 06:26:46 AM »
The Church is Universal and must always embrace all nations and all peoples everywhere. Here's a report on Nuns worldwide in different Continents within the Catholic Church. https://www.catholicworldreport.com/2011/05/12/nuns-worldwide/

"As some religious institutes collapse— according to the Annuario Pontificio, the number of Sisters of Mercy of the Americas fell by nearly 9 percent between 2006 and 2008—the surge in vocations elsewhere has led other orders, largely unknown in the United States, to assume greater importance in the life of the Church.

By far the largest women’s religious institute, with 14,665 members, is the Salesian Sisters (Daughters of Mary Help of Christians), founded in 1872 by St. John Bosco and St. Maria Mazzarello. Particularly devoted to the Holy Eucharist, the Blessed Mother, and the pope, the Salesian Sisters educate and otherwise work with youth in 92 countries. Three quarters of Salesian Sisters serve in Europe, North America, and South America, with a strong presence in Italy, Brazil, Argentina, and Spain. The institute’s membership declined by 445 between 2006 and 2008. (Not counted by the Vatican’s statistical yearbook is the Daughters of Charity, which has 19,436 sisters. They take their vows yearly and thus are not classified as a religious institute.)

Numbering 9,857, the Order of Discalced Carmelites is the second largest women’s religious institute. With convents in 70 nations, the Carmelite nuns follow in the footsteps of St. Teresa of Avila and St. John of the Cross by pursuing the contemplative life while offering prayers and penances for the Church’s missionary efforts. With the strongest presence in nations where religious vocations are on the wane—there are 81 houses in Spain, 73 in Italy, 65 in the United States, and 56 in Brazil—the ranks of the Discalced Carmelites declined by 245 between 2006 and 2008.

Founded in Cuba in 1855 by St. Anthony Mary Claret and the Venerable María Antonia París, the Claretian Missionary Sisters educate youth, engage in missionary and parish work, and serve in a wide variety of other apostolates. The 7,463 sisters work in two dozen nations—most in Central and South America—and gained a remarkable 541 members between 2006 and 2008.

Almost unknown in the United States, the Indian-based Franciscan Missionaries of Mary, founded by Blessed Mary of the Passion in 1877, number 7,050. Combining Eucharistic contemplation with missionary activity, they serve on six continents and are most active in Asia and Europe. Unlike other leading women’s religious institutes, the institute displays on its website numerous pictures of members without habits. The institute’s membership declined by 189 between 2006 and 2008.

The Franciscan Clarist Congregation, founded in 1888, is based in Kerala, the southwestern Indian state that has been the nation’s center of Catholicism since its evangelization by St. Thomas the Apostle. Canonized by Pope Benedict in 2008, St. Alphonsa of the Immaculate Conception (1910-46)—a Franciscan Clarist, and the nation’s first canonized saint—combined the spirituality of St. Francis with that of the Easternrite Syro-Malabar Catholic Church. The congregation, which serves the elderly, orphans, lepers, AIDS patients, and others in need, has 6,984 members—a gain of 62 between 2006 and 2008.

The Congregation of the Mother of Carmel is another Indian religious institute largely unknown in the West. Founded in 1866 by Blessed Kuriakose Elias Chavara, the congregation is the Syro-Malabar Catholic Church’s first women’s institute. These active Carmelite sisters work in 500 schools and run 18 hospitals; their membership increased by 29 between 2006 and 2008 to 6,428."
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Offline ralfy

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Re: Is the Church too "Euro-Centric"?
« Reply #34 on: January 12, 2021, 01:09:57 AM »

But the full blossoming of Christendom --and its legacy, reach, and sustaining presence --was a European phenomenon. Europe is also where Catholicism enjoyed recognition by the secular world and cultural dominance.  It is where Catholicism developed its majority influence on society, maintaining its ascendancy for the longest period of time in its total existence to date.

There is another "but" you missed: Christianity did not start with Europe but with a group of Jews following the Son of God who was born a Jewish man. Some of them may have spoken Greek as part of a lingua franca, but they spoke mainly Aramaic and knew Hebrew as a liturgical language. Their writings were in Greek but are part of a Bible that included Hebrew texts which allude to many other Middle Eastern cultures. And as they grew, one of the bases of European culture--the Roman Empire--tried to extinguish them, which in turn only made them stronger. Later, several European groups used it as a basis for colonizing various peoples, which included civilizing but in various cases also enslaving and abusing contrary to Catholic teaching. Finally, part of that civilizing involved combining Catholicism and various local practices.