The Church Courtyard > Ask a Traditionalist

Hypothetical situation concerning disagreeing with a priest's advice

(1/9) > >>

Jayne:
Imagine that you are the confidante of a person who has told you about a personal problem and the advice he has received from a good traditional priest about it.  Furthermore, you are aware of a (somewhat obscure) traditional Catholic teaching that the priest seems to have overlooked and therefore given advice contrary to it.  The advice from the priest is causing great emotional suffering and causing a crisis of faith.

Would you tell the person who confided in you to ignore the priest?  Would you talk directly to the priest?  Would you send an anonymous letter to the priest that contains the traditional teaching?  Something else?

Melkor:
I would tell my friend to bring it up with the priest him/herself. It really is between the soul of the person and the priest.

MundaCorMeum:
I guess it would depend on the specifics.  Are you duty bound to said confidant (like a child or spouse)?  Maybe the priest actually knows about the teaching and has good reason to advise against it, and these sufferings are good for the person.  Maybe these sufferings, while difficult to watch the person go through, will be purifying in the long run.  Is what the priest advised sinful, or just seemingly imprudent or not what you think he should've advised?

james03:

--- Quote ---I would tell my friend to bring it up with the priest him/herself. It really is between the soul of the person and the priest.

--- End quote ---

Without details, and I don't want you to divulge a private conversation, this is decent advice.  Give the info you have to your friend and let her work it out with the priest.  And leave it at that.

Jayne:

--- Quote from: Melkor on June 11, 2021, 12:24:39 PM ---I would tell my friend to bring it up with the priest him/herself. It really is between the soul of the person and the priest.

--- End quote ---

Wouldn't telling someone that the priest may not be aware of the traditional Catholic teaching that applies to the situation cause the person to lose confidence in the priest?  It seems to me that merely raising the possibility that the priest might be wrong could damage the person's relationship with the priest.  How would one avoid this?

This is a situation in which it seems like a person is in danger of leaving the Church.  It is an extremely rare situation, so it is quite possible that the priest has never encountered the traditional teaching.  I don't think it is sinful to disregard the teaching, but it seems to me that it is highly imprudent.  I completely agree with the traditional teaching.

Navigation

[0] Message Index

[#] Next page

There was an error while thanking
Thanking...
Go to full version