Author Topic: Modern Art  (Read 9451 times)

Offline Gerard

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Re: Modern Art
« Reply #30 on: August 22, 2015, 02:12:21 AM »
He probably can't appreciate something like Van Gogh because he doesn't understand how Van Gogh took the Dutch traditions and the Asian Traditions and combined them.

Sorry, what?

The very fact that he combined something makes it worthy of praise?  I'm not saying I dislike Van Gogh, but knowing what his influences are doesn't impact my assessment of whether or not his are is beautiful.

Opera rap would suck, no matter how perfect the pitch, diction, and "beat."  And yes, Jackson Pollock (Hell's wallpaper) will always be crap.

No, it's not a case of the fact that he borrowed from disparate traditions that determines the quality of the art.  But understanding and recognizing the traditions helps the viewer understand the painting itself.

Instead of some fool stating that he didn't know how to draw or that his eyes were infected with a disease that made him actually see the colors and lines of the images on the canvas, they can understand that his interest in making his painting was not hiding the brush strokes from sight and creating a photo-realistic image of a scene.  He actually wanted the lines to be seen, to have a texture and a highly decorative aspect added to the traditional Dutch interior scene or landscape. 

Someone who doesn't know what the traditions of the TLM actually mean might see some of the rites and ceremonies and dismiss them for whatever concocted reasons they come up with because they don't understand them.


You'd have to explain what you mean by "Opera rap" since I don't know if you are talking about elements of rap finding their way into opera or operatic elements finding their way into rap. 

And Jackson Pollock is crap in a similar way that Andrew Wyeth is crap.  One is highly decorative, low illustration, low expression, the other is mildly decorative, highly illustrative and low in expressive quality. 

 

Offline GeorgeT

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Re: Modern Art
« Reply #31 on: August 22, 2015, 09:34:13 AM »
Wow. Sorry, Maxy. You're out of your league on this one. Just go home.
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Offline Older Salt

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Re: Modern Art
« Reply #32 on: August 22, 2015, 09:50:28 AM »
 I wonder what Prager would think about the objective beauty, color and strong brushstroke of Jean Dufy, a French post-impressionist painter of the 20s 30s 40s and 50's?


http://image.invaluable.com/housePhotos/sothebys/97/111497/H0046-L03747101.jpg

« Last Edit: August 22, 2015, 10:19:52 AM by Older Salt »
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Offline Gerard

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Re: Modern Art
« Reply #33 on: August 22, 2015, 11:33:08 AM »
Horace Pippin was a modern primitive artist.  Primitive means he was not formally educated but more or less figured out a style for himself as he went along. 

This is one of my favorites of his.  It visually used to jump off the wall at me when I studied at the Barnes Foundation. 

The subject matter is friendly to us of course with it being our Lord and the woman at the well.  But the visual mood produced by the cool dark shadows and the soft warm colors gives it an orderly set of relationships and you get dramatic contrasts that has a smooth transition, especially in the sky in the background. 

The academics would simply dismiss it outright because the sunset is not representative of what would occur in the real world, and the figure of Jesus would be a giant compared to the well and the woman. 


 
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Offline Gerard

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Re: Modern Art
« Reply #34 on: August 22, 2015, 11:44:40 AM »
Another point that I think should be made in reply to the video in the original post, is the failure to take into account the advent of the camera. 

Prior to the camera, the artist oftentimes had the burden placed on him to accurately represent what was in front of him.  That was a constriction that the artist would usually have to work within. 

Now, often the best of the artists would still distort the images in order to make the composition more organized and set up motifs and visual patterns that would be hardly detectable on the surface. 

Once the camera came into existence, the artists of the West were suddenly freed up to allow themselves to exaggerate or minimize the details in order to better create an atmosphere and an  excitement that they were after.   Capturing the visual sensations of a moment spent on the edge of a lake or the ocean vs. a set up and posed image or a dramatic representation gave new opportunities. 
You could catch the excitement and shimmering reflections of a calm lake in the summer instead of having a scene of a stormy sea and boat caught in the curl of a giant wave about to break. 

And you also had the Museums bringing other cultures works in which they weren't concerned with realistic images but rather with making pictures telling stories with graceful lines, or decorated mosaics that lead into Iconography.   

 

Offline mikemac

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Re: Modern Art
« Reply #35 on: August 22, 2015, 02:33:24 PM »
VVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVV

oooooo&&&&&&&

^^ b

modern art  :o

I like your piece.  I can 'clearly see that it concerns a form of symbolism'.  What's it worth?
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Offline mikemac

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Re: Modern Art
« Reply #36 on: August 22, 2015, 02:38:28 PM »
Opera rap would suck, no matter how perfect the pitch, diction, and "beat."  And yes, Jackson Pollock (Hell's wallpaper) will always be crap.

Oh man, and I had to do a search for Jackson Pollock's Hell's wallpaper.

 :vomit:
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Offline Arun

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Re: Modern Art
« Reply #37 on: August 22, 2015, 08:36:54 PM »
Opera rap would suck, no matter how perfect the pitch, diction, and "beat."  And yes, Jackson Pollock (Hell's wallpaper) will always be crap.

Oh man, and I had to do a search for Jackson Pollock's Hell's wallpaper.

 :vomit:

yeah i just did too. wtf? some douchebag got paid to do that? i'm in the wrong line of work man...


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Offline Gerard

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Re: Modern Art
« Reply #38 on: August 22, 2015, 10:37:18 PM »
Opera rap would suck, no matter how perfect the pitch, diction, and "beat."  And yes, Jackson Pollock (Hell's wallpaper) will always be crap.

Oh man, and I had to do a search for Jackson Pollock's Hell's wallpaper.

 :vomit:

One of my teachers used to say about Jackson Pollock. (slight paraphrase) "He claimed to be breaking out of tradition, but our past is very hard to escape from.  He worked on big canvases, but they still happened to be squares and rectangles.  He said he was painting from the unconscious and not taking images from the visual world.  We can't verify the unconscious part of it, but we do know that drips and splashes are part of the visual world.  And if you just paint in drips, drizzles and splashes, you can probably even gain some kind of control in the technical sense.  And you can build up those drips and splashes to make a highly decorative lacey curtain effect that can be used a  good background.  That's all well and good.  The tough part comes when you explain that to someone in a gallery, turn around, hold your hand out and ask for 50 thousand dollars.  They aren't likely to be so impressed that they want to fork over that kind of dough.  So, the gallery manager starts to talk about the artist himself and the weird behaviors and references to the painting with this or that "ism" attached to it.  Well, you sell it and sell it build up the excitement and people start fighting and bidding over it.  They left the picture a long time ago, they aren't buying the art.  They are buying the stories." 

 
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