Author Topic: Trinity Sunday in the Liturgical Calendar  (Read 378 times)

Offline Jayne

  • Mary Garden
  • Major
  • ****
  • Posts: 14747
  • Thanked: 7011 times
  • Comic Sans Frontières
  • Religion: Roman Catholic
Trinity Sunday in the Liturgical Calendar
« on: May 30, 2021, 10:15:03 AM »
Today is Trinity Sunday.  Traditionally, this is the last day of the Octave of Pentecost and the end of Easter Season. This is when we switch from back to saying Angelus from saying the Regina Caeli.  The Marian antiphon at Compline changes to Salve Regina.  Starting next week, the Sundays start being numbered as "after Pentecost".

This is not how it works in the Novus Ordo.  There is no Octave for Pentecost.  Pentecost Sunday is the transition to "Ordinary Time".  The Vigil of Pentecost was changed from a day of fasting and preparation for the feast to some optional prayers that may be added to Saturday's anticipated Mass. 

This change was introduced in 1970, following the Motu Proprio, Mysterii Paschalis, released the previous year. https://www.vatican.va/content/paul-vi/en/motu_proprio/documents/hf_p-vi_motu-proprio_19690214_mysterii-paschalis.html  This document claimed that it was implementing reforms recommended by the Second Vatican Council in the Constitution on the Sacred Liturgy, Sacrosanctum Concilium putting "this Paschal Mystery in sharper focus with regard to the organization of the Proper of the Season and the Proper of the Saints as well as in the revision of the Roman Calendar."  It claimed that the calendar needed to be reformed because there were too many feastdays of Saints which were distracting the faithful from "the fundamental mysteries of our Redemption."

Given that Pentecost is a fundamental mystery of our Redemption, even according their own stated motives, the changes to Pentecost were a horrible mistake.  All of these changes served to diminish the importance given to Pentecost.  Previously, the calendar demonstrated that Pentecost was almost equal to Christmas and Easter and traditional Catholics continue this.  We prepare for Pentecost with a vigil (there is also the prayer tradition of the Novena from Ascension to Pentecost) and celebrate it for a week.  It is the point of reference for naming the rest of the liturgical year. 

Mysterii Paschalis claims:
Quote
Thus the revision of the liturgical year and the norms which follow logically from this restoration have no other purpose than to permit the faithful to communicate in a more intense way, through faith, hope and love, in "the whole mystery of Christ which she unfolds within the cycle of a year."

It is true enough that the mystery of Christ unfolds within the cycle of the year.  The liturgical days after Pentecost (like Advent, Christmastide, Eastertide, etc.) correspond to a period of salvation history. The historical days after Pentecost are the time when the Holy Spirit works through the Church to reveal Christ to the world.  This is the period when we ourselves live.  The liturgical calendar should be leading us to meditate on this subject, as it has done traditionally.  Calling this "Ordinary Time," the same name given to the time between Christmas and Lent, obscures this connection, just as liturgically diminishing the importance of Pentecost obscures its significance.  These changes do not "permit the faithful to communicate in a more intense way... the whole mystery of Christ."  On the contrary,  ​these changes decrease our understanding of our Catholic faith.

Back when I was immersed in Novus Ordo thinking, studying for my M. Div., I kept encountering the claim that Catholics had a diminished understanding of the Holy Spirit.  One of the supposed reasons for "ecumenical dialogue" was that Catholics could be enriched by the insights of our "separated brethren" in such areas.  Considering this mutilation of the liturgical calendar, Catholics should be looking to our own tradition for insights about the Holy Spirit.
« Last Edit: May 30, 2021, 10:48:34 AM by Jayne »
Jesus, meek and humble of heart, make my heart like unto Thine.
 
The following users thanked this post: Prayerful, Melkor

Offline Jayne

  • Mary Garden
  • Major
  • ****
  • Posts: 14747
  • Thanked: 7011 times
  • Comic Sans Frontières
  • Religion: Roman Catholic
Re: Trinity Sunday in the Liturgical Calendar
« Reply #1 on: May 30, 2021, 01:57:58 PM »
Here is an article, apparently from a conservative Novus Ordo perspective, with some interesting comments on this issue:  https://clarifyingcatholicism.org/2021/05/23/a-case-for-restoring-the-pentecost-octave/
Jesus, meek and humble of heart, make my heart like unto Thine.
 

Offline Insanis

  • Feldwebel
  • ***
  • Posts: 1818
  • Thanked: 1080 times
Re: Trinity Sunday in the Liturgical Calendar
« Reply #2 on: May 30, 2021, 02:48:28 PM »
Pentecost Sunday is the transition to "Ordinary Time". 

I'd like to point out, in case people reading didn't realize, that this is not "ordinary". It is ordinal, counting Sundays, not "common". The older calendar has this too, but we never call it Ordinary Time.

It is like the Usual Book.

Translations can make things sound so ordinary in English. There is a good case for keeping Latin terms for such things. Liber Usualis,  Tempus Per Annum, etc.
 
The following users thanked this post: MundaCorMeum