Is online shopping on Sunday grave matter?

Started by Hannelore, May 20, 2024, 07:27:32 AM

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Heinrich

Quote from: Bonaventure on May 21, 2024, 02:37:38 PM
Quote from: LausTibiChriste on May 21, 2024, 02:36:40 PMIs executing enemies of the state on a Sunday considered servile work?

Asking for a friend...

In Jorge's Sect, it's a sin.

Buen jugado, amigo.
Schaff Recht mir Gott und führe meine Sache gegen ein unheiliges Volk . . .   .                          
Lex Orandi, lex credendi, lex vivendi.
"Die Welt sucht nach Ehre, Ansehen, Reichtum, Vergnügen; die Heiligen aber suchen Demütigung, Verachtung, Armut, Abtötung und Buße." --Ausschnitt von der Geschichte des Lebens St. Bennos.

ChairmanJoeAintMyPrez

Quote from: Severinus on May 21, 2024, 03:44:12 PMThis is also important to preserve the moral right of teachers, researchers, designers etc. to reject work obligations on Sundays.

Even Catholic schools don't close down for All Saints Day and the Feast of the Immaculate Conception.
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queen.saints

#32
Quote from: ChairmanJoeAintMyPrez on May 22, 2024, 07:10:35 AM
Quote from: Severinus on May 21, 2024, 03:44:12 PMThis is also important to preserve the moral right of teachers, researchers, designers etc. to reject work obligations on Sundays.

Even Catholic schools don't close down for All Saints Day and the Feast of the Immaculate Conception.

The traditional Catholic ones do. I'm genuinely not sure about the Novus Ordo ones, but they might too. In a lot of countries, holy days of obligation are still retained as national holidays.
I am sorry for the times I have publicly criticized others on this forum, made statements contrary to the Catholic Faith, and any other forms of scandalous, false, or ignorant posts and pray that no one believes in or is influenced by them.

ChairmanJoeAintMyPrez

Quote from: queen.saints on May 22, 2024, 07:21:18 AM
Quote from: ChairmanJoeAintMyPrez on May 22, 2024, 07:10:35 AM
Quote from: Severinus on May 21, 2024, 03:44:12 PMThis is also important to preserve the moral right of teachers, researchers, designers etc. to reject work obligations on Sundays.

Even Catholic schools don't close down for All Saints Day and the Feast of the Immaculate Conception.

The traditional Catholic ones do.

Both of them?
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The Curt Jester

Quote from: ChairmanJoeAintMyPrez on May 22, 2024, 07:10:35 AM
Quote from: Severinus on May 21, 2024, 03:44:12 PMThis is also important to preserve the moral right of teachers, researchers, designers etc. to reject work obligations on Sundays.

Even Catholic schools don't close down for All Saints Day and the Feast of the Immaculate Conception.

My local diocese closes the schools on those days.
The royal feast was done; the King
Sought some new sport to banish care,
And to his jester cried: "Sir Fool,
Kneel now, and make for us a prayer!"

The jester doffed his cap and bells,
And stood the mocking court before;
They could not see the bitter smile
Behind the painted grin he wore.

He bowed his head, and bent his knee
Upon the Monarch's silken stool;
His pleading voice arose: "O Lord,
Be merciful to me, a fool!"

Severinus

#35
Quote from: ChairmanJoeAintMyPrez on May 22, 2024, 07:10:35 AM
Quote from: Severinus on May 21, 2024, 03:44:12 PMThis is also important to preserve the moral right of teachers, researchers, designers etc. to reject work obligations on Sundays.

Even Catholic schools don't close down for All Saints Day and the Feast of the Immaculate Conception.

I'm having trouble discerning your argument here. You're saying that because some modern Catholic schools require teachers to work on some holy days of obligation, this evidences that all so-called liberal work for pay on the sabbath, even with no necessity, is in keeping with the 3rd commandment? To you, that follows in a logical way?

ChairmanJoeAintMyPrez

Quote from: Severinus on May 22, 2024, 12:39:24 PM
Quote from: ChairmanJoeAintMyPrez on May 22, 2024, 07:10:35 AM
Quote from: Severinus on May 21, 2024, 03:44:12 PMThis is also important to preserve the moral right of teachers, researchers, designers etc. to reject work obligations on Sundays.

Even Catholic schools don't close down for All Saints Day and the Feast of the Immaculate Conception.

I'm having trouble discerning your argument here. You're saying that because some modern Catholic schools require teachers to work on some holy days of obligation, this evidences that all so-called liberal work for pay on the sabbath, even with no necessity, is in keeping with the 3rd commandment? To you, that follows in a logical way?

The point was that the moral right to reject work obligations on [all Holy Days, not just] Sunday is already not recognized.  It would be a matter of reclaiming it rather than preserving it -- a task which requires the same reevangelization of which most Catholics are already in need.
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Severinus

Quote from: ChairmanJoeAintMyPrez on May 22, 2024, 12:45:37 PM
Quote from: Severinus on May 22, 2024, 12:39:24 PM
Quote from: ChairmanJoeAintMyPrez on May 22, 2024, 07:10:35 AM
Quote from: Severinus on May 21, 2024, 03:44:12 PMThis is also important to preserve the moral right of teachers, researchers, designers etc. to reject work obligations on Sundays.

Even Catholic schools don't close down for All Saints Day and the Feast of the Immaculate Conception.

I'm having trouble discerning your argument here. You're saying that because some modern Catholic schools require teachers to work on some holy days of obligation, this evidences that all so-called liberal work for pay on the sabbath, even with no necessity, is in keeping with the 3rd commandment? To you, that follows in a logical way?

The point was that the moral right to reject work obligations on [all Holy Days, not just] Sunday is already not recognized.  It would be a matter of reclaiming it rather than preserving it -- a task which requires the same reevangelization of which most Catholics are already in need.

I resoundingly agree. I'm just left puzzled as to what you think there is to reclaim if you're sticking to the idea that unnecessary paid "liberal" work such as teaching is not contrary to the 3rd commanent.

Severinus

To extend the discussion a little, it seems to me that an old definition of "liberal" work could not apply without modification to a modern technological service economy, where the majority of the working population is employed in something that might claim "liberal" status.

For instance, Fr. Jone mentions architectural drawing.  Most such jobs are computer-based now, the workers denigratingly referred to as "CADmonkeys" because their labour is cog-like. The work is not manual labor, nor is it "liberal" - modern technology and division of labor seem to have rendered it neither liberal nor servile.

If the problem needs elaboration I can look at some of the other jobs he mentions.

ChairmanJoeAintMyPrez

Quote from: Severinus on May 22, 2024, 12:54:43 PMI resoundingly agree. I'm just left puzzled as to what you think there is to reclaim if you're sticking to the idea that unnecessary paid "liberal" work such as teaching is not contrary to the 3rd commanent.

The old manuals mention that custom may excuse Sunday labor.

Evangelization is how we revoke the idea from our custom.

Quote from: Severinus on May 22, 2024, 12:55:03 PMTo extend the discussion a little, it seems to me that an old definition of "liberal" work could not apply without modification to a modern technological service economy, where the majority of the working population is employed in something that might claim "liberal" status.

This is why we are in need of holy shepherds and theologians who will (eventually) sort out the issue in a definitive way.

But I do agree that a lot of work that might have been considered liberal in the past, if performed today by a cubicle slave, is probably an impediment to the proper relaxation necessary on Sundays and Holy Days.
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