Author Topic: High Risk of Food Shortage in the US?  (Read 2723 times)

Offline Miriam_M

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Re: High Risk of Food Shortage in the US?
« Reply #15 on: May 14, 2022, 01:48:43 PM »
We'll have to learn.

over 80 % of the US population is in urban areas which means little or no access to land which can grow food.

This is much more important than the learning issue.  The two enormous obstacles are
(1) housing design in urban America, most of which omit even balconies for gardens of any kind.
(2) the time period involved from beginning to harvestable yield.  Many people can grow veggies, even indoors, but fruits, protein, and dairy sources will be out of reach for much of urban America as our cities are currently designed.  It could become possible in future urban design, or in re-design, but it is not an instant solution for large portions of the population.
 
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Offline Vox Clara

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Re: High Risk of Food Shortage in the US?
« Reply #16 on: May 14, 2022, 02:14:38 PM »
We'll have to learn.

over 80 % of the US population is in urban areas which means little or no access to land which can grow food.

This is much more important than the learning issue.  The two enormous obstacles are
(1) housing design in urban America, most of which omit even balconies for gardens of any kind.
(2) the time period involved from beginning to harvestable yield.  Many people can grow veggies, even indoors, but fruits, protein, and dairy sources will be out of reach for much of urban America as our cities are currently designed.  It could become possible in future urban design, or in re-design, but it is not an instant solution for large portions of the population.

You can grow protein indoors. Just ask any cat lady how many you can fit in an apartment.
 
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Offline Elizabeth

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Re: High Risk of Food Shortage in the US?
« Reply #17 on: May 14, 2022, 02:15:20 PM »
We have free-range chickens so I guess we're kind of set. Growing has been tough since the weather is still not warm enough and we mostly have sandy soil. We trade our eggs for beef with the locals. And, there are some deer on our property.
How many chickens?  I am so tempted to start, and they have some cool coops on the market these days.  I would be happy to have even one as a pet to eat bugs, as long as I could keep her safe.
 
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Offline Jayne

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Re: High Risk of Food Shortage in the US?
« Reply #18 on: May 14, 2022, 02:19:02 PM »
over 80 % of the US population is in urban areas which means little or no access to land which can grow food.

This is much more important than the learning issue.  The two enormous obstacles are
(1) housing design in urban America, most of which omit even balconies for gardens of any kind.
(2) the time period involved from beginning to harvestable yield.  Many people can grow veggies, even indoors, but fruits, protein, and dairy sources will be out of reach for much of urban America as our cities are currently designed.  It could become possible in future urban design, or in re-design, but it is not an instant solution for large portions of the population.

If things became bad enough, people would need to learn to catch and eat urban protein sources, such as rats, squirrels, and pigeons.  There would probably be more resistance to eating cats, dogs, and other pets, but they are protein too.  I'm not sure how long this food source would last though.

I daresay these things do not appeal to most, but are probably more feasible than gardening in cities.
Jesus, meek and humble of heart, make my heart like unto Thine.
 
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Offline Jayne

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Re: High Risk of Food Shortage in the US?
« Reply #19 on: May 14, 2022, 02:20:52 PM »
You can grow protein indoors. Just ask any cat lady how many you can fit in an apartment.

We are on the same wave length. 

(possibly you should be concerned about this.   :) )
Jesus, meek and humble of heart, make my heart like unto Thine.
 
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Offline Jayne

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Re: High Risk of Food Shortage in the US?
« Reply #20 on: May 14, 2022, 02:39:40 PM »
I'll add the diesel shortage will hit hard.  Big input in farming and also shipping.

Present tense, not "will," according to some people I know in farming -- for them, at least.

It is not likely to help with a diesel shortage, but people should know that diesel engines can run on vegetable oil (depending on ambient temperature).  This could come in useful in an emergency.

Vegetable oil (with a few exceptions like olive oil) is extremely unhealthy for human consumption and we would be better off using it to run engines.
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Offline james03

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Re: High Risk of Food Shortage in the US?
« Reply #21 on: May 14, 2022, 02:45:06 PM »
We'll have to learn.

over 80 % of the US population is in urban areas which means little or no access to land which can grow food.

This is much more important than the learning issue.  The two enormous obstacles are
(1) housing design in urban America, most of which omit even balconies for gardens of any kind.
(2) the time period involved from beginning to harvestable yield.  Many people can grow veggies, even indoors, but fruits, protein, and dairy sources will be out of reach for much of urban America as our cities are currently designed.  It could become possible in future urban design, or in re-design, but it is not an instant solution for large portions of the population.

You can grow protein indoors. Just ask any cat lady how many you can fit in an apartment.

You're being catty.
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"All sorrow leads to the foot of the Cross.  Weep for your sins."

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Offline Kaesekopf

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Re: High Risk of Food Shortage in the US?
« Reply #22 on: May 14, 2022, 02:52:41 PM »
If things became bad enough, people would need to learn to catch and eat urban protein sources, such as rats, squirrels, and pigeons.  There would probably be more resistance to eating cats, dogs, and other pets, but they are protein too.  I'm not sure how long this food source would last though.

I daresay these things do not appeal to most, but are probably more feasible than gardening in cities.

Wie dein Sonntag, so dein Sterbetag.

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Jesus son of David, have mercy on me.
 
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Offline MushroomRooster

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Re: High Risk of Food Shortage in the US?
« Reply #23 on: May 14, 2022, 03:00:44 PM »
We have free-range chickens so I guess we're kind of set. Growing has been tough since the weather is still not warm enough and we mostly have sandy soil. We trade our eggs for beef with the locals. And, there are some deer on our property.
How many chickens?  I am so tempted to start, and they have some cool coops on the market these days.  I would be happy to have even one as a pet to eat bugs, as long as I could keep her safe.

17 hens and 3 roosters. I butchered our 4th rooster (almost a year old) a few weeks ago since the other roosters would attack him and it would create bloody fights. The meat was super tough so i recommend slow-cooking them. The hens are production types so they probably wouldn't live long. The rooster keep the hens safe and they're really nice pets. We're trying to breed the hens but it got cold suddenly, so they stopped brooding I guess.
 
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Offline Heinrich

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Re: High Risk of Food Shortage in the US?
« Reply #24 on: May 14, 2022, 03:03:20 PM »
We have free-range chickens so I guess we're kind of set. Growing has been tough since the weather is still not warm enough and we mostly have sandy soil. We trade our eggs for beef with the locals. And, there are some deer on our property.
How many chickens?  I am so tempted to start, and they have some cool coops on the market these days.  I would be happy to have even one as a pet to eat bugs, as long as I could keep her safe.


17 hens and 3 roosters. I butchered our 4th rooster (almost a year old) a few weeks ago since the other roosters would attack him and it would create bloody fights. The meat was super tough so i recommend slow-cooking them. The hens are production types so they probably wouldn't live long. The rooster keep the hens safe and they're really nice pets. We're trying to breed the hens but it got cold suddenly, so they stopped brooding I guess.

Where do you live, the Yukon?
« Last Edit: May 14, 2022, 08:00:35 PM by Heinrich »
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Offline diaduit

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Re: High Risk of Food Shortage in the US?
« Reply #25 on: May 14, 2022, 04:06:40 PM »
lol food shortage? Grow a friggn garden. My countrymen are kinda lazy.

Yes this is unrealistic.

We're growing veg for a few years now and it still only amounts to supplementing grocery shopping.  Last year we lost most of our potato crop to wire worm.  You do all that work for months and then its rubbish food.
We have chickens and they are they best, this year we are incubating eggs to rear meat chickens.  It takes months to learn what to do and what not to do.  All you need is one fox to destroy your stock, a dose of worms to make them sick or as happened me last time, I lost most of my chicks in the pipping stage. 
 
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Offline Jayne

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Re: High Risk of Food Shortage in the US?
« Reply #26 on: May 14, 2022, 04:51:22 PM »
I can't remember the last time the forum was as united on an issue as we are in saying that gardening is not a realistic solution to a food shortage.  Tennessean has made a suggestion that got all kinds of people agreeing with each other.  He should be awarded some sort of SD Peace Prize.   ;D
Jesus, meek and humble of heart, make my heart like unto Thine.
 
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Offline james03

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Re: High Risk of Food Shortage in the US?
« Reply #27 on: May 14, 2022, 04:57:21 PM »
Not to mention The Great Dog Chicken Massacre whereby you learn not to let the little ones name the chickens.

"Mommy, what's wrong with Princess?".
"But he that doth not believe, is already judged: because he believeth not in the name of the only begotten Son of God (Jn 3:18)."

"All sorrow leads to the foot of the Cross.  Weep for your sins."

"Although He should kill me, I will trust in Him"
 
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Offline Lynne

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Re: High Risk of Food Shortage in the US?
« Reply #28 on: May 14, 2022, 06:05:05 PM »
If things became bad enough, people would need to learn to catch and eat urban protein sources, such as rats, squirrels, and pigeons.  There would probably be more resistance to eating cats, dogs, and other pets, but they are protein too.  I'm not sure how long this food source would last though.

I daresay these things do not appeal to most, but are probably more feasible than gardening in cities.



Move the line one animal to the right please...
 :)
In conclusion, I can leave you with no better advice than that given after every sermon by Msgr Vincent Giammarino, who was pastor of St Michael’s Church in Atlantic City in the 1950s:

    “My dear good people: Do what you have to do, When you’re supposed to do it, The best way you can do it,   For the Love of God. Amen.”
 

Offline Lynne

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Re: High Risk of Food Shortage in the US?
« Reply #29 on: May 14, 2022, 06:07:20 PM »
Stock up now on dried beans.
In conclusion, I can leave you with no better advice than that given after every sermon by Msgr Vincent Giammarino, who was pastor of St Michael’s Church in Atlantic City in the 1950s:

    “My dear good people: Do what you have to do, When you’re supposed to do it, The best way you can do it,   For the Love of God. Amen.”
 
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