First Fridays early winter quandary

Started by Instaurare omnia, December 02, 2022, 11:50:48 AM

Previous topic - Next topic

Instaurare omnia

The First Friday liturgy is generally scheduled in the evenings. In my time zone now, it's night already at 5PM. The choice is: Drive a moderate distance through winding backcountry to my usual TLM-only and brave the risk of ice and deer (there's new roadkill daily every few miles) or make an hours' long daylight trip back to the warmer and brightly lit no-roadkill big city and easily find a diocesan TLM; stay over for the daybreak First Saturday too. If the latter, that would be the plan for several more months.
I figure I prefer the dark & winding ice & roadkill route with my usual TLM-only, even if reasonably necessary prudence might interfere with attaining those consecutive nine months. (There's white-knuckled intercessory prayer, but there's also foolish presumption.) Or wait till springtime. Or am I being a liturgical snob about it?
Nisi Dominus custodierit civitatem, frustra vigilat qui custodit eam (Psalm 126:2).
Benedicite, montes et colles, Domino: benedicite universa germinantia in terra, Domino (Daniel 3:75-76).
Put not your trust in princes: In the children of men, in whom there is no salvation (Psalm 145:2-3).

Elizabeth

St. Raphael will take care of you; go carefully to your regular Mass.  Ask St. Hubertus to keep the deer out of the way. 
xxxooo

Stubborn

My mom and us kids would say this prayer as we pulled out of the driveway. It's really a very beautiful prayer... some 6 decades later and I still say it as I pull out of the driveway. Many close calls with deer and whatever, but suffice to say, it works. 

Grant me, O Lord, a steady hand and watchful eye, that no one shall be hurt as I pass by.
Thou gavest life, I pray no act of mine may take away or mar that gift of Thine.
Shelter those dear Lord who bear my company, from the evils of fire and all calamity.
Teach me, to use my car for others need, nor miss through love of undue speed
The beauty of the world that thus I may with joy and courtesy go on my way.
St. Christopher, holy patron of travelers, protect me and lead me safely to my destiny. Amen.
Even after a long life of sin, if the Christian receives the Sacrament of the dying with the appropriate dispositions, he will go straight to heaven without having to go to purgatory. - Fr. M. Philipon; This sacrament prepares man for glory immediately, since it is given to those who are departing from this life. - St. Thomas Aquinas; It washes away the sins that remain to be atoned, and the vestiges of sin; it comforts and strengthens the soul of the sick person, arousing in him a great trust and confidence in the divine mercy. Thus strengthened, he bears the hardships and struggles of his illness more easily and resists the temptation of the devil and the heel of the deceiver more readily; and if it be advantageous to the welfare of his soul, he sometimes regains his bodily health. - Council of Trent

Greg

Just drive more slowly.  You will be fine.
Contentment is knowing that you're right. Happiness is knowing that someone else is wrong.

dymphnaw

If your boss called you to come in for an emergency night shift would you refuse?

Instaurare omnia

Quote from: dymphnaw on December 07, 2022, 10:25:42 AM
If your boss called you to come in for an emergency night shift would you refuse?
Long ago in my late 20s when NYC was a far more dangerous place even than it is now, I took the subway five times a week to arrive at a midnight-shift job supervising a 180-family homeless shelter. I didn't refuse that job, and I didn't refuse that shift. Some of the people who reported to me were the sort to be watched even more carefully than the ones living in the shelter. My guardian angel was busy back then (and continues to be, with my gratitude).

My question was about prudence. I have faith that prayer will save my own skin, if that's what God wills. It might not save my car, though, and I live in an area where, if one has no car, one is pretty much stranded even if willing to walk an hour to the nearest source of anything. Beyond that, there are others who depend on me to drive them regularly to doctors' appointments, etc., so it's not only about me. I get the metaphor, but it doesn't apply. Thanks, the same.

As for this past First Friday, based on everyone's assurances and encouragement, I decided to get ready and get going when a howling windstorm kicked up just before sunset. Should I have marched out the door and risked blowdowns too? (No shortage of those either along these roads, and 40 mph gusts can easily deflect a car just enough to cause an accident.) Seems pride plays into that as well. From what I've read as a trad newbie, there's theological precedent for deferring spiritual goods as a means of penitence and reparation too. Perhaps I'm wrong in that understanding, and if so, I welcome well-meaning and informed correction. I'll be doing my First Fridays at a full-time TLM elsewhere, the travel to which will not entail being overly presumptuous of the good Lord's beneficence.
Nisi Dominus custodierit civitatem, frustra vigilat qui custodit eam (Psalm 126:2).
Benedicite, montes et colles, Domino: benedicite universa germinantia in terra, Domino (Daniel 3:75-76).
Put not your trust in princes: In the children of men, in whom there is no salvation (Psalm 145:2-3).

Greg

I have driven around America and Russia in absolutely atrocious winter conditions, - 30C, night driving blizzard conditions.  I always found that just keeping the speed down, driving by paying attention and never driving when tired were the way to massively reduce the risk.  Saw a lot of accidents, never had one in winter.

I fell asleep at the wheel in Australia but that was summertime.  Never fallen asleep since.  Very careful driver now.
Contentment is knowing that you're right. Happiness is knowing that someone else is wrong.

Melkor

I drive a little Honda Civic in winter with no problem; just go slow and make sure you always say your prayer for the road. It's all about knowing your vehicle and it's limits.
All that is gold does not glitter, not all those who wander are lost.

"Am I not here, I who am your mother?" Mary to Juan Diego

"Let a man walk ten miles steadily on a hot summer's day along a dusty English road, and he will soon discover why beer was invented." G.K. Chesterton

"Blessed are they that hunger and thirst after justice: for they shall have their fill." Jesus Christ