Author Topic: Stages of life and their denial in the culture of death  (Read 200 times)

Offline Severinus

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Stages of life and their denial in the culture of death
« on: January 20, 2022, 01:07:11 PM »
You shall come to your grave in ripe old age, like a sheaf gathered up in its season. Job 5:26

As we know, the risk of death from covid is extremely age-stratified, with seniors being at far more risk than young and working aged people. The stratification is so pronounced that we can fairly say that the latter groups do not need any particular protection, and that all public health measures, from the most targeted to the broadest and most socially and economically disruptive, are aimed only at protecting the elderly.

Over the past two years, I have read and participated in a number of angst-filled discussions about the equal dignity of human lives, and the extent of the duty to protect the elderly. Is it really morally justified to disrupt the lives of all these young people for the sake of a very marginal average gain in the lifespan of the elderly? And isnít even that marginal gain restricted only to the quantity of bare life, while the same restrictions in fact diminish quality of life even for the elderly? I have seen, on the pro-restriction side more than the anti, the emergence of a kind of emotive moral fundamentalism on the question, as if asking for a pragmatic accounting of this trade-off is akin to wanting the elderly to die.

In protecting the lives of the elderly, Iíve noticed a strict law of diminishing returns on sacrifices made, which eventually flips over into an all-too-real and tragic counterproductivity. To substantiate the counterproductivity, we might look at the rise of drug-overdose deaths in the young, or, more to the point, to the increase in all-cause mortality among the working aged population. For much of this demographic, covid mania has made everything more difficult, more stressful, less hopeful, less successful, and more depressing. These conditions translate to a large increase in premature death and a loss of life-years that more than offsets the gains in the elderly that were bought in blood. If youíve ever wondered if vampires are real, you now have your answer.

At the core of this is not so much a question of quantitative trade-offs as one of justice, wisdom, and basic life-orientation. The flat assertion that all lives are equal, and all sacrifices to protect the elderly are thus justifiable, involves a rebellion against the natural stages of post-diluvian life, and is counter-intuitively a product of the culture of death.

Old age is a time of SENESCENCE and DEATH, of reconciliation with oneís impending and INEVITABLE DEATH, through the intensification of oneís love for God. It is that intensification that allows for the particular fruits of wisdom and remembrance that the elderly can produce for the edification of the people of God. Clinging to life at the expense of the youthful yields nothing but barrenness.

We know that death can come for anyone at any time, and that even the young must be prepared. Youth is, nevertheless, naturally a time of growth, of establishment, productivity and fertility. In this stage of life, we are driven to expand, to go out in the world, meet new people, and accomplish things. This is the flowering of life itself, a beauteous thing, but a source of untold resentment for those lost in the claws of a culture of death. The ease with which we agreed to frustrate this life stage for tens of millions of young people, the apparent obviousness and unquestionability of this decision to so many, testifies to the deepening perversity of our outlook.
« Last Edit: January 20, 2022, 01:42:44 PM by Severinus »
 
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Offline Elizabeth.2

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Re: Stages of life and their denial in the culture of death
« Reply #1 on: January 20, 2022, 07:43:17 PM »
Wait till you get old.
 
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Offline Severinus

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Re: Stages of life and their denial in the culture of death
« Reply #2 on: January 20, 2022, 08:01:24 PM »
Wait till you get old.

I'm unsure if this is meant to be a critique, or just a little poke. I would just point out that everyone who has ever lived, has died, and it is only this latest crop of the elderly - not all, but many - who think they are entitled to rebel against life's stages in this way at the expense of the young. It is not a good look.

Other than that, I guess if we are still both posting in 40 years we can circle back on this one and see if my thoughts have changed.
 

Offline lauermar

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Re: Stages of life and their denial in the culture of death
« Reply #3 on: January 20, 2022, 10:26:51 PM »
Many people like me (62) are well aware that God can call us home anytime because our bodies are wearing out. There is no need to hold back the young on our account. There is no evidence that masking, endless testing, handwashing and distancing in the general healthy public will prevent spread. However, for nursing homes and hospitals, the masks are needed because people are already very sick and vulnerable. That includes adults in their 30s and 40s, even children in hospitals.

I've been asking God for more time on earth so I can see my grandchildren and atone for sins here rather than purgatory. I promised God I would give back by offering daily prayers, adoration, Blue Army activities, and fasting. Ultimately, it's up to Him.
"I am not a pessimist. I am not an optimist. I am a realist." Father Malachi Martin (1921-1999)
 
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Offline Severinus

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Re: Stages of life and their denial in the culture of death
« Reply #4 on: January 20, 2022, 10:54:55 PM »
Many people like me (62) are well aware that God can call us home anytime because our bodies are wearing out. There is no need to hold back the young on our account.

It sounds like you understand what I'm talking about.

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There is no evidence that masking, endless testing, handwashing and distancing in the general healthy public will prevent spread.

As I tried to explain in another thread, preventing spread is not at all a desirable goal for this disease, so if there were evidence that these things prevented spread, that would just be more reason to avoid doing them (other than normal handwashing, which is basic hygiene).

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However, for nursing homes and hospitals, the masks are needed because people are already very sick and vulnerable. That includes adults in their 30s and 40s, even children in hospitals.

I think you have to be careful with these assertions as well. It's unclear whether most vulnerable people truly want to be isolated and visited only by masked strangers. The lesson from our disastrous covid response is to hew to the middle, humanistic ground rather than go overboard in trying to protect vulnerable people.
 

Offline Severinus

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Re: Stages of life and their denial in the culture of death
« Reply #5 on: January 20, 2022, 11:11:33 PM »
To put it another way, we have seen that over-medicalization of society has a dehumanizing effect. This applies primarily to the extension of hospital-style techniques into the general public, but also to over-applying these same techniques within the hospitals.
« Last Edit: January 21, 2022, 08:47:27 AM by Severinus »