Author Topic: Couple of questions about Latin  (Read 94 times)

Offline Daniel

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Couple of questions about Latin
« on: January 09, 2018, 06:07:16 PM »
1.) If a word contains a vowel followed by two i's in a row, how is this to be pronounced? For example, the place name Veii... it ends in -eii. Would this be three separate syllables (Ve-i-i) or two (Vei-i)?
I'm guessing the latter? But if that's the case, would it be ok to write the first i as a j, since it's a consonant rather than a vowel? Veji instead of Veii, since that's the way it's pronounced? Or is there any particular reason that it be written i?

2.) I notice that in Latin the verb is often implicit and subsequently omitted.
For example, consider the phrases Dominus vobiscum and Dominus tecum. Both of these sentences omit the verb and look pretty much the same (apart from one being plural and the other being singular). Yet we know that Dominus vobiscum is to be read in the subjunctive (our Lord be with you, not our Lord is with you) while Dominus tecum is to be read in the indicative (our Lord is with thee, not our Lord be with thee).
Since the verb is unwritten in both of those sentences, I am wondering how exactly we know to read former in the subjunctive but the latter in the indicative? Is this just a matter identifying the proper sense based on context?
« Last Edit: January 09, 2018, 06:26:00 PM by Daniel »
 

Offline Jayne

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Re: Couple of questions about Latin
« Reply #1 on: January 09, 2018, 06:33:25 PM »
1.) If a word contains a vowel followed by two i's in a row, how is this to be pronounced? For example, the place name Veii... it ends in -eii. Would this be three separate syllables (Ve-i-i) or two (Vei-i)?
I'm guessing the latter? But if that's the case, would it be ok to write the first i as a j, since it's a consonant rather than a vowel? Veji instead of Veii, since that's the way it's pronounced?

It looks like a diphthong -ei- followed by -i (the plural ending).  An alternate form of the name is Veius, also two syllables. (It seems to be a Latinized form of the origninal Etruscan name Vei.) Since it's a diphthong one would not replace the i with a j.

2.) I notice that in Latin the verb is often implicit and subsequently omitted.
For example, consider the phrases Dominus vobiscum and Dominus tecum. Both of these sentences omit the verb and look pretty much the same. Yet we know that Dominus vobiscum is to be read in the subjunctive (Dominus [sit] vobiscum) while Dominus tecum is to be read in the indicative (Dominus [est] tecum).
Since the verb is not written in either sentence, I am wondering how exactly we know to read former in the subjunctive but the latter in the indicative? Is this just a matter identifying the proper sense based on context?

Forms of the verb esse are often omitted and implied by context.  The distinction between Dominus vobiscum and Dominus tecum is plural and singular. Whether they are indicative or subjunctive is determined by context.
« Last Edit: January 09, 2018, 06:46:33 PM by Jayne »
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