Author Topic: Happy Birthday Lydia!  (Read 655 times)

Offline Carleendiane

  • Mary Garden
  • Major
  • ****
  • Posts: 10823
  • Thanked: 7263 times
  • all aboard the "struggle bus"
  • Religion: Traditional Catholic
Re: ...
« Reply #15 on: January 12, 2018, 07:59:02 PM »
Yes, St. Lydia is a great Saint and one who had special significance for me when I converted.  (She's my Confirmation Saint.)  It's true that she's not as well known in the Western Church as in the Eastern Church, so I'm glad that some of you are finding out about her now. (Thank you, Non!). 

To be honest, though, and since it was brought up, I kind of regret my choice of username.  I really hate the thought of things I say or question (etc.) potentially producing any kind of bad connotation with a holy Saint of the Church.  She deserves much better than what I can offer on her behalf!  I know at least one poster has changed his username in the past, and I've considered (and am still considering) asking to have mine changed as well.  So, I don't know.

 :shrug:


You regret your user name? So do I but that's another story. Purpura means bleeding under the skin. Yes it does. I would say it is entirely inappropriate for you. Yep, just sayin.
To board the struggle bus: no whining, board with a smile, a fake one will be found out and put off at next stop, no maps, no directions, going only one way, one destination. Follow all rules and you will arrive. Drop off at pearly gate. Bring nothing.
 
The following users thanked this post: Lydia Purpuraria

Offline Lydia Purpuraria

  • Mary Garden
  • Feldwebel
  • ***
  • Posts: 2637
  • Thanked: 713 times
Re: ...
« Reply #16 on: January 13, 2018, 07:18:56 AM »
Purpura means bleeding under the skin. Yes it does. I would say it is entirely inappropriate for you. Yep, just sayin.

 ;D  I did not know that, Carleen!  A few years back, there was a poster who randomly asked me if my name had anything to do with Claviceps purpurea, which has some interesting uses and associations.  But the answer to that was ... "no." (LOL)

Anyway, as far as "purpura" -- what a difference an added "ria" makes to word meaning!
« Last Edit: January 13, 2018, 08:01:04 AM by Lydia Purpuraria »
 
The following users thanked this post: Carleendiane

Offline Jayne

  • Mary Garden
  • Major
  • ****
  • Posts: 12465
  • Thanked: 4222 times
  • Comic Sans Frontières
  • Religion: Roman Catholic
Re: ...
« Reply #17 on: January 13, 2018, 09:36:55 AM »
Purpura means bleeding under the skin. Yes it does. I would say it is entirely inappropriate for you. Yep, just sayin.

 ;D  I did not know that, Carleen!  A few years back, there was a poster who randomly asked me if my name had anything to do with Claviceps purpurea, which has some interesting uses and associations.  But the answer to that was ... "no." (LOL)

Anyway, as far as "purpura" -- what a difference an added "ria" makes to word meaning!

Both the "Purpuraria" of your user name and the "purpurea" of the fungus are connected to the Latin word purpura.  When Lydia is first described in the book of Acts the phrase is mulier nomine Lydia purpuraria - "a woman named Lydia, a seller of purple (dye)".  (This dye was an expensive luxury item, so the implication is that Lydia was financially well to do.) The word purpura originally meant both the dye and the shellfish it was derived from.  The meaning expanded to include the colour, cloth dyed with it, and as a figurative expression referring to the kings and magistrates who would wear such cloth. Our word "purple" is derived from it. The suffix "aria" means "connected with, pertaining to; a person engaged in".

The fungus claviceps purpurea is a dark purple colour and is also called "purple ergot".  The suffix ea makes the noun purpura into a (feminine, singular, nominative) adjective.

So, in terms of etymology, your username does have something to do with the fungus.  If anyone ever asks you again, you can say yes.  It is also connected to the medical condition purpura, which is characterized by purple blotches on the skin.

Also, as far as I can tell, you have not brought any dishonour to St. Lydia by taking her name as your username.  You are a positive presence on this forum.
« Last Edit: January 13, 2018, 09:39:46 AM by Jayne »
Jesus, meek and humble of heart, make my heart like unto Thine.
 
The following users thanked this post: Lydia Purpuraria, Carleendiane

Offline Carleendiane

  • Mary Garden
  • Major
  • ****
  • Posts: 10823
  • Thanked: 7263 times
  • all aboard the "struggle bus"
  • Religion: Traditional Catholic
Re: ...
« Reply #18 on: January 13, 2018, 10:18:12 AM »
Purpura means bleeding under the skin. Yes it does. I would say it is entirely inappropriate for you. Yep, just sayin.

 ;D  I did not know that, Carleen!  A few years back, there was a poster who randomly asked me if my name had anything to do with Claviceps purpurea, which has some interesting uses and associations.  But the answer to that was ... "no." (LOL)

Anyway, as far as "purpura" -- what a difference an added "ria" makes to word meaning!

Both the "Purpuraria" of your user name and the "purpurea" of the fungus are connected to the Latin word purpura.  When Lydia is first described in the book of Acts the phrase is mulier nomine Lydia purpuraria - "a woman named Lydia, a seller of purple (dye)".  (This dye was an expensive luxury item, so the implication is that Lydia was financially well to do.) The word purpura originally meant both the dye and the shellfish it was derived from.  The meaning expanded to include the colour, cloth dyed with it, and as a figurative expression referring to the kings and magistrates who would wear such cloth. Our word "purple" is derived from it. The suffix "aria" means "connected with, pertaining to; a person engaged in".

The fungus claviceps purpurea is a dark purple colour and is also called "purple ergot".  The suffix ea makes the noun purpura into a (feminine, singular, nominative) adjective.

So, in terms of etymology, your username does have something to do with the fungus.  If anyone ever asks you again, you can say yes.  It is also connected to the medical condition purpura, which is characterized by purple blotches on the skin.

Also, as far as I can tell, you have not brought any dishonour to St. Lydia by taking her name as your username.  You are a positive presence on this forum.

Yes, thank you Jayne. I love purple and I love Lydia, so I enjoyed reading this.

What it was that prompted me to bring up the bleed thing is my daughter when 8 had Heinrich Shoenline Purpura. She was bleeding steadily through out her body, leaking blood. Found in everything from tears, stomach, urine everywhere. Took a month and half to figure out what was wrong before they knew how to treat her. We were blamed for causing her so much stress that it made her body do this. She could not eat without throwing up, so she was fed intraveiniously. She was intubated and they washed her stomach inside with a cold saline solution for days at a time. The disease would have been diagnosed much earlier had her symptoms followed the textbook pattern, which presents with purple dots under the skin, mostly on legs and arms. Her purple markings appeared much much later. She was skeletal before they got her on the cure, steriods.

I had a new baby at the time and was told not to bring my baby up to hosp. So dad spent a lot of time at her bedside. That was a long 6 weeks. She made her first communion in hosp. This is what I think of. I would rather think of purple. Yes, purple is lovely and Lydia, you deserve to wear it. Such a pleasant, cheerful, poster.
« Last Edit: January 13, 2018, 10:42:36 AM by Carleendiane »
To board the struggle bus: no whining, board with a smile, a fake one will be found out and put off at next stop, no maps, no directions, going only one way, one destination. Follow all rules and you will arrive. Drop off at pearly gate. Bring nothing.
 
The following users thanked this post: Jayne, Lydia Purpuraria

Offline Lydia Purpuraria

  • Mary Garden
  • Feldwebel
  • ***
  • Posts: 2637
  • Thanked: 713 times
Re: ...
« Reply #19 on: January 13, 2018, 10:35:50 AM »
Both the "Purpuraria" of your user name and the "purpurea" of the fungus are connected to the Latin word purpura.  When Lydia is first described in the book of Acts the phrase is mulier nomine Lydia purpuraria - "a woman named Lydia, a seller of purple (dye)".  (This dye was an expensive luxury item, so the implication is that Lydia was financially well to do.) The word purpura originally meant both the dye and the shellfish it was derived from.  The meaning expanded to include the colour, cloth dyed with it, and as a figurative expression referring to the kings and magistrates who would wear such cloth. Our word "purple" is derived from it. The suffix "aria" means "connected with, pertaining to; a person engaged in".

The fungus claviceps purpurea is a dark purple colour and is also called "purple ergot".  The suffix ea makes the noun purpura into a (feminine, singular, nominative) adjective.

So, in terms of etymology, your username does have something to do with the fungus.  If anyone ever asks you again, you can say yes.  It is also connected to the medical condition purpura, which is characterized by purple blotches on the skin.

Also, as far as I can tell, you have not brought any dishonour to St. Lydia by taking her name as your username.  You are a positive presence on this forum.

I knew about the meaning of "purpuraria" and the color purple (etc.) and how / why it's used in conjunction with St. Lydia; but was not familiar with the condition called purpura (and some of the other etymological information you gave).  So thank you, Jayne (and Carleen).  Very interesting.

Now I could be wrong, and the poster is no longer here to clarify, but when he asked me about the Claviceps purpurea and my username ... I'm pretty sure he was wondering about it from the standpoint of LSD being something that's derived from it.  And so I answered no (after looking it up and realizing then the connection)  -- since it was after the saint and had not a thing to do with LSD.  (But you make a good point that in strictly etymological terms, it actually does have something of a connection, so I actually could have answered yes!)  LOL

(Thank you for the kind words, Jayne and Carleen.) 
« Last Edit: January 13, 2018, 04:00:30 PM by Lydia Purpuraria »
 

Offline Lydia Purpuraria

  • Mary Garden
  • Feldwebel
  • ***
  • Posts: 2637
  • Thanked: 713 times
Re: ...
« Reply #20 on: January 13, 2018, 10:51:42 AM »
What it was that prompted me to bring up the bleed thing is my daughter when 8 had Heinrich Shoenline Purpura. She was bleeding steadily through out her body, leaking blood. Found in everything from tears, stomach, urine everywhere. Took a month and half to figure out what was wrong before they knew how to treat her. We were blamed for causing her so much stress that it made her body do this. She could not eat without throwing up, so she was fed intraveiniously. She was intubated and they washed her stomach inside with a cold saline solution for days at a time. The disease would have been diagnosed much earlier had her symptoms followed the textbook pattern, which presents with purple dots under the skin, mostly on legs and arms. Her purple markings appeared much much later. She was skeletal before they got her on the cure, steriods.

I had a new baby at the time and was told not to bring my baby up to hosp. So dad spent a lot of time at her bedside. That was a long 6 weeks. She made her first communion in hosp. This is what I think of. I would rather think of purple. Yes, purple is lovely and Lydia, you deserve to wear it. Such a pleasant, cheerful, poster.

Wow.  That's horrible!  Poor thing.  That must have been so scary for all of you before figuring out what was going on.  And having such a young baby to care for at the same time and not being able to be with her yourself as much as I'm sure you wanted to be.  :( But it was steroids that did the trick!  (Thank goodness.)  I'd never heard of this condition until now, I'm sorry you had to have firsthand experience with it.  Yes, thinking of purple seems much better indeed.  And, it's a great color.

 
The following users thanked this post: Jayne, Carleendiane

Offline PerEvangelicaDicta

  • Mary Garden
  • Wachtmeister
  • ***
  • Posts: 1390
  • Thanked: 1232 times
  • Religion: Catholic
Re: Happy Birthday Lydia!
« Reply #21 on: January 19, 2018, 04:10:00 PM »
Deo gratias God is timeless....  belated but heartfelt prayers for you both, dearest Lydia and Dymphna.
They shall not be confounded in the evil time; and in the days of famine they shall be filled
Psalms 36:19
 
The following users thanked this post: dymphna17, Lydia Purpuraria