Author Topic: Hockey Question  (Read 263 times)

Offline red solo cup

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Hockey Question
« on: September 13, 2021, 03:19:20 PM »
I have a buddy who loves putting people on. He played hockey in High School and claims they used a lead puck in practice to build up arm and wrist strength. I doubt this. Is he putting me on? Couldn't find anything on Google.  Any hockey players have the answer? Canadians?
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Offline Optatus

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Re: Hockey Question
« Reply #1 on: September 13, 2021, 03:34:50 PM »
Weighted pucks are pretty common for practicing stickhandling, even for kids. Look up "green biscuit puck".
 
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Offline red solo cup

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Re: Hockey Question
« Reply #2 on: September 14, 2021, 06:22:47 AM »
I took a look at this. Is says it's for practice on rough surfaces but there's no mention of it being weighted.
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Offline Christina_S

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Re: Hockey Question
« Reply #3 on: September 14, 2021, 09:04:20 AM »
From Wikipedia:
Quote
There are several variations on the standard black, 6-ounce (170 g) hockey puck. One of the most common is a blue, 4-ounce (110 g) puck that is used for training younger players who are not yet able to use a standard puck. Heavier 10-ounce (280 g) training pucks, typically reddish pink or reddish orange in colour, are also available for players looking to develop the strength of their shots or improve their stick handling skills. Players looking to increase wrist strength often practice with steel pucks that weigh 2 pounds (910 g); these pucks are not used for shooting, as they could seriously harm other players. White pucks are used for goaltender practice. These are regulation size and weight, but made from white rubber. A hollow, light-weight fluorescent orange puck is available for road or floor hockey. Other variants, some with plastic ball-bearings or glides, are available for use for road or roller hockey.
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Offline LausTibiChriste

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Re: Hockey Question
« Reply #4 on: September 17, 2021, 08:52:46 PM »
We used weighted pucks and weighted sticks in practice all the time. May not have been lead tho. Parachutes for speed skating too.
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