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Marian Devotional Movement - a history

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mikemac:
1. The Priest, a Chief and their Mother

//www.youtube.com/watch?v=9_34lofX368

2. Darkness before Light

//www.youtube.com/watch?v=B8BpUhwGmb8

3. A Pig in the Chapel

//www.youtube.com/watch?v=pbsyjwQux-c

4. One Man's Vow

//www.youtube.com/watch?v=QRL49EU0bbA

5. The Bridge of Rosaries

//www.youtube.com/watch?v=c4TeOm72giM

6. Twin Souls

//www.youtube.com/watch?v=1v2NOcWNIts

7. She Opened their Eyes

//www.youtube.com/watch?v=KtcT9mykfWM

8. A Queen is Crowned

//www.youtube.com/watch?v=lcJci1q81Js

The Pilgrim Statue of Our Lady of the Cape

//www.youtube.com/watch?v=e88lR_WBTq0

Recipe for Renewal

//www.youtube.com/watch?v=wiEch2IMB6E

What is the Confraternity of the Most Holy Rosary?

//www.youtube.com/watch?v=ah7yRfqTtLU

The origins of Trois-Rivières (1635) and Cap-de-la-Madeleine (1651) can't be mentioned without including the Holy Rosary and the Jesuits in their history.  From pre Revolutionary France to the Cape in New France comes one of the oldest Marian Rosary Confraternities in Canada (1694), granted by the worldwide confraternity entrusted to the Dominicans.  This Rosary Confraternity is not just for Canadians.  If you look at the map on the enrollment page below you'll see there are lots of members from the US, Canada, Ireland, the UK, France, India and all around the world.  The only requirements are to sign your name and promise to say the Rosary once  per week.  Your intentions are joined with all the members.

https://visitationproject.org/collections/rosary-confraternity-enrollment-confraternity-of-the-most-holy-rosary

drummerboy:
Isn't there only one Rosary Confraternity?  I enrolled with this one: https://www.rosarycenter.org/

mikemac:

--- Quote from: drummerboy on March 16, 2021, 01:06:08 AM ---Isn't there only one Rosary Confraternity?  I enrolled with this one: https://www.rosarycenter.org/

--- End quote ---

I think they are all the same Rosary Confraternity, just different chapters.  I know the Jesuits at the Cape applied and were granted the confraternity in 1694 by the worldwide confraternity entrusted to the Dominicans.  So the Dominicans oversee the worldwide confraternity.  I see from the link that you posted it is run by Dominicans.  But it wouldn't be where the Jesuits applied to in 1694 because the site that you posted says "The Province of the Most Holy Name of Jesus, commonly referred to as the “Western Dominican Province,” was founded in 1850 during the California Gold Rush."  It looks like two different chapters of the same Rosary Confraternity.  The way I understood it is in 1694 the Jesuits at the Cape applied to the Dominicans in France; the one video mentions this when referring to the application that was granted "From pre Revolutionary France to the Cape in New France". 

Lynne:

--- Quote from: drummerboy on March 16, 2021, 01:06:08 AM ---Isn't there only one Rosary Confraternity?  I enrolled with this one: https://www.rosarycenter.org/

--- End quote ---

I joined the Confraternity run by the Dominicans in Eastern US. They don't require that one says the Luminous (aka Illuminati  ::) ) Mysteries.

ETA:
I checked the website that Drummerboy posted and they no longer imply that the Luminous mysteries must be said. That's a good thing!

mikemac:
I just realized that Father Jacques Buteux, the founder of Cap-de-la-Madeleine could almost be recognized as one of the Jesuit North American Martyrs.  The first video in the series above talks about Father Buteux's good relations he had with the natives north of Trois-Rivières along the Saint Maurice River before his cruel death in 1652.  The video doesn't talk about how Father Buteux died though.  This Jacques Buteux Wikipedia page does though.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jacques_Buteux


--- Quote ---...
Buteux arrived in Quebec on 24 June 1634 and his superior, Father Paul Le Jeune assigned him to the trading post at Trois-Rivières, under command of the Sieur de Laviolette. The post was still under construction when he arrived on 8 Sept. 1634. Trois-Rivières was favored at that time by the Montagnais, Algonquin and Huron as a location for trading with the French.[1] As the congregation grew there had to be a separate Mass in French, as the small chapel could not hold everyone. In 1641 Jean de Quen and Joseph Poncet were sent to assist him.[3]

... On April 4, 1651, [should read 1652] Father Buteux left to go serve the mission of Saint-Pierre, north of Three Rivers, accompanied by a young Frenchman and a young Huron. The three were ambushed by a party of Iroquois, who seized the Huron. Father Buteux fell, struck by two bullets in the chest. A third musket ball shattered his right arm. A young French soldier, Pierre Fontarabie, was also killed. Their bodies were thrown into the St. Maurice River. The Huron, Tsondoutannen, managed to escape and brought word back to Trois-Rivières.

Father Buteux had left letters and many documents in the parish registers giving historians a good profile of his time in Canada.
--- End quote ---

Comparing the year Father Buteux was murdered and who he was murdered by to these quotes from this Wikipedia page on the Canadian Martyrs there is a clear resemblance.  He was a Jesuit, like the Canadian Martyrs.  Father Buteux wasn't ritually tortured, but he was killed while he was spreading the Word to the friendly natives along the St. Maurice River.  He was murdered by the Iroquois, same as the Canadian Martyrs and Father Buteux's death was just three years after the last Canadian Martyr died.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canadian_Martyrs


--- Quote ---The Canadian Martyrs, also known as the North American Martyrs (French: Saints martyrs canadiens, Holy Canadian Martyrs), were eight Jesuit missionaries from Sainte-Marie among the Hurons. They were ritually tortured and killed on various dates in the mid-17th century in Canada, in what is now southern Ontario, and in upstate New York, during the warfare between the Iroquois (particularly the Mohawk people) and the Huron. They have subsequently been canonized and venerated as martyrs by the Catholic Church.

The martyrs are St. René Goupil (1642),[1] St. Isaac Jogues (1646),[2] St. Jean de Lalande (1646),[3] St. Antoine Daniel (1648),[4] St. Jean de Brébeuf (1649),[5] St. Noël Chabanel (1649),[6] St. Charles Garnier (1649),[6] and St. Gabriel Lalemant (1649).[5]
--- End quote ---

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