Author Topic: What do you think about Nietzsche's critique on Judeo-Christian moral values??  (Read 868 times)

Offline Pon de Replay

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Fortunately there is no dogmatic reading of Nietzsche.  He would have been disappointed if there were.  Yukio Mishima and Gabriele D'Annunzio are his two most striking and compelling descendants, I would say.  Presently I am keen on his Japanese reception and his influence on its literature, but have not read anything beyond Mishima there.   One book I would like to read on the subject is an anthology, Nietzsche and Asian Thought.  Does he have a worthy heir among philosophers?  Perhaps he sufficiently outdid all others.

There is of course the frequently recurring Nordic and Scandinavian aesthetic in his writings, something which I don't think has been sufficiently paid homage too—the Nazis were too literal and fanatical to the point of being a caricature.  The Hungarian director Bela Tarr made a movie called The Turin Horse, which stands as a curious and compelling exploration of his gloomier and more apocalyptic aspects.  Artistically, though, it seems that those who draw too directly and heavily from Nietzsche are doomed to pridefulness and self-parody.  “One repays a teacher badly if one always remains nothing but a pupil.”  It's better to be careful and conservative in one's borrowing.  There's only one Nietzsche, and you are not he.
"The sneakiness of prigs, the conventicle secrecy, gloomy concepts like hell, like sacrifice of the guiltless, like unio mystica in drinking blood; above all, the slowly fanned fire of revenge, of chandala revenge—all that is what became master over Rome."

Rome sank to whoredom and became a stew
The Caesars became beasts, and God—a Jew!
 
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Offline Graham

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Me with all my PDR upvotes:

 
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Offline Non Nobis

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I'm going to shamelessly admit that I once sent PDR a PM just to make him aware that I left a lone dot post (by accident  ;)) and that it was his duty to thank it. He did. I am not a superior poster (in PDR's sort of way, or in many ways) to get many upvotes any other way from him, but that is OK.  ;D
[Matthew 8:26]  And Jesus saith to them: Why are you fearful, O ye of little faith? Then rising up he commanded the winds, and the sea, and there came a great calm.

[Job  38:1-5]  Then the Lord answered Job out of a whirlwind, and said: [2] Who is this that wrappeth up sentences in unskillful words? [3] Gird up thy loins like a man: I will ask thee, and answer thou me. [4] Where wast thou when I laid up the foundations of the earth? tell me if thou hast understanding. [5] Who hath laid the measures thereof, if thou knowest? or who hath stretched the line upon it?

Jesus, Mary, I love Thee! Save souls!
 
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Offline Pon de Replay

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I'm going to shamelessly admit that I once sent PDR a PM just to make him aware that I left a lone dot post (by accident  ;)) and that it was his duty to thank it. He did. I am not a superior poster (in PDR's sort of way, or in many ways) to get many upvotes any other way from him, but that is OK.  ;D

I did thank the lone dot, and have probably thanked more than a few of your posts.  If the rate of upvotes is not high, it would only be due to a matter of opinion.  We often disagree.  But I think you are a superior poster yourself.  The same thing goes for the forum user Michael Wilson.  I would like to thank more of his posts, but unfortunately he is an anti-Jansenist.

One thing I might mention is that it's interesting that John Lamb and Graham both appreciated Nietzsche simultaneously alongside Plato.  They also liked him before their conversion to traditional Catholicism.  My experience has been the opposite.  Before I became a traditional Catholic, I was a confirmed Platonist and could only tolerate Nietzsche for his writing style.  Otherwise I found him corrosive in the negative sense.  My preference was for the gooey and the dreamy, and that way lies Catholicism.  Whereas in my apostasy I have found him corrosive in the finest sense.  "One word from me drives out all the bad instincts."  Ice and high mountains.  And I now consider Plato as containing a lot of bunkum.  Nietzsche and Plato are antipodes.  If all of Western philosophy is but a series of footnotes to Plato, as A.N. Whitehead put it, then we are the descendants of an Athenian who was enraptured by the sight of male youths sporting under the Mediterranean sun and who wasn't content leave his aesthetics as they were—he had to suggest that they were shimmers of the divine.


« Last Edit: October 24, 2020, 08:40:59 AM by Pon de Replay »
"The sneakiness of prigs, the conventicle secrecy, gloomy concepts like hell, like sacrifice of the guiltless, like unio mystica in drinking blood; above all, the slowly fanned fire of revenge, of chandala revenge—all that is what became master over Rome."

Rome sank to whoredom and became a stew
The Caesars became beasts, and God—a Jew!
 

Offline Lydia Purpuraria

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I'm going to shamelessly admit that I once sent PDR a PM just to make him aware that I left a lone dot post (by accident  ;)) and that it was his duty to thank it. He did. I am not a superior poster (in PDR's sort of way, or in many ways) to get many upvotes any other way from him, but that is OK.  ;D

 :laugh:  That's funny.

Speaking of upvotes and agreeing vs. disagreeing, etc., sometimes I think it would be nice if there were an "interesting" button in addition to the "thanks" button.  Because there are times that I read posts which I do find interesting (or well-presented, etc.) but don't agree with so I don't "thank" them, but I would mark them "interesting" if I had the option.  (Aaand there are also times that I do go ahead and "thank" a post, but probably find it more "interesting" than something I'm in full agreement with.) 

So anyway, the forum software might not even have the "interesting" option, and it's not a super-serious concern or anything; but that's my two cents. 

P.S.  A "funny" button would be great, too  :D
« Last Edit: October 24, 2020, 01:22:08 PM by Lydia Purpuraria »
 

Offline Lydia Purpuraria

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One book I would like to read on the subject is an anthology, Nietzsche and Asian Thought.

That book looks really interesting, thanks for mentioning it.  I even like this cover illustration pretty well, too:




Quote
There is of course the frequently recurring Nordic and Scandinavian aesthetic in his writings, something which I don't think has been sufficiently paid homage too—the Nazis were too literal and fanatical to the point of being a caricature.

What would you like to see more of along these lines?  (If you don't mind sharing.)
« Last Edit: October 24, 2020, 05:34:42 PM by Lydia Purpuraria »
 
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Offline Pon de Replay

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Quote
There is of course the frequently recurring Nordic and Scandinavian aesthetic in his writings, something which I don't think has been sufficiently paid homage too—the Nazis were too literal and fanatical to the point of being a caricature.

What would you like to see more of along these lines?

I'm not sure.  It seems like something elusive, still waiting for someone to bring it to fruition.  Perhaps there is a young Finn or Norwegian right now who has the history, iconography, and landscape of his or her people in his or her bones, and can honor it properly by not rendering a caricature.  And is reading Nietzsche, and is surely no zer.  Devouring the films of Bergman and Von Trier.  Or perhaps fate is just not interested.
"The sneakiness of prigs, the conventicle secrecy, gloomy concepts like hell, like sacrifice of the guiltless, like unio mystica in drinking blood; above all, the slowly fanned fire of revenge, of chandala revenge—all that is what became master over Rome."

Rome sank to whoredom and became a stew
The Caesars became beasts, and God—a Jew!
 
The following users thanked this post: Lydia Purpuraria